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Explicit: Krokodil In Chicago

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Krokodil, The Flesh-Eating Street Drug That Rots Skin From Inside-Out, Expands To Illinois

 

It's called "the most horrible drug in the world" -- and it's come to Illinois.

 

Dr. Abhin Singala, a specialist at Presence St. Joseph Medical Center in the Chicago suburb of Joliet, said he's treating three people who took "krokodil," a cheap heroin knockoff from Russia known to cause such extreme gangrene and abscesses that a user's muscles, tendons and bones can become exposed.

If you want to kill yourself, this is the way to do it,” Singla said according to the Sun-Times.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/09/krokodil-drug_n_4073417.html

 

krokodil-300x250.jpg

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Given that every new drug gets crazy media hype ("marijuana" will drag your pure white daughters into sin with black jazz musicians and Latin lounge lizards; LSD causes hideous birth defects; millions of crack babies will be a permanent blight on society, etc.), I'm always skeptical about such claims.

 

If krokodil is as horrific as the claims have it, then anybody who choses to inject it is a dumbass. But I haven't seen scientific literature on it yet.

 

And for one thing, I'd doubt very much that the graphic photo up there actually shows krokodil damage.

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Given that every new drug gets crazy media hype ("marijuana" will drag your pure white daughters into sin with black jazz musicians and Latin lounge lizards; LSD causes hideous birth defects; millions of crack babies will be a permanent blight on society, etc.), I'm always skeptical about such claims.

 

If krokodil is as horrific as the claims have it, then anybody who choses to inject it is a dumbass. But I haven't seen scientific literature on it yet.

 

And for one thing, I'd doubt very much that the graphic photo up there actually shows krokodil damage.

 

It is actual krokodil damage. The effects have been well documented in Russia for years. Do you think injecting gasoline plus other solvents into your veins is going to produce pretty results? You really need "scientific literature" to tell you that?

 

I posted this some time ago:

 

I also happened to come across this video of a krokodil junkie having his rotten leg sawed off:

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Yeah, I'm still hopeful that this is the usual hysteria. Snopes says it's real, but they're not the final arbiter of truth. Plenty of otherwise credible people have bought into a laundry-list of hysterias over the years.

 

Drugs are bad m'kay.

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Thank you for the follow-up. I could be wrong in my doubts. (It's happened once or twice before GONZ9729CustomImage1539775.gif )

 

I don't doubt at all that injecting solvents is a mega-stupid idea that would do hellacious damage. But yes, I always doubt everything that's said about new drugs until I see dispassionate examination of the evidence, not just media coverage and videos that may or may not show what they purport to show.

 

I'm NOT saying that what you're posting is fake. Only saying that nearly all of the most horrendous claims made about recreational drugs have turned out to be overblown at best, and outright lies in many cases (e.g. the Thalidomide babies shown in major media of the 1960s as "LSD babies").

 

Now that said, am I going to go out and shoot up krokodil? Or just shrug if some friend did? NO FREAKIN' WAY.

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The Man is trying to keep us from having fun. I'm gonna make me some of dat shit. Anybody else want some? I know it's safe because they want you to think it isn't. 

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The Man is trying to keep us from having fun. I'm gonna make me some of dat shit. Anybody else want some? I know it's safe because they want you to think it isn't. 

 

Doubt anyone thinks it's safe.  Rather, it's hard to not wonder if its just another bogeyman designed to further justify the DEA's efforts to fight the good fight. 

 

Bait and switch.  99% of drug users probably use relatively harmless substances.  Less than 1% of 1% of 1% probably even have access to this drug. 

 

I'm calling bullshit on the photo.  Snopes be damned; no one is going to experience that kind of injury over the period of time a drug would take to cause it and not suffer life-threatening complications first.  Looks to me like this person dipped their arm in acid or is a victim of a firebomb.  I'm no doctor, but can someone explain to me why the tissue is red and healthy looking as opposed to black and puss-ridden? 

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Looks to me like this person dipped their arm in acid or is a victim of a firebomb.  I'm no doctor, but can someone explain to me why the tissue is red and healthy looking as opposed to black and puss-ridden? 

 

 

That looks healthy to you? More like its just been cleaned. And you mean pictures like this?

 

krokodil-drug1.jpg

 

consequences-of-krokodil.jpg

 

krokodile.jpg

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Snopes be damned; no one is going to experience that kind of injury over the period of time a drug would take to cause it and not suffer life-threatening complications first.

 

I'm no doctor.

 

 

Bit contradicting aren't you? 

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I'm talking about the photo in the OP. 

 

The first photo you posted looks like a drug addict, but who knows how much photo shopping was done to it.  The other photos could be other types of injuries. 

 

I'm sure the drug is bad, but this all smells like a government propaganda effort to me.  I'd need more evidence than a few news reports.  Something from a medical association with some peer review. 

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Snopes be damned; no one is going to experience that kind of injury over the period of time a drug would take to cause it and not suffer life-threatening complications first.

 

I'm no doctor.

 

 

Bit contradicting aren't you? 

 

 

Do you know the definition of a contradiction? 

 

Are you claiming you're more of an expert than I am?  Do you have citations of peer reviewed experts on this verifying those photos? 

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Discouraging people from fucking up their lives with dangerous drugs is a bad thing, I guess. I'm not sure paranoia about government is appropriate here.

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Discouraging people from fucking up their lives with dangerous drugs is a bad thing, I guess. I'm not sure paranoia about government is appropriate here.

 

That's not how this usually works.  The government has a long, documented tradition of using scare tactics to justify their war on drugs, which does little to nothing in terms of discouraging use (drug use has been pretty constant over the years having no correlation between propaganda and money thrown at the problem and people arrested and jailed for the problem).  This merely serves to increase funding and stiffen prosecution rates and penalties. 

 

Anyone who might be discouraged from putting opium and gasoline in their veins likely doesn't need pictures of rotting flesh to keep them from going over the edge.  I'm guessing that'd be just about everyone other than some uber poor kids in some hopeless provincial towns in Russia that have pharmacies that sell them the required ingredients over the counter.  Those in the US that have better alternatives aren't likely to take the baton and run with this one I think; not the least of which due to the fact that codeine isn't readily available in the US like it is in Russia and better street drugs are available at cheaper prices to US customers. 

 

Moreover, why do such concoctions exist in the first place?  If you guessed the war on drugs, I'm guessing you'd be right.

 

In any case, before anyone gets too wound up about this one, there's this to think about:

 

 

Very few details about the emergence of krokodil in Arizona are yet available. What we don’t know about this story far outweighs what little we do know. We don’t yet know anything about the patients treated; other substances they may have been using; the extent of krokodil use in their communities; if their use of krokodil was experimental or daily; if they were using it as a substitute for another opioid; or really anything. Much of the reporting thus far has been little more than a few gory pictures of “flesh rot” and fear mongering about the drug.

http://www.alternet.org/drugs/drugs-krokodil-are-result-irresponsible-war-drugs-policy

 

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Discouraging people from fucking up their lives with dangerous drugs is a bad thing, I guess. I'm not sure paranoia about government is appropriate here.

 

Personally, I don't think government's involved yet. The media certainly is. I also don't know whether this is a disinformation campaign or not. But aren't we people who supposedly believe in examining objective evidence before making up our minds?

 

"Discouraging people from fucking up their lives with dangerous drugs" isn't a bad thing if the discouraging is done by disseminating factual information. But if people learn that the "experts" lie or exaggerate, that actually makes them more inclined to try dangerous drugs.

 

Case in point. I heard that one of the most brilliant, studious, and conservative girls I went to high school with had become a heroin addict. I didn't believe it. Shortly thereafter I walked past a rehab center, and there she was (working as a counselor by then, fortunately). When I asked her how the hell she, of all people, got hooked on heroin she said, "They told me marijuana would kill me. I tried it and it didn't. They told me LSD would kill me. I tried it and it didn't. They told me heroin would kill me. I tried it and it damn well nearly did."

 

If she had known the information she got was accurate -- not sensationalized, not exaggerated, not made up out of whole cloth to sell stories or pad the budgets of drug warriors -- she'd never have gone that far.

 

Again, I'm making NO claims about krocodil. I'm just being what I thought we all were hereabouts -- skeptical.

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OMFG did you hear about this new drug "Jenkem"?????!!!  eek.gif

 

 

 

On 09/19/07 Corporal Disarro received an email from a concerned parent regarding a new drug called �Jenkem�. The parent advised their child learned about this drug through various conversations with several students at Palmetto Ridge High.

Jenkem originated in Africa and other third world countries by fermenting raw sewage to create a gas which is inhaled to achieve a high. Jenkem is now a popular drug in American Schools. Jenkem is a homemade substance which consists of fecal matter and urine. The fecal matter and urine are placed in a bottle or jar and covered most commonly with a balloon. The container is then placed in a sunny area for several hours or days until fermented. The contents
of the container will separate and release a gas, which is captured in the balloon. Inhaling the gas is said to have a euphoric high similar to ingesting cocaine but with strong hallucinations of times past.

Once ingested the onset of the high takes approximately 10 seconds with the most severe hallucinations happening in approximately 20 minutes. Several articles indicate that the subject immediately passes out after ingesting the gas then regains a magical/hallucinogenic state within seconds of regaining consciousness. The high has been described by subjects as a feeling of �being out of it� and talking to dead people. The feeling of being �out of it� may last for several hours or days.

All subjects who used the Jenkem disliked the taste of sewage in their mouth and
the fact that the taste continued for several days.

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More Darwin Award nominees thinning the gene pool.

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I remember hearing about jenkem on the news a few years back. Never heard much else.

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I remember hearing about jenkem on the news a few years back. Never heard much else.

 

You may know it by its street name "butt hash."

 

 

GONZ9729CustomImage1539775.gif

 

http://www.snopes.com/crime/warnings/jenkem.asp

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The proliferation of this drug was something I recently had to present as a case of the term in grad school. As already stated, this drug has been used in other countries. The first possible cases were reported in Arizona. It is likely fairly widespread among people who would be willing to use the drug. The drug is a narcotic and not any more deadly in terms of other narcotics already being used. However, the various caustics that are used as solvents such as gasoline are what seem to lead to the dramatic effects that you see on the videos and pictures.

 

Unfortunately, asking why would someone do this is difficult. People with significant addictions may be willing to do extraordinary things to themselves. This drug has massive appeal to people because it is as effective as other narcotics like heroin but can be manufactured very cheaply making it much easier for people who are financially constrained to obtain.

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RogueScholar -- In your research, did you run across any scientific examination of the effects of krokodil?

 

As has been pointed out here, that first photo posted by the OP does not appear to be the effects of gangrene, but looks more like a wound from an explosion or some other terrible, rapid trauma.

 

Some of the other images posted seem more consistent with the damage described in articles I've read about the drug (and seem as if they could credibly be caused by caustic agents). But nothing I've ever read or seen about the drug has come with anything I'd consider to be solid proof, either that krocodil is what the media claims or does what the images show.

 

I can well believe the drug, if it's made as described, can do horrific damage. I just want to see sources that are less sensation-driven and more reliable.

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Yes, but it is somewhat limited. I've included two popular sources that are frequently referenced. The actual narcotic (opiate) is called desomorphine and has been around for a while. This home brewed method of production is a bit more contemporary. As such a search for desomorphine may provide additional information. Also, I'm not suggesting all the pictures here are real, only that this drug appears to be a potential emergent phenomenon in the United States.

 

Gahr M, Freudenmann RW, Hiemke C, Gunst IM, Connemann BJ, Schönfeldt-Lecuona C. “Krokodil” – Revival of an Old Drug with New Problems. Substance Use & Misuse. 2012; 47 (7): 861-863.

 

Medtox Journal on Drug Abuse Recognition. 2012. Emerging European drug problem has attention of U.S. drug experts.

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Thank you, RogueScholar! I'll see if I can find those.

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The abstract for the systemic review can be found here: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/10826084.2012.669807

 

You'll need academic privileges or you'll have to pay for full text access however.

 

You can find a good abstract of another literature review here:

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/23726898/?i=3&from=/22468632/related

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Yes, but it is somewhat limited. I've included two popular sources that are frequently referenced. The actual narcotic (opiate) is called desomorphine and has been around for a while. This home brewed method of production is a bit more contemporary. As such a search for desomorphine may provide additional information. Also, I'm not suggesting all the pictures here are real, only that this drug appears to be a potential emergent phenomenon in the United States.

 

Gahr M, Freudenmann RW, Hiemke C, Gunst IM, Connemann BJ, Schönfeldt-Lecuona C. “Krokodil” – Revival of an Old Drug with New Problems. Substance Use & Misuse. 2012; 47 (7): 861-863.

 

Medtox Journal on Drug Abuse Recognition. 2012. Emerging European drug problem has attention of U.S. drug experts.

I read that a required ingredient is codeine, which can be bought over the counter in Russia, but which has strong prescription controls in the US, erasing the cheaper costs of producing the drug for those in the US compared to Russia. Can you speak to this based on your research?

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Actually, many areas of Russia have started to regulate Codeine in response to the krokodil problem. While Codeine is a scheduled substance in the United States, depending on the dose and preparation, it's pretty low on the list. With that said, prescription drug abuse is highly prevalent in the United States and obtaining prescription opiates is not all that hard. Regarding the cost, it may be impacted somewhat, I'm not sure. Codeine is relatively cheap and easy to obtain, therefore krokodil is probably still going to compete in terms of lower cost.

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