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I Dream Of Mayberry

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"I miss the good old days. You know, when things were simpler and more pure. Like Mayberry."

 

This is probably one of the most absolutely ridiculous notions in America today. Seriously. What makes it worse would be the fact that everyone wants things to be like Mayberry. They wish for Mayberry whenever they hear news about legislation that favors quicker immigration is being considered. They cry for Mayberry's Christian family values whenever they hear yet another state is willing to acknowledge and offer benefits to married gay couples.

 

Even politicians use the good ole times excuse when passing discriminating legislation. Take Asa Hutchinson, governor of Arkansas for example. He was just about to sign into law one of those Religious Restoration Acts, and after seeing the backlash in Indiana, has become nervous about what he is about to do, deciding to send the legislation back for revision instead. His public statement? "....in ordinary times this bill would not be controversial, but these are not ordinary times."

 

Which basically is saying,"Why can't we be in Mayberry again?"

 

I hate to break it to you, but the circumstances of Mayberry never existed in America. Never, ever. Never, ever, never, ever, ever, EVER. People see that 1960's family show and treat it like an honest representation of the all American family. God, common sense, and small government. This governor I was mentioning grew up watching the show, and others with similar themes. He doesn't understand that Mayberry, while set in the 60's expanding economy, was based on the simpler times of the 1930's. There was a desire for nostalgia to be brought into the show, and that is why folk music, church, and focus on family were incorporated.

 

So, what? Then let's go back to the 30's then. They were good times, right?

 

You tell me.

 

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The only thing good about the 1930's was the increased desire for simple living, and that's mostly because they didn't have a choice back then. With the desire for simple living came an increased demand for folk music and art. Jobs were scarce thanks to the Depression. Add the agricultural disasters like the Dust Bowl on top of it? Food was scarce too. Tradition became king during that decade before WWII broke out, and so did a tough as nails attitude when faced with desperation to survive. Mayberry never bothered with any of that. It had the lush economy of the 1960's story setting to keep the ugly struggles of the Depression away.... Read more here at my blog The Bluegrass Skeptic http://thebluegrassskeptic.com/2015/05/15/i-dream-of-mayberry/

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Pardon me? Hahaha I wrote this completely. Anytime I use an outside source for things like statistics or if I expand on something I've read, I alway give sources. This whole Mayberry notion I have listened to for years from coworkers, family, and even a few lovers. And I recognize it for the joke it is. As far as what time period the show is based off of, that is on Wikipedia. But how the 30s and 60s were, that's high school 101. So maybe I owe wikipedia credit for telling me exactly which time period they incorporated on the show. :-)

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That was a beautifully brilliant post Zomberina, telling how the fifties and its fellow decades actually was compared to the much vaunted televisual American fifties, the playground of Lucille Ball, June Cleaver and Andy Griffiths.

 

It's true that the 30s to the 60s in America and its allies were grim, tough but soft hearted in some quarters such as in the underground culture of homophiles who had to learn from much stigmatised political parties and various activists such as Barbara Gittings (who I admire - Wikipedia her please) and Frank Kameny (ditto); the black people who had to endure terrible racial slurs in the streets, they had to stay in the unofficial ghettos probably to this day but altered as living in poor neighbourhoods such as that of Detroit or slummy social housing (which is meekly called 'the projects' in some places) not dissimilar to how the Jews lived before the Nazis embarked on their despicable holocaust; and the disabled people were across many Anglo-American (and associated) nations forced to live in institutions and even forced to endure sterilisation and institutional abuse in the name of eugenics which were later copied by the Nazis who admired the initiative the Americans and Europeans were taking.

 

These histories are rather ugly and I agree with you that we should not hide these ugly histories so we can force ourselves to go into even uglier futures. The fundamentalist Christian, I agree are being deluded and sometimes bigoted about how they see history.

 

Congratulations, Zomberina!

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Awesome post.

 

I'd like to add that this sort of historical revisionism in television was rampant during the 60-70s. There was an onslaught of Westerns (Bonaza, The Virginian, Gunsmoke and others) during the 60s, along with shows like The Andy Griffith Show, The Beverly Hillbillies and lots of other shows that idealized the past and portrayed the rural white American mindset.

 

The Waltons and Little House on the Prairie did the same thing during the 70s and early 80s. Both shows were 'wholesome' and basically glazed over the hardships of the periods they were based in. Hell, even MASH was somewhat revisionist, attempting to make sense and show a sense of humor about the early conflict in Korea in a post-Vietnam era.

 

Today's Mayberryism can be summed up thusly:

"(Well) I miss Mayberry

Sitting on the porch drinking ice-cold cherry Coke
Where everything is black and white 
Picking on a six string
Where people pass by and you call them by their first name
Watching the clouds roll by
Bye, bye" -- Lyrics to "Mayberry" by country group Rascal Flatts
 
Interpret them how you will, I think it's pretty open and shut for those of us who live in the space between California and New York. wink.png
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Excellent post Zomberina!  You are a very gifted writer.  I look forward to reading more of your posts in the future.

 

Interestingly enough, I was laying in my bed last night thinking about the ridiculous song by Rascal Flats titled, "Mayberry".  I went to sleep pondering how anybody could possibly be comfortable living in the 'black and white' society that is idolized in that song.

 

I woke up today and accidentally found this article.  Synchronicity?  Mere Coincidence?  Who the hell knows. lol  All the same, you made some fantastic points in this post. 

 

Keep writing Zomberina!  You're really good at it.  (I'm sure you already know that though, don't you?) tongue.png

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Now I am going to have to find this song and listen. I can't stand rockabilly music though, but I'll persevere to better understand the references in this thread.

 

So glad you all like my writings. :)

 

I was told Read. Write. Risk.  And every time I post one, I always get nervous my audience won't come back because whatever I'd composed was horribly flawed. hahah!

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Now I am going to have to find this song and listen. I can't stand rockabilly music though, but I'll persevere to better understand the references in this thread.

 

 

Trust me Zomberina, I have a feeling you're going to love it...  And, by love it, I mean you'll probably feel a strong urge to rage-hate on it. lol  It epitomizes everything you just wrote about.

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Oh my goodness, I barely got through that. I mean, it's a horrendously put together piece anyway. But, the first few verses just irked the piss out of me.

 

Somedays it feels like we're spinning faster than we used to in the old days?

 

So, naturally we have more natural disasters from the strain of a fast pace?

Da fuck? Was the writer an eight year old that hadn't gotten into earth science yet?????

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Oh you know you liked dat durr Mayburry!!!!! Hawhawhaw....

 

The individual members of the band Rascal Flatts  have gospel/CCM backgrounds. The group itself (to my knowledge) has never released anything in those genres, preferring to stick to modern country. So it's entirely within the realm of possibility that they may not have gotten to that chapter in the Bible where God gives us earth science (oh wait, nevermind...)

 

Sadly, things have gotten worse in country music since that song was released. I wish that the drivel that pumped through the airwaves of my 3 local country music stations was even half as 'good' as that song. No shit, try listening to some Florida Georgia Line for a taste of the lyrical wizardry (sarcasm should be noted!) of the country genre these days...

 

Anyway, I really enjoyed this blog entry. It reminded me of a lot of the conversations I had with the older (45+) folks at my former church. Everyone talked about how great it was in the old days. Everyone glossed over the realities of the times. Or maybe they were lucky enough to be members of the comfortably numb white middle class during that time period?
 
Idk. I used to get uncomfortable when topics were mentioned in my bible study group. The older folks would talk about how nice and safe things used to be, how respectful the youth were and how 'gay' and 'illegitimacy' weren't 'real issues' back then. People were helpful! Government was effective! Socialism was a dirty word! smiliegojerkit.gif
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I think they glossed over the issues of the times. Seriously, seven, it seems that folks only remember what was convenient. They marry into their delusions pop culture ideals and try to act like that is how things really were.

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