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TheBluegrassSkeptic

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The argument I hear most is that if at the end, you picked the wrong path of "no God" and there is a God, the judgement is severe. So many say to me, "Why not just go with God. If you are wrong, you don't lose anything in the end." Which, that rationale in itself, cheapens the value of God right there.

 

Don't these religious nutjobs see what is wrong with that argument?

 

Even Pascal himself, who postulated this whole thing for mathmatical demonstration, admitted to siding with belief in God even if you didn't believe, in hopes you eventually truly would believe....

 

Forget the fact that you "lose" the rewards you were promised, but look at all the sacrifices you made based on biblical morality and laws. You lost out on parts of your life and experiences, possibly even friends and family, because of your choice to believe in an idol you aren't even sure about. And on top of that, what if the doctrine you chose is wrong? Why would you make choices that might lead your life to more suffering than joy because it is the way God's law says it is to be? It doesn't make any sense to me at all.

 

Pascal's wager is a trick question. Why on earth do people still keep trying to use it to prove Christianity's benefit?

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You can also take that logic and reverse it. If there is a God and I don't believe in Him, He has no reason to prove Himself to me. So it's all a moot point. Believe whatever you're inclined to believe. A fellow sentient being cannot be harmed by your absence of belief.

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But I think it is grossly unfair that I am potentially harmed by my abscence of belief in a society run on it! Look at what the Catholic church has done to the medical community! They merge with PUBLIC facilities and then ban contraception, ligations, hormone therapy and more.

 

:o/

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A lot of people made a big deal about Anthony Flew's conversion to deism from atheism, but I am mystified as to why this is. I am an atheist, an agnostic, and a deist. I don't think there is a god, I don't know whether there is a god, and if there is a god, I am worshiping him in the best way I know how: by being honest about what I think is the most likely. Because before I can worship a god I must first find one worth worshiping, and not despair that I have to put up with cheap imitations that I have come across so far. That is a recipe for damnation, and even if I never find one, I can always be confident that someone, someday, might, and that whatever god that actually exists will see my sincerity and reward that. Wagering against what we regard as the truth seems to me to be a very risky business indeed.

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There is some http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/FridgeHorror"]Fridge Horror[/url] in the arguement of pascal's wager. For one, it makes atheism all the more desirable. Who wants there to exist a being who is going to punish you if you're wrong? Ironically, there is a part of me that does want some god or afterlife to exist, but if we're believing just to escape a potential horrific afterlife, than I'd rather find evidence against that god.

 

Second of all, it's implying that life on earth doesn't matter. Infact, that's the problem I have with religion all together. It's devoting the one life you surely have to FAITH, something that can't be proven. It's one thing to have faith, but when it takes over your life, you miss out. All for the fear of potential punishment that may or may not exist? And they say atheists have the depressing worldview?

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Fantastic points everybody! I agreee with jackbauer on the horror part. It IS emotional abuse, extortion and major guilt tripping mind games that forces you to make that decision to agree with the concept of GOD...at least from a lot of the major religions out there.

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