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Bavinck

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Bavinck last won the day on September 27

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About Bavinck

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    Post-classical Greek
  • More About Me
    Professing Christian for 16 years, currently a reluctant agnostic

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  • Still have any Gods? If so, who or what?
    No

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  1. Thanks for your comments interestingly I still feel that a lot of what Christianity says makes sense. For example, I don’t believe it teaches an eternal conscious torment view of Hell, nor do I believe it even attempted to teach about science. I just realised that I don’t actually truly believe it, even if it makes sense to me. That is likely to be an interesting part of this process as I look back over time. I recall discussing my changing view of Hell with my dad and cheerily saying I don’t believe in eternal conscious torment, but that it is really the death penalty. I said this with no hint of concern for him, just a happy assertion of what I now think the text says. That was a big catalyst for change for me… if I really believe in it, then how could I not feel a joy of concern about it. Hugo Mercier’s book on gullibility also was a key factor - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Not-Born-Yesterday-Hugo-Mercier/dp/0691178704/ref=nodl_ it highlighted different levels of belief, and showed that what we claim to believe is often not accompanied by a deep down commitment to that belief. He gave examples of people who feel that a business is supporting atrocities and just leaving a bad trip-advisor review. Rather than actually going out and making change, people just say they believe something and leave it there. That was basically me in a nutshell I expect plenty of cognitive dissonance going forward, and intend to keep reading on Christianity. The tragedy aspect is something I have been acutely aware of being a possibility. I have asked those I have told to keep it private, and was largely absent from church for quite some time before this.
  2. Found myself at the weekend listening to some things on humanism. Think I need to ban myself from looking into any systems of thought for a while. Danger might be jumping from a Christianity to something else to just fill the gap
  3. Finally admitted this week to myself and to my church that I can no longer call myself a Christian. Been a few years in the making and was a huge sense of relief when I just admitted it to myself; daunting to admit it to others though. The lockdown here in the UK during covid and the separation from going to church gave me the space I needed to see what is important to me. Seems the answer after two years of not praying and only reading the Bible where it crosses my interests is that what is important to me isn’t God. More a case of being interested in religion rather than being religious. Any attendance at church has been more about peer pressure for a few years now than actually a desire to be there. Feels somewhat like breaking up a relationship though when thinking of the people I know. Not exactly bouncing with joy about it, but convinced it is the right decision Currently tutoring some people on the Greek of the New Testament. Luckily both groups decided to stick it out when I told them and gave them the chance to drop me. All friends have been really good so far, so that is a relief. Family aren’t religious so no issues on that front. Anyway, I hope the use of a reformed theologians name as my username isn’t a sign of apostasy from my reluctant agnosticism
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