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VacuumFlux

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VacuumFlux last won the day on August 16 2013

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About VacuumFlux

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    Apostate

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    Female
  • Interests
    python, data analysis, books, music (mostly irish, right now; i play woodwinds), sewing, crafts (many of them)

Previous Fields

  • Still have any Gods? If so, who or what?
    not for now
  1. Fred Clark http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktivist/ Didn't find his blog until after I deconverted; I'm not sure how fundy-me would have reacted, and if I'd have been fascinated or horrified. He comes from an Evangelical background and spends a lot of his time calling out his fellow Christians for the things they're doing wrong. He points out a lot of the things that bothered me about the Christianity I grew up with, and even explained a few things I knew felt weird but couldn't articulate why. And, much to my surprise, I found it comforting to hear someone talking in christianeze and us
  2. I do think there is some objectivity to morality, in the sense that actions have real consequences and you can measure whether or not your action result in the desired consequences. Which puts me quite at odds with some christians, who think that the whole point is to enforce their god's rules, consequences and harm to others be damned. (Of course they believe that if everyone followed their rules we'd all be happy, therefore it's everyone's fault but theirs when their moralizing causes harm.) The part that's subjective is what the desired outcomes are. I, informed by modern western societ
  3. Those that rebel against societal norms and take action against societies' laws tend to have less offspring than those that don't. To the extent such behavior is genetically based, basic evolutionary theory predicts that those genes, and resulting behavior, will diminish within the gene pool. To the extent such behavior is contrary to the expectations of the society in which the subject lives, the behavior will be admonished, discouraged, punished, etc. Either way, or in combination, this explains why only a small minority of people behave like this. Flipping it around, humans are socia
  4. Pre-natal hormones are an interesting one. Boys who have older brothers are more likely to be gay, because the mother's body produces a different set of hormones. I was surprised by that one when I first learned about it, because that means that it be true both that it's environmental not genetic, and that you were born that way.
  5. I told god, while I still believed, that the version of Him that I'd learned was really messed up and I've have to walk away for a bit. I fully intended to come back later, once I'd had time to heal and grieve. And then... I didn't. I still read stuff about world religions because humanity is fascinating, but I never did feel a need to go back and take Christianity seriously to disprove it. Was kinda surprised when I realized that. So take a break from thinking about Christianity, and if you need to go back and deal with it later, go ahead, but maybe you'll just stop caring.
  6. I sincerely doubt ancient people took all of their myths literally. Ever read "The Case for God" by Karen Armstrong? She underscores the importance of keeping "Mythos" (symbolic and spiritual interpretation) and "Logos" (literal approach to the world. For instance, history and natural science) apart, and makes the claim that many ancient people were more capable of this than many of us seem to think. I still think some myths have something to offer us. They're not simply fairytales, but have messages embedded in them, told in a fantastical way. It does become a problem however, when they're in
  7. I wouldn't recommend doing that until you've been out of church for a while. I had a while where I thought I'd read the bible from a secular perspective to see what it said, instead of what I'd always been told it said, but I found myself shaking and upset every time I'd try. But after a few years of being deconverted, that calmed down on its own. I don't feel such an urge to read the bible now, because I don't have as much to prove to myself, but I can read bits of it on occasion without it being traumatic. I did spend a while reading a blog from a progressive liberal christian, the kind
  8. As to fetuses, a lot of the stuff you use to describe them could also be applied to newborns. I'm not trying to be ridiculous here, but I think life begins at least when heart and brain activity begin. The fetus already has it's own DNA...not mom's or dad's. I actually don't know if there is a scientific consensus on the matter or not. That's what interests me, not religious or legal opinions, and I think that's where other people don't always get me when this issue comes up. Yes, the big difference between a late term fetus and a newborn is whether its self-supporting (with food and car
  9. My grandma was "gone" long before she died. With the right meds at just the right time, she might know who and where she was, and who you were, for a few minutes each day. We wanted to hold on to those moments for as long as possible, but they kept slipping away. When her body died, it was something of a relief to know that it was all over - that the husk that used to contain grandma wasn't going to be taunting us with memories of someone we'd never see again, and that whatever was left of the person we'd known was no longer suffering the fear and confusion of being trapped in a body that no l
  10. My grandma was "gone" long before she died. With the right meds at just the right time, she might know who and where she was, and who you were, for a few minutes each day. We wanted to hold on to those moments for as long as possible, but they kept slipping away. When her body died, it was something of a relief to know that it was all over - that the husk that used to contain grandma wasn't going to be taunting us with memories of someone we'd never see again, and that whatever was left of the person we'd known was no longer suffering the fear and confusion of being trapped in a body that no l
  11. Planned Parenthood also provides birth control, so these weren't just pregnancies that would have been aborted, these are conceptions that never would have happened if the low income women had access to health care. The low income part is tragic because these are women who don't have other ways to afford health care (which includes pre-natal care for wanted pregnancies), who, with access to birth control, would likely have chosen never to get pregnant because they feel like they're already too poor to take care of the kids they have. Kinda like how it's tragic that teen pregnancies go up when
  12. Well, as long as it stays in your head, who's being harmed? Now, granted, if you harbor grudges you'll feel miserable and it'll leak out in your actions eventually. But getting annoyed at people sometimes, feeling negative emotions, is just part of being human. I've found that when I let myself feel pissy in my head, but keep it to myself, and don't bother feeling guilty about it... then thinking those thoughts is sufficient for "expressing" my negative emotions. But if I feel guilty I start obsessing over negative emotions, they don't go away, and I feel worse and act worse.
  13. Don't be ashamed of your sexuality. Feel free to exercise it within in the limits of medical safety and informed consent. Don't let anyone shame you for having too much sex or for having too little (though if this is a recurring conflict in a long term relationship, it will need worked out and you should take the other's feelings seriously). Don't let anyone pressure you into sex you don't want (or even don't feel ready for right now but might want later), and if you're in a relationship with a person who does so repeatedly you should probably get out. Don't be vague about consent because
  14. There are certainly going to be paths that open up for you in life that you didn't expect, coincidences that line up, etc. The circumstances you're born into, your DNA, they all influence you in certain directions. Whether or there's an intelligence out there deciding to make things line up like that for you, that doesn't fit into a definition of a god, is a different question. I personally see no evidence of any intelligent beings directing my life or the life of others, but I do see a lot of... zeitgeist, I guess. And riding the waves of history is certainly a way of being involved in forces
  15. Sometimes I describe myself as an "materialist atheist Jungian polytheist". Carl Jung came up with the idea of the Collective Unconscious and the gods as Archetypes. Now, I think he actually believed that this was a collective thing external to individual humans that we could tap into, whereas I believe we just all have similar ideas unique to our own brains, but in practice those are very similar ideas. I have not yet actually read any of Jung; that's on my list to do some day. As for book recommendations, I don't have many. I've mostly read blogs and academic books - working at a univers
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