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Looking For A Study Bible


saxyroze
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Does anyone know where I could find a study bible that, instead of studying the spirituality of Christianity and the bible, actually studies the real history of how the bible was written, by whom, all of the revises it undertook and about the politics and life of the time?

 

Or am I asking for too much?

 

I don’t actually think that there is such a bible. It would mean it would have to be a secular bible, which would be a contradiction eh? Well, if anyone knows of such a bible, please point me in its direction! I’d love to see what it has to say.

 

If there isn’t such a bible, someone should make one. Seriously.

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The Oxford Press has a college Bible that is something like that... but my copy of it is in storage right now. Does anyone know what I'm talking about?

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Does anyone know where I could find a study bible that, instead of studying the spirituality of Christianity and the bible, actually studies the real history of how the bible was written, by whom, all of the revises it undertook and about the politics and life of the time?

 

Or am I asking for too much?

 

I don’t actually think that there is such a bible. It would mean it would have to be a secular bible, which would be a contradiction eh? Well, if anyone knows of such a bible, please point me in its direction! I’d love to see what it has to say.

 

If there isn’t such a bible, someone should make one. Seriously.

 

The Anchor Bible is pretty good in this regard, but it is very expensive and will take half your life to read. Get it from your library.

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The Oxford Press has a college Bible that is something like that... but my copy of it is in storage right now. Does anyone know what I'm talking about?

 

I think your thinking of the oxford anotated bible, its a good study bible. Its the NRSV translation, which is one of the better translations.

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There also ought to be a bible that reads in the order that the books were actually written - with the dates stamped in big bold letters above the book title - not in the contrived order that makes the propaganda 'flow' best. Anachronisms would be glaring. The changing theology and evolution of the Jewish/Christian beliefs and the elaboration or disputing of earlier themes would become much more apparent. To have the writings of Paul start off the New Testament, to see far more clearly that the person who REALLY started the whole thing was a person who never even knew a man named Jesus, who launched a religion based on a garden variety hallucination, well before any so-called 'historical' words and deeds of a Jesus man-god were ever placed into a character's mouth by authors too late to have been eyewitnesses of anything at all.

 

That would be a great bible to have.

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NIV Study Bible is pretty decent that way. You should be able to find a hard cover version without breaking the bank, or as someone else suggested, at the library.

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I'd also recommend reading The Five Gospels by the Jesus Seminar for a more academic translation of the Gospels. Funk and Miller's The Complete Gospels also include translations of the non-canonical gospels.

 

As far as a good academic study Bible goes, I agree that the New Oxford Annotated Bible is the best. Most university professors of religion have it on their shelves and use it in their classes.

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The Oxford Press has a college Bible that is something like that... but my copy of it is in storage right now. Does anyone know what I'm talking about?

 

I think your thinking of the oxford anotated bible, its a good study bible. Its the NRSV translation, which is one of the better translations.

 

The New Oxford Annotated Bible was the one used by my Unitarian minister when we did a Bible study. The study notes are more informative than preachy, although I don't think it went into deep detail on the writing of the Bible and the revisions and politics behind it. I was fortunate to pick up a used copy of the Oxford at Goodwill for only two bucks! The book we used as a study guide was Understanding The Bible: An Introduction For Skeptics, Seekers, and Religious Liberals, by John A. Buehrens. It had an opening section which covered why we should read the Bible, where the Bible comes from, how to choose what Bible to read, and also a few pages on interpretation. The versions that Buehrens recommends are: The New Oxford Annotated Bible with the Apocrypha (NRSV), Oxford Study Bible (REB), and the Catholic Study Bible (NAB). He also recommends The Tanakh as the best English translation of the Hebrew Bible (OT). I've considered purchasing a Tanakh; I think it would be really interesting to see how the Jewish interpretation lines up with what the evangelicals claim!

 

NIV Study Bible is pretty decent that way. You should be able to find a hard cover version without breaking the bank, or as someone else suggested, at the library.

This is the Bible used by my former evangelical church. While the text is easy to use, the study notes are in line with evangelical interpretation, so beware!

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While everyone is asking i was interested in getting a Jewish bible (I know bible isn't the right word but I don't know what to call it). I'd want it with god commentary so I can see how different they interpret the old testament compared to christians.

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the Tanakh that Ex-Cog mentioned is the best Jewish study Bible in English. It is published by Jewish Publication Society (JPS).

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