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Yeah, I Remember Amalek


Beowulf
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Anyone find anything ironic in this Bible verse?

 

Exodus 17:14

 

And the LORD said unto Moses, Write this [for] a memorial in a book, and rehearse [it] in the ears of Joshua: for I will utterly put out the remembrance of Amalek from under heaven.

 

I love the way a single verse shatters all logic and notions of inerrancy.

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Pretty observant, Beowulf...another fine example of babblethink. "Write it down so you can always remember to forget about it." I wonder how the fundies would explain THAT one.

 

“Most people are bothered by those passages of Scripture they do not understand, but the passages that bother me are those I do understand.” (Mark Twain)

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I've never heard of that particular person (at least, I assume Amalek was a person or deity of some sort) or verse before. But it is ironic. You'd think they would've included a note to the scribe(s): And scratch this verse out so it will not get copied again.

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I've never heard of that particular person (at least, I assume Amalek was a person or deity of some sort) or verse before. But it is ironic. You'd think they would've included a note to the scribe(s): And scratch this verse out so it will not get copied again.

 

When I was little, my mother read to me every night from a children's verson of the Bible. I remember lots of stories about the Exodus, and in particular, the Israelites' battles with the Amelekites. Of course, my five-year-old brain pictured these as strange beings shaped like kites with arms and legs!

 

According to Wikipedia, Amalek was the grandson of Esau. Since he was not a descendant of Jacob/Israel, his descendents eventually became enemies of Israel's descendants, especially when the "Children of Israel" tried to re-enter Caanan. The name "Amalek" came to refer to the people, in much the same was that "Israel" refers to a nation.

 

Thus endeth the Bible lesson. Despite Gawd's command, we remember Amalek. In fact, so does the Bible, with references to Amalek and the Amalekites with references in Judges, 1 & 2 Samuel, 1 Chronicles, and Psalms. The apologists might say that this is a failure on our part by disregarding Gawd's commandment, rather than a failure of Gawd. (Even though it says, "I will utterly put out the remembrance of Amalek from under heaven") The point is, regardless of anyone's disobedience, the command itself was foolish - "write it down, practice it, but I'll make you forget it."

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This is all easily explainable. You see "god" said he'd take care of it waaaaay back in Exodus, but as in all things, as time went on he got busy and another command happened:

 

Deuteronomy 25:19 Therefore it shall be, when the LORD thy God hath given thee rest from all thine enemies round about, in the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee for an inheritance to possess it, that thou shalt blot out the remembrance of Amalek from under heaven; thou shalt not forget it.

 

Seems the whole thing got laid at our feet and we blew it. When the Israelites were all done getting their inheritance they were supposed to blot out the rememberance and this was the reminder note. Oops.

 

Maybe there's still time? Everyone grab your White-Out and your bible(s)!

 

mwc

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Here's another one:

 

Joshua 9:26,27

So Joshua saved them from the Israelites, and they did not kill them. That day he made the Gibeonites woodcutters and water carriers for the community and for the altar of the LORD at the place the LORD would choose. And that is what they are to this day.

 

Really? The Gibeonites are still slaves to the Jews? How about that...

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