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Lilith The Pagan Goddess Of The Bible


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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S7gvkwljEnQ

 

"Evidence Christians & Jews adopted Pagan Gods. "

 

This video is by a guy named Brett Keane (I suggest subscribing to him). He talks about something I never heard of before. According to the bible, lilith was the first woman god ever created and she was created equal with adam (from the dirt). But she didn't want to be with adam and she didn't want to be lower than him so she rebelled. Well God kicked her out and she came back in the presence of a serpent and she tempted Eve and Adam! The myth of lilith is older than judaism so this is very interesting. If you know anything else please tell me!

 

 

I love mythology :woohoo:

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Well I found the story for lilith here. I'm not sure how valid the dates are or the validity of the sources.

http://www.lilithgallery.com/library/index.html

The Biblical Lilith:

When the Almighty created the first, solitary man, He said: It is not good for man to be alone. And He fashioned for man a woman from the earth, like him (Adam), and called her Lilith. Soon, they began to quarrel with each other. She said to him: I will not lie underneath, and he said: I will not lie underneath but above, for you are meant to lie underneath and I to lie above. She said to him: We are both equal, because we are both created from the earth. But they did not listen to each other.

 

When Lilith saw this, she pronounced God's avowed name and flew into the air. Adam stood in prayer before his Creator and said: Lord of the World! The woman you have given me has gone away from me. Immediately, the Almighty sent three angels after her, to bring her back.

 

The Almighty said to the Angels: If she decides to return, it is good, but if not, then she must take it upon herself to ensure that a hundred of her children die each day. They went to her and found her in the middle of the Red Sea. And they told her the word of God. But she refused to return. They said to her: We must drown you in the sea. She said: Leave me! I was created for no other purpose than to harm children, eight days for boys and twenty for girls.

 

When they heard what she said, they pressed her even more. She said: I swear by the name of the living God that I, when I see you or your image on an amulet, will have no power over that particular child. And she took it upon herself to ensure that, every day, a hundred of her children died. That is why we say that, every day, a hundred of her demons die. That is why we write the names Senoi, Sansenoi and Semangloph on an amulet for small children. Andwhen Lilith sees it, she remembers her promise and the child is saved.

 

180px-Lilith_(John_Collier_painting).jpg

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Keep looking and you'll find plenty of strange stories of Lilith. She's a succubus and so many weird sexual stories are out there. It's been quite some time but she left Adam because she wanted to be on top and he wouldn't let her, as you stated. Since then she comes to men in the middle of the night and excites them by sitting on their faces and whatnot (she's the source of "wet dreams" and nocturnal emissions is the gist of that) while they sleep. Lots of things like that are associated with Lilith. As I recall that's even why they chose the name of the character on the series Cheers (don't quote me on this).

 

The stories of Lilith are borrowed to explain the two creation stories of woman (and the first creation of Eve, much like a Frankenstein's Monster, grosses out poor Adam and he won't touch her which is why the next version and final version requires him to sleep). Overall it takes three goes to get an helpmeet for old Adam if we go by tradition.

 

mwc

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Thanks mwc. I'm trying to look for sources about lilith. Whether they be pagan or whether they are from jewish myth. Here is something I did find though which doubts its authenticity

http://www.ucalgary.ca/~elsegal/Shokel/950206_Lilith.html

The story implies that when Eve was afterwards fashioned out of Adam's rib (symbolic of her subjection to him), this was to serve as an antidote to Lilith's short-lived attempt at egalitarianism. Here, declare the feminists matronizingly, we have a clear statement of the Rabbinic Attitude Towards Women!

 

There is only one slight problem with this theory: The story of Lilith is not actually found in any authentic Rabbinic tradition. Although it is repeatedly cited as a "Rabbinic legend" or a "midrash," it is not recorded in any ancient Jewish text!

 

The tale of Lilith originates in a medieval work called "the Alphabet of Ben-Sira," a work whose relationship to the conventional streams of Judaism is, to say the least, problematic.

 

The unknown author of this work has filled it with many elements that seem designed to upset the sensibilities of traditional Jews. In particular, the heroes of the Bible and Talmud are frequently portrayed in the most perverse colours. Thus, the book's protagonist, Ben-Sira, is said to have issued from an incestuous union between the prophet Jeremiah and his daughter. Joshua is described as a buffoon too fat to ride a horse. King David comes across as a heartless and spiteful figure who secretly delights in the death of his son Absalom, while putting on a disingenuous public display of grief. The book is consistently sounding the praises of hypocritical and insincere behaviour.

 

So shocking and abhorrent are some of the contents of "the Alphabet of Ben-Sira" that modern scholars have been at a loss to explain why anyone would have written such a book. Some see it as an impious digest of risqué folk-tales. Others have suggested that it was a polemical broadside aimed at Christians, Karaites, or some other opposing movement. I personally would not rule out the possibility that it was actually an anti-Jewish satire--though, to be sure, it did come to be accepted by the Jewish mystics of medieval Germany; and amulets to fend off the vengeful Lilith became an essential protection for newborn infants in many Jewish communities.

 

Eventually the tale of Lilith was included in a popular English-language compendium of Rabbinic legend, and some uncritical readers--unable or unwilling to check after the editor's sources--cited it as a representative Rabbinic statement on the topic. As tends to happen in such instances, subsequent authors kept copying from one another until the original error turned into an unchallenged historical fact.

 

Certainly there are volumes of real texts and traditions that could benefit from a searching and critical feminist analysis, and it is a shame to focus so much intellectual energy on a dubious and uncharacteristic legend of this sort.

I'm going to try to find any articles or books on the original pagan lilith...
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Hey I'm having some trouble findings some books on lilith (that aren't by scholars). Could anyone give any recommendations? Anything on Mithras would be good as well?

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Hey I'm having some trouble findings some books on lilith (that aren't by scholars). Could anyone give any recommendations? Anything on Mithras would be good as well?

Are you saying you want books that aren't written by scholars? What types of things are you interested in?

 

mwc

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Hey I'm having some trouble findings some books on lilith (that aren't by scholars). Could anyone give any recommendations? Anything on Mithras would be good as well?

Are you saying you want books that aren't written by scholars? What types of things are you interested in?

 

mwc

LOL. My fault. I meant to say that most of the books I'm finding on lilith are by pagans, fictional writer or feminist. Many of these writers change the story and show no documentation for how they got it. I would like some scholarly books about lilith, and the mystery religions though. This way I can know the history etc.

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LOL. My fault. I meant to say that most of the books I'm finding on lilith are by pagans, fictional writer or feminist. Many of these writers change the story and show no documentation for how they got it. I would like some scholarly books about lilith, and the mystery religions though. This way I can know the history etc.

 

This makes a bit more sense. :) I know I had some nice mythology ebooks with Lilith in them but I believe they were lost way back when my computer died last year. I'll do some digging and let you know if I can locate them (I pulled out that hard drive since it was flaky...I'll have to go find it and put it back in in order to look for these files so it might be a few days).

 

mwc

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