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I Want To Keep My Job, But Is It Really Worth This?!


Rhia
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So I'm currently at work in my school's library, and although I'm not "out" to these people, I knew it would be only a matter of time until religious matters would be discussed with my input desired.

 

As it so happens, I was presented with a "tract" by a very sweet older man who is a staff at the library where I work (damn the sweet ones, it makes it harder to say no!). I did not engage him, or even respond with anything but a thank-you, but managed to get a copy of it online (he was more than willing to give my "mom" a word-document copy since she's so far away).

 

So yeah, "mom", I think you need to see this.

 

I'm absolutely terrified to even say to these people that I'm an atheist, they all assume that I'm a Christian, and I don't wish to get on anyone's bad side when my paycheck is involved! When this older man asked if I was part of any church, I didn't want to cause a possible scene, so I said that I was too busy with my research lately. I know, I'm a total douche-bag for using that lame excuse and not just coming out and saying, "no, I don't attend church because I'd rather not be forced to sit and listen to sycophantic blathering about an undead man in the sky desperately needing your prayers and praise lest he send you to a fire-filled hell to suck satan's cock and have burning pokers shoved up your asses ".

 

I didn't even do my going insane bit that freaks everyone out, because I want to keep my job.

 

Anyway, I'm going to post this both as a quote and a file, in case someone doesn't want to download the attachment.

 

BORN AGAIN

 

 

 

 

Many are familiar with Jesus’ teaching concerning the new birth. John 3:1-18 tells of a ruler of the Jews who came by night to ask Jesus what he needed to do to enter the kingdom of God. Jesus tells Nicodemus that in order to enter the kingdom of God, one must be “born again” (v.3). He explains this new birth further: “Unless one is born of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God” (v.5).

 

The apostle Paul in writing to Titus (3:5) refers to this new birth as a “washing of regeneration and renewing by the Holy Spirit.” Paul, writing to the Christians at Corinth (I Cor. 15:1-4), says they were saved by the GOSPEL message which he preached: “that Christ died for our sins, that He was buried, and that He was raised on the third day according to the Scriptures.”

 

Paul in Romans 6:17-18 says we’re saved by obeying from the heart a form (similarity) of the teaching delivered (death, burial, and resurrection). Rom. 6:1-6 explains this likeness or form that we “obey from the heart”: (1) As Christ died on the cross for our sins, we must crucify the old life of sin v.6 ; (2) As Jesus was buried, we too are buried with Him by baptism into His death [where the blood shed in His death might wash away our sins] v.3 ; (3) As Christ was raised by the power of God, we also are raised with Him to walk a new life v.4.

 

Christ’s teaching (John 3) about the new birth is figurative language. Paul’s teaching (Rom.6) regarding our obeying a likeness of the GOSPEL message is meaningful but is largely figurative. BUT, Jesus, after His death, burial, and resurrection, gave His apostles a “great commission” that applies to every Christian: Go proclaim the good news of salvation to every individual in all nations – those who believe, repent, and are baptized shall be saved. (Matt. 28:18-20; Mark 16:15-16; Luke 24:46-47).

 

After Jesus ascended back to heaven, He sent forth (as He had promised) the Holy Spirit to the apostles “to guide them into all truth.” Acts:2 describes this outpouring of the Holy Spirit and the great events that followed: The apostle Peter, as the main spokesman on Pentecost, has convincingly proclaimed that Jesus is the risen Messiah. He told them that they (by the hands of the Roman soldiers) had crucified and slain the Lord of glory, but God had raised Him from the dead and set Him at his right hand in the heavens.

 

“When the multitude heard this, they were cut to the heart and said to Peter and the other apostles, ‘Brothers, what shall we do?’” Peter replied, “Repent and be baptized, everyone of you, in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins. And you shall receive the gift of the Holy Spirit …” Acts 2:37-38). Peter continued exhorting them and “those who accepted his message were baptized, and about three thousand were added to their number that day.” 2:41). “…and the Lord continued to add to their number daily those who were being saved.” 2:47.

 

This first gospel sermon in the name of a crucified and resurrected savior clearly sets forth (in non-figurative language) our Lord’s will regarding being saved and being added to the body of Christ – the church. Paul the apostle expresses our coming into this saved relationship in these words: “You are all sons of God through faith in Christ Jesus, for all of you who were baptized into Christ have clothed yourselves with Christ.” Galatians 3:26-27). Also look carefully at I Peter 1:18-23, which gives another picture of the new birth.

 

Weather it’s the Word of Peter, Paul, or our Lord Jesus, the message is clear: You must be Born Again to enter into eternal life!

 

 

PLEASE NOTE:

 

There is perfect harmony between Peter’s message on Pentecost regarding salvation and Paul’s instruction concerning death, burial and resurrection to a new life, and Jesus’ teaching regarding being born again.

 

 

 

P.S.

 

After writing this “appeal” while on vacation, July 2006, it occurred to me that should someone desire to respond, there is no point of contact. ---Churches of Christ, around the world are independent, non-denominational groups of Christians striving to honor God by introducing people to Jesus because “there is salvation in no one else; for there is no other name under heaven that has been given among men, by which we must be saved.” Acts 4:12). We make it our aim to worship Biblically, encourage one another, and care for those in need.

 

If I or any member of the church can be helpful, please call or write; we want you to worship and serve with us!

 

 

In sincere love,

 

Bob Brown

 

The church meets at

 

590 W. Valley Forge Road

 

King of Prussia, PA 19406

 

610-337-7314

 

Anyway, he also gave me a brochure of his church, but since I can't put that up, I'll be providing the church's website, which can be found here. It just screams cult...

 

 

Anyway, I only have 15 minutes to finish everything up for myself before I leave. So any comments, mockery, or ideas of how I can evade this happening without screwing around with my job would be helpful.

BORN_AGAIN.doc

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I know, I'm a total douche-bag for using that lame excuse and not just coming out and saying, "no, I don't attend church because I'd rather not be forced to sit and listen to sycophantic blathering about an undead man in the sky desperately needing your prayers and praise lest he send you to a fire-filled hell to suck satan's cock and have burning pokers shoved up your asses ".

 

I don't think that's the case at all. Nor do I think you should need to say all that.

 

For the purpose of work, I've found it best to simply not volunteer information. If someone asks me if I go to X church or am a member of X religion, I simply answer "no." If they ask why, I respond "it's not for me."

 

Now, personally, if they ask me directly if I'm an atheist, I'll affirm it--but that's just me. I'm fortunate to have never been in a situation where I felt that information might endanger my employment status. If I were, it would be the easiest thing in the world to simply respond with something along the lines of "I fail to see how that's any of your business, or in any way necessary to my/our effective performance as employees."

 

This is, of course, a one-size-fits-all-poorly response.

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From the site

 

There are three elders currently serving the congregation at King of Prussia. They are: Bob Brown and Paul Daniel..

 

Three?

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Well it sounds like a tough situation...but I have to agree with some of the responses. I would say since it involves your job, I would just avoid the subject and they can assume whatever they want. Sometimes the tension and argument would not be worth it especially if it involves employment. There's always a time and place to talk about your beliefs, I would try to keep it out of work the best you can.

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Dear Rhia,

 

I hate telling an untruth generally... but if I were in your situation, I definitely not only would be tempted to do exactly that, but I also would have no ethical problems with it. Considering how likely it seems that your co-workers will condemn you simply for not being a jebus cultist like them, methinks they aren't exactly the kind of people that deserves decent treatment.

I'd still have a hard time lying to them, but at least my conscience wouldn't be the problem here.

 

Aside from that, I agree with what's been posted so far. If your job depends on it, and if it's generally hard for an atheist to find a job in or around your place, you'll be better off just playing along. Keep as far away from them as possible (where their cult is concerned) but if absolutely necessary pretend you're a cultist. Yeah it sucks, but hopefully it won't have to last forever.

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Just from what I've read, your job does not appear to be in any sort of jeopardy.

 

Their will always be oafs who want to inappropriately convert you to their religious beliefs, but they have to deal with a range of people from folks like you, to total, off the wall fundies, who may or may not be of the same cult variety they are. Thus, in most (but not all) cases, they have to keep it at least toned down enough to avoid getting sanctioned like in Christine's shop.

 

I don't impose my lack of xian beliefs on them, nor my opinion of president Bush, nor discussions about hemorrhoids, that I don't like their latest hairstyle, or my personal sexual fantasies. For someone like this guy, I don't engage him, but merely put him off with short, monotone, non-informative responses, and leave him to the the inappropriate one, but that's just me. The more it gets out of hand, of course, the more you might need to do or say something. I don't think there's a standard "right" answer as to what to do or say, it varies with the situation and people's style and temperaments.

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Just from what I've read, your job does not appear to be in any sort of jeopardy.

 

Their will always be oafs who want to inappropriately convert you to their religious beliefs, but they have to deal with a range of people from folks like you, to total, off the wall fundies, who may or may not be of the same cult variety they are. Thus, in most (but not all) cases, they have to keep it at least toned down enough to avoid getting sanctioned like in Christine's shop.

 

I don't impose my lack of xian beliefs on them, nor my opinion of president Bush, nor discussions about hemorrhoids, that I don't like their latest hairstyle, or my personal sexual fantasies. For someone like this guy, I don't engage him, but merely put him off with short, monotone, non-informative responses, and leave him to the the inappropriate one, but that's just me. The more it gets out of hand, of course, the more you might need to do or say something. I don't think there's a standard "right" answer as to what to do or say, it varies with the situation and people's style and temperaments.

IF you can combine those two, you'll have the base idea for the most niche website outside of gay clown porn...

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The problem is, the man who gave me the materials is a boss of mine. He's not the one who actually tells me what to do, but he's above me enough that if he had a problem with me, I could be terminated. All of my bosses are Christians, since I'm working at my college's library, which happens to be a Christian college. I'm "out" all over campus (or so I assumed), but for some reason I guess word hasn't gotten to them. I think at this point it's a good thing. The problem is, if I am caught as being an Atheist, they can and will fire me, because my student worker agreement says so. I signed the damned thing without reading the whole thing, because I was in a hurry to get the housing forms signed so I could stay on campus (I had nowhere to go this summer but where I am now). I didn't realize until after I had signed and turned in the paper, that what I had signed was an agreement that if I was caught with a non-Christian attitude, or participating in non-Christian actions, that I could be forthwith terminated of my job immediately if my bosses so do wish.

 

I prefer staying silent than pretending vocally, but it's hard to do when one of my bosses is handing me his phone number and a brochure to his church and telling me that I need a church home, and insisting that I go to his. Luckily, the library staff are aware of the research I'm working on, as I've been in need of their services frequently; so the excuse of "weekends are my only time to work on my research" wasn't a lie, and wasn't a problem.

 

I hate lying, as I see it as a very Christian thing to do - to give witness to falsehood for the "purpose of the Kingdom"; but right now, I'm hoping that my silence will not be seen as a lie if in fact they discover my lack of belief. It's not something that I wish announce at the moment, but it feels smothering to be viewed as something I'm not, and to be expected to play the part. I just hope that they don't ever ask me to pray out loud, because then I would not have a problem with coming up with something stupid, silly, or arrogant for the hell of it.

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Rhia, it's always okay to tell people that you aren't comfortable discussing certain topics with people outside your immediate family. And you can add that it makes you uncomfortable, as though someone were asking to see you without your clothes on.

 

 

If you can tear up, and blush good after saying this (which you might as you may be kinda, sorta, lying)....it's pure gold. If anything, to the religiously minded, you come across in their warped mentality of being a deeply religious person....yet you've said NOTHING of the sort! People will always believe what they want to believe, and when it comes to the workplace....sorry to say atheism just isn't out of the closet quite yet (though with the death of Falwell....the door might have a chance to creak open).

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Rhia,

 

Ummm.. "Big Fuckin' Hairy Deal". Tracts and paper they are printed on cannot hurt you until they are warrants..

 

Lots of good advise above on how to deal with the *old geezer*. The *why* you do this is as important a tool to understand and use as the methods.

 

"Pick your fights carefully". This is a fight, a battle in which you have everything to loose, little to win, and nothing to help you resource-wise.

You cannot win a fight with this olde_phuck, so don't fight him. Let this evangelizing pass over you like water. It may 'get you some wet', but it will not hurt you.

 

The point is? They want to control you (ref: damn near every anti-testimony of excape from the various religious borgs), want your presence, tithes, help with the assembly and your pretty smile in a sea of idiots beggin' the pastor/preacher/reverend for more godd_sprecche.

 

Do what you have to do educationally wise until you've got resourses to get the fuck outa the xtian_klown_skulle, err, college.

Get the time in, and see what transfers to an institution you'd prefer to attend. If you can't do this, then 'grin and bear it'.

 

Best you can do when confronted with a herd of stampeding buffalo is run in the general direction and hope like fuck you don't get trampled, OR not be in the vicinity of the herd in first place. Sounds as though you are in the middle of a herd. Prepare to excape, but make sure your job, living quarters and life aren't going to be yarded out from under you suddenly.

 

I like the advise "Oh thats a matter our family talks about in private, thanks". Makes the 'authority' xtians so love to speak of come down from a distant and hopefully uncheckable source. Play their game, flow along until you can get off the ride..

 

Live well knowing you will be able to leave and not have to look back, or be dependent on the SkuLLe for the rest of your life..

 

One trick to being a rebel is to be 'the same' while the *officals* are looking.. "I'm not the droid you are looking for.."

 

kL

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You are in a pickle of a situation. But college is not the real world. You'll have your chance to be yourself, once you are on the outside.

 

*waving hand back and forth * "I am not the Athiest you are looking for." The new and improved Skip has it right. The best thing you can learn from this is the art of knowing when to fight and when to hide amongst the crowds, just like Jesus would do when the Romans were trying to catch him.

 

Keep your chin up, and know there are a lot of people pulling for you to survive and make it into the real world.

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I've found it best to not discuss religious matters at work, period. If someone asks me I simply say I don't care to discuss that particular subject or that I don't have time. At work, the time excuse is probably the best one. But sometimes I've found I need to be firm with strong evangelicals and say that religion and politics are topics I don't discuss with co-workers.

 

You could always look for a new job off-campus so you can simply resign instead of having to worry about them finding out.

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