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I Hate Computers And Allied Gear


nivek
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As a first-level PC supporter I wholeheartedly agree :fdevil:

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I have a love hate relationship. By and large computers are, if you know how to use them, one of the last great tools of freedom of information... Although I don't often bother with paranoiac identity hiding, it's not hard these days...

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Seems the barn burningly fas Barracuda 10k/rpm SCSI drives I depend on no longer are supported by the company I do my service contracting with.

 

It breaks? They send overnight a new one. Server box is now in parts, on the shop table, looking like a mechanized MASH episode, but waiting for the final bullet..

Service company seems to have forgotten that WinderzZ users also use RAID/SCSI and WinXP Pro, an unlikely combination, but I putter with things rather than play *expert*.

 

After waiting since Tuesday morning, two wrong deliveries, and totally incorrect parts, told the good folks, who are now outsourced for their tech-lines to OuterSlobbian sources, to "go thee and stuff thineselves.."

 

Will go to where ever I can find some inexpensive ATA-EIDE drives, rebuild this RAID array with something reallLLllLLllLLlllllllly cheap..

 

Using my 600mHz laptop, 192 megs of RAM, build on shitty vid and sound, but I'm online..

 

Dislike working on my own gear, my partner took a real_day_job, isn't around to unfuck this mess now found in..

 

This is official notice, daFatman HATES computers..

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pw-BGBdB2Qk Enjoy this puter related vid..

 

kFL

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Computers aren't the issues... it's money grubbing arseholes who outsource to Elbonia and only pay enough for in uteros with head sets...

 

On topic... check E-bay, if you have credit card (if not I pmed you on methods of how to get round that :) )

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pw-BGBdB2Qk Enjoy this puter related vid..

 

That was soooo old, he's referring to the Macs of old. I've not experienced any of the shut-down, blue screen of death, no drivers available, system error/error code.....rubbish that I experienced day in and day out with Windows.

 

In the two years I've been using a Mac now, I've had no programs shut down and experienced no problems. That was a common occurance on my Windows machine.

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Nivek,

 

Most home-built servers I've done with RAID I used SATA drives and HighPoint Rocket RAID card. http://www.highpoint-tech.com/USA/sataraid.htm. Cheap, and you just buy any new drive or replace the card. Easy to use. I probably have 3 or 4 machines using this, and it works great. Had to replace probably 2 harddisks (cheap refurbished ones) over the last couple of years.

 

I think their 4 disk RAID controller is around 99 bucks. The SATA disks goes for somewhere between 50-100 bucks each, and they give you 200 MB and more.

 

(Btw, I love+hate computers too. But I mostly hate Windows and Microsoft licensing. I'm migrating quickly over to Linux setups and only run Windows as virtual machines in Linux hosts. That way i don't need to re-register/re-purchase for re-installation. No reinstallation ever needed for Windows anymore. Just move Virtual disk file.)

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I've seen my first BSOD in about 5 years since I moved to Vista Home Premium.

No way! Wow! I have no experience with Vista yet (besides helping my wife with her new laptop) but I thought M$ had made a more stable OS, but I guess not...

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More than half of what I run isn't 'Vista compatible' yet... so I'm having to run it in XP kernel mode with Admin access to the registry.

 

As to 'more stable' or even 'new'... Vista looks like KDE on Linux or BSD.

 

As a point of record, I'm not a Vista user by choice, my old laptop died, so I bought the cheapest branded one I could find... Compaq Presario F500

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It sucks Gramp, that we (consumers) are forced to "upgrade" to a new version that we might not want. Especially when most drivers are missing and it isn't even much better than the old one. Is there anything in Vista that would make anyone say "Oh, I have to have that one"? I suspect not.

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NVidia card... and it's a tale told by an idiot... full of sound and fury and signifying nothing... if it doesn't run Creative ZenCast client properly, I may as well run windows 3.11

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I'm just waiting for the day OS-X or Linux gets a lion's market share of their own for computer gaming. That's the only reason I stick with Windows, and I'll happily jump ship the very moment a viable alternative is presented.

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I'm just waiting for the day OS-X or Linux gets a lion's market share of their own for computer gaming. That's the only reason I stick with Windows, and I'll happily jump ship the very moment a viable alternative is presented.

My son and I was talking about that too the other day. Is there any particular reason, besides there's more users on Windows than Linux/OSX? I don't think there has to be any technical or compatibility reasons anymore, since most of the Linux dist-s works on most hardware.

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I'm just waiting for the day OS-X or Linux gets a lion's market share of their own for computer gaming. That's the only reason I stick with Windows, and I'll happily jump ship the very moment a viable alternative is presented.

My son and I was talking about that too the other day. Is there any particular reason, besides there's more users on Windows than Linux/OSX? I don't think there has to be any technical or compatibility reasons anymore, since most of the Linux dist-s works on most hardware.

 

Things to ponder:

 

1. as long as M$ still holds the lion's share, hardware manufacturers will keep providing drivers for their stuff for M$ and maybe, if they have time and resources enough, a bit for linux. It sucks. Fortunately there are enough enthusiasts who build Linux drivers for the hardware, but it takes some time.

 

2. Linux is a complicated system, and it makes that clear. You need to gather some knowledge to make it work properly. You need to think about your decisions before you make them. You tell a Linux system to "rm -rf /" (for non-linux-geeks, is is equivalent in consequence to "format c:"), it will do so. WIthout questioning. You are, after all, the user, I'll spell it: G-O-D.

M$, on the other hand, is a complicated system... that tries its best to mask this fact so that people aren't scared off by the need to actually learn something. Ever really stopped to think about it? Yes, a M$ installation is easy to use... but what do you have to do after install? Literally masses of additional software are needed before your system can properly do what you need it to do. Sooner or later, too, you'll have to fool around with quite a few registry keys et al. In the end, as I see it, both systems are equally delicate... but M$ tries to do all the necessary thinking for you, with disastrous results.

But tell that to the user, brainwashed by "install and go" propaganda. Let's face it, this is the exact reason why countless careless users just plug in, open the gate for all the malware crap, and help flood the whole internet with spam, more malware et al. If everyone needed to know what she's doing, of course we'd have less users... but those we'd still have would know what they're doing, and botnet gangsters et cetera would have one Niflhel of a hard time.

 

Yeah I know. Just daydreaming. :vent:

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1. as long as M$ still holds the lion's share, hardware manufacturers will keep providing drivers for their stuff for M$ and maybe, if they have time and resources enough, a bit for linux. It sucks. Fortunately there are enough enthusiasts who build Linux drivers for the hardware, but it takes some time.

I think the hardware/linux situation is changing, now with more companies can preinstall Ubuntu for you. If Dell, HP etc sell them with Linux, they have to make sure they use the video card, sound cards,...etc that works. So I think it will be better and easier from now on.

 

2. Linux is a complicated system, and it makes that clear. You need to gather some knowledge to make it work properly. You need to think about your decisions before you make them. You tell a Linux system to "rm -rf /" (for non-linux-geeks, is is equivalent in consequence to "format c:"), it will do so. WIthout questioning. You are, after all, the user, I'll spell it: G-O-D.

I used Unix before Linux existed (a full enterprise system with SQL Databases and RS232 terminals.) :) I even had a Minix and played around and compiled etc, but didn't have more time and went into the M$ world for a long time. Now I'm going back to Linux again, since last year. There's a lot I missed.

 

Minix was the core unix that Linus Torvalds used to start building Linux on. We probably bought it at the same time, but obviously he saw an opportunity, and I didn't. The Minix C-compiler didn't support float numbers and a lot of other things were missing in the kernel too.

 

I've done my fair share of "rm" mistakes. Here's one I did on a Sparc I station: rm -r .* to delete my hidden files, but of course it would start removing files everywhere, at least back then before the forced flag came in. I didn't notice my mistake until I got the error message: "Can not delete rm, locked by another process". Then I said "Oh, SHIT!!!" I had a backup, and only lost a weeks work. :~

 

M$, on the other hand, is a complicated system... that tries its best to mask this fact so that people aren't scared off by the need to actually learn something. Ever really stopped to think about it? Yes, a M$ installation is easy to use... but what do you have to do after install? Literally masses of additional software are needed before your system can properly do what you need it to do. Sooner or later, too, you'll have to fool around with quite a few registry keys et al. In the end, as I see it, both systems are equally delicate... but M$ tries to do all the necessary thinking for you, with disastrous results.

Totally agree.

 

And M$ pisses me off when it comes to development tools too. I started to use Visual Studio from the beginning, and made a system in Dotnet 1.0. Then 1.1 came out, and I upgraded, all was fine. Then 2.0 in Visual Studio 2005 came out, and all of a sudden they had added a whole bunch of cool things... but they also removed support for a bunch of important old things. I had to spend weeks and months extra, because the modules I had did compile and work under 2.0 still, but if I had to change or modify one module where I've used some of the old stuff, I had to convert it and remove the old components and rewrite the module in the new way. (If anyone wonders what part it is, it's the whole damn Data Object/DataSet and now ObjectDataSource and the new way how DataSet works with TableAdapters etc.) That got me so pissed that we started to talk about converting to J2EE instead, but it will take too much work right now.

 

But tell that to the user, brainwashed by "install and go" propaganda. Let's face it, this is the exact reason why countless careless users just plug in, open the gate for all the malware crap, and help flood the whole internet with spam, more malware et al. If everyone needed to know what she's doing, of course we'd have less users... but those we'd still have would know what they're doing, and botnet gangsters et cetera would have one Niflhel of a hard time.

 

Yeah I know. Just daydreaming. :vent:

It's the reason why they've been successful. Easy to install, easy to use, but a nightmare for the professional, because the common user outnumbers the professional with 10 to 1.

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Exactly.

 

There's the pragmatic part of my brain that tells me "You spend more than enough time using computers to justify learning how to troubleshoot and fix them yourself."

 

I realize the truth of that, and I would like to learn such one of these days. Truth is, though, I've no aspiration of any kind toward being a computer wiz. It'd be nice to be able to fix my own problems and such, but ultimately, I just want to play my games.

 

Unfortunately, Windows gives me the best and easiest way to do that.

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Look at it this way... if it was hard, I'd never have started it. There again, if it was easy, no one would pay...

 

but looking at the monkeys who earn a living at it these days, it's not that hard even, just like the clergy, they make it mysterious.

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Damn you and your logic, Gramps! Why won't you just let me be lazy? :HaHa:

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