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Jesus Freak Candidates.


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Honestly, I don't know who to vote for in this upcoming Presidential election, because all of them are fundamentalist Jesus Freaks. I got nothing out of the debates outside of who has a stronger belief in a make believe Jesus. It was so FUCKING ridiculous. And the fact that they took lightning striking the building as a sign that "God" is pro-life was unbelieveable. Those morons should realize that hundreds of people are struck by lightning a YEAR. So fucking what if Guilani said he's pro-choice and thunder rumbles?

 

Aside from that I find it very frightening that in order to be elected President of a super power you have to consort with an imaginary super being as opposed to be well educated, well spoken, and taking an interest in the citizens of America. I guess we are well on our way to living in a theocracy. I just find it unbelieveable that a bunch of old ass adults are considered credible simply because they believe in a book of fairy tales...And then have the audacity to proclaim, on national television, that they don't believe in evolution(which can be proven)...

 

I just needed to get that out. Bleah! :Doh:

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I doubt that they all genuinely believe the bullshit. It's the same with the music industry: Thank God, Get New Fans. If I were running for office I'd seriously consider faking a religious belief to get an easy 25-50% approval (25% for dems, 50% for reps).

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You'd do more for your country by playing video games than lining up on Election Day :jerkit:

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I doubt that they all genuinely believe the bullshit. [...] If I were running for office I'd seriously consider faking a religious belief to get an easy 25-50% approval (25% for dems, 50% for reps).

 

Agreed. Around here, if you wanna get elected to anything, you've gotta profess Christianity. Period. But part of politics is pragmatically compromising on issues you consider peripheral in order to make a difference on those you consider important.

 

Assuming both candidates show some basic qualifications that allow them to say "I'm running for office" without causing audiences to collapse from laughter; both are the official candidates of the two major political parties; neither commits a catastrophic blunder during the campaign; neither has positions that are so extreme as to inspire voters to wonder, "what the hell are you smoking?"; and it's not a race in which one of the candidates is also the incumbent of such long standing that s/he may as well be called "officeholder for life" (e.g., 20 year members of the US House) ... about the biggest margin you're ever going to see in any race is 65/35 (e.g., LBJ in 1964). I don't think any voter's going to be terribly impressed by a candidate simply professing Christianity, but considering how many percentage points a candidate could lose by professing atheism, they just can't afford to not play the church game. So sure, if I wanted to get in public office -- if some other issue X was really important to me, I thought I could have a positive impact on that issue, I believed that I was the right person to do it, and also that it needed to be done -- I'd think twice before putting "Godless Heretic" on my campaign literature. ;)

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You'd do more for your country by playing video games than lining up on Election Day :jerkit:

 

QF fucking T.

 

Even more than religion, the grand, flashy bread and circus our government performs every November 7 is truly the opiate of the masses.

 

"Prayer Voting is like a rocking chair..." :jerkit:

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In Australia, voting is compulsory for all elections. I don't agree with that. However there is no law against an informal vote. You can put whatever you want on the ballot paper. I write: "I DON'T KNOW WHICH DOPE TO VOTE FOR".

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Maybe this is the place to post it. Earlier today I was reading a book with the title Bible in America. Finally I understand some core characteristics of Americans. America is a Christian nation. In God we trust. Arguments as to whether or not Christians started the country. Etc.

 

This book tells me that the Puritans who first settled in the US and who wrote the first rules, left England with the intention to set up a theocracy. A century and a half later, their ideals had spread from that first little corner of the continent to the entire community that identified with them. I'm not clear on my history as to how far west that went.

 

That book was published in 1982. Probably written earlier. I guess that is why there is no reference to the renewal of fundamentalism in the US. It sounds as though over-zealousness for religion is a thing of the past that needs to be explained.

 

That's why I checked to see when it was written. Over-zealousness for religion is so completely not a thing of the past. Twenty-five years ago it might have seemed like it was. That was quite a while before 9/11.

 

Seems this world needs something to be deadly frightened about. It used to be the Cold War. That ended unexpectedly. I didn't even know how to cope in a world with no Cold War. We got a good decade in which to get used to feeling really secure. Then 9/11 hit. And the world will never be the same.

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Even more than religion, the grand, flashy bread and circus our government performs every November 7 is truly the opiate of the masses.

 

You fucking said it.

 

Like hell if I'm wasting any more time supporting a thoroughly corrupt and irredeemable system, or deceiving myself that by doing so I can magically make self-serving human beings into responsible statesman. I've done enough of that, so this election - and every election- I will vote with my finger :vtffani:

 

Can't rely on politicians to do what's right, so no point in supporting them.

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One more thing that might or might not be relevant. The day after 9/11 happened I was in class. Also the day before. The day before was the first day of my class in sociology of religion. That day the prof mentioned holy wars and asked whether we think war still happens because of religion. No one really knew much to say in response to the question. It seemed to me like something so far outside of reality as not to even warrent discussion. I promptly forgot the question.

 

The day after, the prof reminded us about this question that he had asked. He concluded that we now have our answer. It was a very solemn class that day. It seemed like a funeral service. And it was. It was the end of the world as we (all of us in that room) had known it. All of us had been born since the world wars. As I write this post I keep asking myself if this really is what life was like before 9/11. The answer is Yes. At least for me.

 

I had grown up on stories of World War 2 because my parents remembered it so well. They talked about it so much that I felt like I had missed out on something signficant. Their parents remembered the first world war. The closest thing that ever happened in my time was the Vietnam War and all I ever found out about it was titles in the newspaper. I tried telling myself that it was close enough to count.

 

As an adult, I gave very much thought to the question about war. By the late 1990s I concluded that society had evolved so far that no one would go to war even if there were a reason. I remember exactly where I was and who my audience was when I said that out loud. After 9/11 I felt confident that the USA was too mature, too sophisticated, to retaliate. After all, I'd been facing up to my own family without retaliating no matter how horrible they treated me when I left the church. Surely, people worthy of government office would know better than to strike back.

 

Not until the bombs were actually being dropped in Afghanistan did I believe that anyone would go to war over 9/11. I didn't know that Christians had so little faith--North America is a Christian land, right? Yes, so I thought. I had been raised on the mighty acts of God. Surely an almighty God was strong enough to protect the us from further acts of terror and life would go back to normal. I had no idea that one bunch of crazy religious fanatics could create another. Today I am amazed that the world waited as long as it did to start dropping bombs. Apparently, religion makes people who retaliate.

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Aside from that I find it very frightening that in order to be elected President of a super power you have to consort with an imaginary super being as opposed to be well educated, well spoken, and taking an interest in the citizens of America.

Sadly, abunch of dumbfucks expect it. I can only dream of being President one day, and refusing to end the swearing in speach with "so help me god." And when people bitch, I'll simply show them the laws that supposedly run this nation. Too bad they still wont believe me.

 

I wish my anti-religious right political works done good. I hope it makes a difference, but in the end, the government is corrupt, biased, and a piece of shit.

 

As far as voting, I'm sure the God thing is just an attempt to win votes, especially the Dems. I do know a few people, myself included, that either are going to, or seriously look into, moving to Canada if a Republican wins the '08 election. McCain, Romney, and especially Guliani will do nothing but bring this nation to another level of damnation.

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As far as voting, I'm sure the God thing is just an attempt to win votes, especially the Dems. I do know a few people, myself included, that either are going to, or seriously look into, moving to Canada if a Republican wins the '08 election. McCain, Romney, and especially Guliani will do nothing but bring this nation to another level of damnation.

 

If you'd have caught me just a year or two ago, I'd likely have said the same thing.

 

As it is, I don't believe this nation's going to Hell in the proverbial hand basket quite that quickly. That it's in a state of rapid decline, and said decline is nearly irreversible I'd not dream of arguing. Even at 21 years old, though, I've gone through and suffered from enough hysterics to realize it's extremely rare for a government to make the kind of overnight transition to total oppression many people (somewhat rightly) fear--let alone do so successfully. We are, by and large, a nation of sheep, but there are enough goats among the flocks to yet merit a slow, cautious approach.

 

All that said, I have every intention of getting the hell out of here within the next few years (as soon as I get my bachelor's degree), but now I'm motivated just as much by excitement for what lay ahead as fear of what lay behind.

 

Maybe this is the place to post it. Earlier today I was reading a book with the title Bible in America. Finally I understand some core characteristics of Americans. America is a Christian nation. In God we trust. Arguments as to whether or not Christians started the country. Etc.

 

This book tells me that the Puritans who first settled in the US and who wrote the first rules, left England with the intention to set up a theocracy. A century and a half later, their ideals had spread from that first little corner of the continent to the entire community that identified with them. I'm not clear on my history as to how far west that went.

 

This is exactly what so frustrates those of us with even a rudimentary understanding of the U.S. constitution and the intentions of the founders in drafting it.

 

The United States of America isn't supposed to be a Christian nation. The divide between the beliefs and aspirations of the pilgrims and the later immigrants who did the greatest part of the work of founding and building the nation is so stark it's practically a solid wall.

 

Unfortunately, on the level of large (national) populations, fear trumps the will to be free. It always has.

 

So no matter how many Jeffersonian visionaries come along and once again spread the value of freedom, eventually the message will become too popular for its own good. Herd mentality will take over, and concerns over "security" will once again slowly wear away at the edifice then the foundation of those ideals of freedom until there is nothing left.

 

I daresay that's why libertarians almost universally feel the driving need for independence and self-sufficiency in tandem with their desires for personal freedom. As human beings, we undoubtedly have a psychological need for the companionship of other humans, but we don't necessarily need the herd.

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I came across this article today that's somewhat relevant to this topic. On page 2 it lists some stats that suggest a greater percentage of Americans believe religious influence has gone too far, a greater percentage than those who consider themselves atheist. Also, it touches on the religious proclamations of the top 3 democratic candidates.

 

http://www.thenation.com/doc/20070625/aronson

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