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What God Or Gods Do You Believe In?


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We've got the Spirituality thread, so here's the theism thread.

 

What kinds of deity do you believe in?

 

 

I myself am a panentheist. It's sort of like pantheism--the idea that the universe is God and God is the universe--but with a twist. I believe that there is more to God than just the universe. God is the essence of the being of the universe, but even if you were able to add up everything in the universe, you still wouldn't have God. God is both immanent in the world as we can see and understand it, and transcendent to our understanding.

 

I do not believe that God can be described as a person, male or female, or by any anthropomorphic terminology.

 

 

As far as gods go--Zeus, Thor, Jehovah, etc.--I'm rather agnostic. It'd be neat, but I couldn't say for sure whether or not they're around.

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Over the years I've made quite a few friends in the community of gods.

 

The first goddess I discovered was Athena. Something about an intelligent woman with fighting and tactical skills really appeals to me.

 

Hinduism continues to fascinate me. Shiva, Durga, Kali and Ganesha resonate most strongly with me.

 

My dearest friend from Buddhism (and various Buddhist/folk religion hybrids) is Guan Shi Yin, the bodhisattva of mercy. I consider her my sister.

 

But my primary allegiance is to the Norse gods, with particularly strong links to Odin, Freyja, Thor and Loki.

 

Overall I think that non-omnipotent gods are much more likely than the omni variety.

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The only God I could possibly believe in is a scientist creating a universe (multi-verse scenario)... seriously. This is actually being considered and has basis in theoretical physics :HaHa:

And even further, maybe time and existence is recursive or in an infinite loop, and we are the creation of what a future scientist will do. We are our own gods, and in a distant future I will write this post again, and again, and again...

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Oh. I can see us there... right there... to the left... no, not there, a little to the right now... yeah, that's our universe there in that little spot. :)

 

Btw, to answer the OP, I believe in the Universe and Existence. I don't believe the Universe is "aware" or "intelligent" per se, but heck, who knows.

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My dearest friend from Buddhism (and various Buddhist/folk religion hybrids) is Guan Shi Yin, the bodhisattva of mercy. I consider her my sister.

 

You know, however, that none of the Buddhist bodhisattvas are considered actual entities/deities/gods. They are all just teaching aids. :grin:

 

I'll go with HanSolo's answer. :3:

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As is obvious from my sig et al, I honor the Divine as represented by the High Gods of the North - Odin, Thor, Freya et al.

Which does not necessarily mean that I think they personally exist with all the traits the sagas ascribe to them... just that I think they are good representations of the Divine. And I don't rule out the possibility of other deities existing.

Not the morontheist ones though. There's a difference between "unprovable" and "fucking absurd" :pureevil:

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My Patrons are Thor, Anubis, Morrigan, and Hekate, even though I honor more than just them.

 

As for Lucifer, he is a figure I honor, and see as a great role model. And, if I still accepted the Bible to be true, I would be a Luciferian.

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Depends on whose book I'm currently reading.

 

I love all the god systems. Especially the obviously fake ones (thinking The Endless, the Flying Speghetti Monster, the Discordians, etc).

 

In fact, I have come to the personal conclusion that if a god system can not make me laugh, then it cannot possibly be real...even in fiction. Worst writers are religious writers who take themselves seriously.

 

Give me a Taoist bear full of fluff anyday.

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Hmmm...I tend to go with a force backing everything (the Tao would probably be closest in concept) and that certain ways of interacting with it can be through what some call Dieties. Very MPD, if you think about it too much.

 

As for actual named god(ess)s that I tend to like and work with, I have to go with Hephaestus and Athena as my primarys (I have a major technological bent), along with Tyche. I've also looked into Legba and Ptah as well.

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You know, however, that none of the Buddhist bodhisattvas are considered actual entities/deities/gods. They are all just teaching aids. :grin:

:HaHa: Doesn't stop Sis from giving me good advice. Including my favourite, "Don't stand in front of moving trains." (figuratively *or* literally).

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You know, however, that none of the Buddhist bodhisattvas are considered actual entities/deities/gods. They are all just teaching aids. :grin:

:HaHa: Doesn't stop Sis from giving me good advice. Including my favourite, "Don't stand in front of moving trains." (figuratively *or* literally).

 

 

:grin:

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I was informed of this new area, so I decided to come back and check it out.

 

What kind of God? Well, it's certainly not some judgemental being up in the sky. I can be annoyingly New Age about these things.

 

1. God is God, and therefore God has anything God could possibly want. Because of this, God wants nothing. God cannot want anything, since the moment God thought of it, it would be there.

2. God is the Ultimate Source from which all things originate. I believe in a sort of panentheism, whereby God, while being God, is also inherent in everything that exists. To me, the Big Bang was the physical manifestation of God; since everything came from that point, all things originate in God.

3. There is no salvation. No judgement. God wouldn't have any plausible reason to judge us. Also because of this, there is no "one true religion" or even "one true philosophy". Because God manifests in so many different ways each individual person is going to have a different journey and experience. Also, we are free to pursue whatever as we please. God will not force "godliness" on us; that wouldn't make sense. Salvation is only a concept that one has to arrive to oneself.

 

I feel most closely drawn to the Hindu and other Eastern pantheons because their concept of God is closest to my own. I view those gods as existing much as myself, which is, a spiritual being whose relationship to me is complicated to describe.

 

In fact, I have come to the personal conclusion that if a god system can not make me laugh, then it cannot possibly be real...even in fiction. Worst writers are religious writers who take themselves seriously.

 

Indeed. That's why I like the more polytheistic ideas about God, because they encompass ALL of the attributes that exist - our compassionate and our bloodthirsty sides, our intelligent and stupid sides, our independent and dependent sides.

 

Now I'm not saying it's okay to go out and kill somebody just because Kali or some other war god/goddess is apparently supposed to. The point is that all of these drives we have, as beings of God, can be seen as part of the complex picture that makes up godhead.

 

For example, I believe somewhat in reincarnation, and I believe that at some point we all experience both the "good" and "bad" virtues. The "godly" thing to do is not try to deny oneself or even categorize actions or experiences into "good" or "bad" but simply sum them up as a whole.

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Ultimately, like Han said, we are our own gods. My first deity is myself :)

 

Moving on, I fluctuate. Generally, I am Agnostic about the existence of gods since I can't answer the question one way or the other with absolute surety. There are times I am very Atheistic and can't accept the even the possibility of the existence of any gods. Other times, I am more sympathetic to the idea of gods and their existence, and will gravitate and focus on one or more gods, depending on my mood. I simply try to bear in mind that I do this in accordance with my needs and wants at the moment, and that helps me to not get bothered by my fluctuations.

 

During those Theistic times, I gravitate mostly towards Odin. Ancient god of wealth, wisdom, warfare, magic, death, and many other things, the demeanor of this god appeals to me most. His aesthetics are dark and his disposition can be volatile, and he walks his own path without regard to paths others might lay out for him - all traits I exhibit often. Though I find other gods (Freyja, Perun, etc) interesting and notable, Odin is closest to my heart and disposition.

 

I sympathize much with the character of Satan, due to my studies of LaVeyan Satanism and my embrace of such, but that also prevents me from regarding Satan as a deity. Abrahamic mythology is fraudulent, so I cannot help but see all its characters as pure fiction. Still, I "worship" Satan according to the proper use of the term (to give honor to), in that I accept the Satan posited by the Church of Satan and similar groups, and find it laudable, though thoroughly nontheistic and symbolic.

 

Sometimes, I wonder if the only place any gods can exist is in one's mind, with the same reality as one's dreams and thoughts, and that we may encounter them after death, but that's another story. Mostly, I feel Agnostic, but during those Theistic times, Odin is for me :)

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none :mellow:

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Guest shana

I believe a lot of gods exist, but only a few do I follow and try to honor, like my patron Goddess, Arianrhod, she is my lifeline, to the deities...

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Ultimately, like Han said, we are our own gods. My first deity is myself :)

The only difficulty is how to bow down to your self. :shrug:

 

 

 

 

:grin:

 

 

 

And truly, every believer, regardless of what faith or god(s) they have, everyone got themselves as the first and primary agent of decision, and hence their first and highest god in their life. No one can claim any external power to be a higher "god" then their own mind and opinion. So we all have the same "god".

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The only difficulty is how to bow down to your self. :shrug:

 

Yeah, I tried that before. Then I got to wondering "if I really do manage to do this, am I really going to suck my own dick?" :scratch:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nahhhh :HaHa:

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Maybe that's why yoga is a good way of achieving enlightenment? You learn to twist and turn so you end up looking up your own a** and maybe even be able to bow down to yourself??? And the sucking your own d**k, don't try it, you might get stuck in that position... :grin:

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And truly, every believer, regardless of what faith or god(s) they have, everyone got themselves as the first and primary agent of decision, and hence their first and highest god in their life. No one can claim any external power to be a higher "god" then their own mind and opinion. So we all have the same "god".

But thats what some xtians do. They say, that they do not have to think but just to follow the words writen in there holy book. And other religions do the same. Or how could they think of going to paradise by killing onself and others like some islamic fundamentalists?

Yeah, sure. In the end, they decide what they do but to recognize that, they have to start thinking firsthand.

 

Up to the topic: How du you exactly define a God?

A river has its own spirit often named Godess. But she has only control over her river. Is she a godess?

Odin is named a God and is what? What makes him a god? His eternal struggle in Ragnarök? That he knows his destiny? His Powers?

A Totemspirit is a guide and has the power ond wisdom of his species but dose that qualify for godhood?

Our ancestors have the knowledge of our families, traditions and the like. Are there spirits gods?

A great hero of the legends is known far and wide. His Name is near immortal, his deeds will inspire our grandchildren. Is he a god?

JHWH claims omnipresence and all things, he is not to be depicted and nothing we can understand. He sais, he created the world. Is that what makes a god?

 

I dont know.

 

How do I define a god? Good question.

 

The celtic gods where once human beings, our ancestors. Every hero can become a god. Some say the Sidhe are gods and in some way they are, for they are bigger, better, more. But they are claimed to be part of an older culture, that lived in Ire and disapeared with the new inhabitants, as historicans say. That way they are ancestors as well. I do believe in Brigid and Dana, in Dagda and Lugh. But they are not unreacheble for me. They are glorious heros and embodyments of princips, powers, things or doings. As are animals and riverspirits. They are my gods too. All teachers and guides, sometimes guardiens. There is a statement given to the druids, that all Gods are one and most people just not know that jet.

And, yes, I am my god if it goes for who is responceble for what I do. And, because I believe, that in every human being is a part of the allgod/everything everyone is a small god to me who owes some respect until he proves me otherwise.

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And truly, every believer, regardless of what faith or god(s) they have, everyone got themselves as the first and primary agent of decision, and hence their first and highest god in their life. No one can claim any external power to be a higher "god" then their own mind and opinion. So we all have the same "god".

But thats what some xtians do.

Some? IMO they all do, but they might not be aware of it or admit it, but their choice of "following" Jesus was made by them and in their own minds. They submitted to their own minds and their own will, so they want to do it, hence the "Will" is the real god in anyones life.

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We've got the Spirituality thread, so here's the theism thread.

 

What kinds of deity do you believe in?

 

 

I myself am a panentheist. It's sort of like pantheism--the idea that the universe is God and God is the universe--but with a twist. I believe that there is more to God than just the universe. God is the essence of the being of the universe, but even if you were able to add up everything in the universe, you still wouldn't have God. God is both immanent in the world as we can see and understand it, and transcendent to our understanding.

 

I do not believe that God can be described as a person, male or female, or by any anthropomorphic terminology.

 

 

As far as gods go--Zeus, Thor, Jehovah, etc.--I'm rather agnostic. It'd be neat, but I couldn't say for sure whether or not they're around.

 

I guess Pantheism could describe me too. I'm a completely Atheist when it comes to Zeus, Thor, and Hera, but the idea of an energy field, neither good nor evil, responsible for making up the universe is appealing to me, and something I can believe...I do believe in Karma, strongly.

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I am a Deist in the broadest sense of the word. I believe that there must be a Creator primarily because it is extremely improbable that the universe and this world came into being purely by chance with no help from an intelligent, guiding force of some kind. But, I'm not religious at all. I agree with Brother Gene Roddenberry (the creator of Star Trek) who said:

 

"I condemn false prophets, I condemn the effort to take away the power of rational decision, to drain people of their free will--and a hell of a lot of money in the bargain. Religions vary in their degree of idiocy, but I reject them all. For most people, religion is nothing more than a substitute for a malfunctioning brain."

 

I too reject all religion as obviously man-made and all holy books as obviously written by men and the products of their times. The only holy book I would consider as possibly being from God would be one that contained no errors of any kind. The bible obviously hardly qualifies as inerrant or infallible, the laughable fantasies of True Believers aside. :rolleyes: The bible does have its good parts that I can appreciate, but I find much more to appreciate in the Bhagavad-Gita, though its been quite a while since I read it.

 

My "gods" are Nature and the Universe, and of course the Holy Farter, the Magic Sky Man, and the Spook of Kryasst (who is also somehow magically Him)! My worship (which is not offered to a deity) consists of simply appreciating the beauty and the complexity and the diversity and the awesomeness of Nature. Glory!

 

I think there is a remote chance that reincarnation might be a reality, but without a soul (which I don't believe exists because there is no evidence for it) to survive the physical death of the body, how could it possibly work? It also seems unlikely to me on the basis that neuroscientists have concluded that the mind is a product of the brain - that brain activity and the mind are two terms for the same thing. If so, then when brain activity ceases, so does the mind. The NDE phenomenon used to fascinate me, but it's my understanding that the vast majority of brain researchers regard them as products of oxygen deprivation in the eyes and the brain, and that makes the most sense to me given the fact that many NDE accounts are too outlandish to be taken seriously and that the accounts are culturally biased.

 

Well, anyway, I identify myself as a Deist who doesn't believe in any religion and who doubts the reality of any sort of an afterlife.

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Everything is made of the same original elementary forces that coalesced from the big bang singularity, whether it be a photon, a star, a lump of rock, or a human being. It is only the combination, the mix of things, that makes things different from one another.

 

We, the human race, are as much a part of the universe as a spiral galaxy or a black hole, and made of the same stuff. Is it then outragous to suggest that we, as sentient beings, examining the universe, represent the universe examining itself.

 

We exist in three dimentions plus time and there are theories that suggest there are other dimentions. There is a lot more to the universe then we can perceive, we know this. Since we are made of the same thing the universe is made out of, then it's not all together improbable that we could be more than what we can observe in our limited perceptions. Perhaps, there is more to life and death then we know or can even imagine.

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