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It Can't Really Be Like This All The Time, Can It?


Skeptic
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I've only been living in the south for about a year, so I don't know much about how it is around here, but does the endless shoving of religion down one's throat ever cease or let up at all? I've encountered religion in everyday life here a lot more than I did when I lived up north, for sure. I swear, the next time I hear someone talking about god or the end of the world or some other delusion, I'm going to snap and out myself. It's going to happen eventually, I know it is. I'm so done with religion. All religions, too, not just xianity. They're all equally nonsensical. Even if the xians I met were arrogant about it, it would be better, but some of them are so humble and "turn the other cheek" about it. The guy yesterday that was spouting his mouth off was talking about some kid or something who ran away from his mother (I couldn't understand him very well) and he brought the kid back. The mom was thanking him, and he said, "Don't thank me, thank god. I was just doing his work." UGH. It's the humility and meekness that I can't stand. I respect humbleness for its own sake because I do believe at times we as humans need to be humble, but doing it out of reverence to a delusion is just sickening, especially when it doesn't allow for people to take credit for things and to have self-esteem. Everything has to be about god. We're just dirty, filthy rags and god gets all the credit. It's even more sickening after reading all of the horrific things biblegod has done.

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Yes, yes it can be like this all the time.

 

I was out in my yard filling my new flowerbeds with dirt, and this really nice lady came walking by with her dog and her daughter in a wheelchair. After a bit of smalltalk, she asked me WHERE I go to church. Not, IF I go to church. She proceeds to invite me to her's, and I politely give her the usual, "Why thank you for the invite." Then the uncomfortable silence. :lmao:

 

It is EVERYWHERE down here

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Luckily, no one's asked me if or where I go to church yet. I'm not sure how I'd react. I'd probably pull out my copy of The God Delusion and say, "Do I look like a xian to you?" I read it once on the bus after I caught a glimpse of one woman's purse that had the words "god" and "jesus" all over it. I hid the front of the book, though, because I didn't want to be persecuted. Meh. I hate being in the minority sometimes.

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Luckily, no one's asked me if or where I go to church yet. I'm not sure how I'd react. I'd probably pull out my copy of The God Delusion and say, "Do I look like a xian to you?" I read it once on the bus after I caught a glimpse of one woman's purse that had the words "god" and "jesus" all over it. I hid the front of the book, though, because I didn't want to be persecuted. Meh. I hate being in the minority sometimes.

 

I live in a small town in Ks, and allthough it is not deep in the south, it sounds about like it. I made no secret about the fact of converting or (deconverting). I knew it would get around town anyway. Some of my bar buddies are church goers and accept my decision for what it is without any problems or change in their attitude toward me. They get bitched at for being in the bar on satuday night, so they can relate, if anything.

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Good fuckin' Gawd, where you guys live sounds like the 180 inverse anti-matter opposite of where I live.

 

And that would be none other than...

 

Las Vegas, Nevada! :woohoo::smile::68:B)

 

It's probably the most godless spot in the entire Western world outside of Northern Europe or the former East Bloc.

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Yes, yes it can be like this all the time.

 

I was out in my yard filling my new flowerbeds with dirt, and this really nice lady came walking by with her dog and her daughter in a wheelchair. After a bit of smalltalk, she asked me WHERE I go to church. Not, IF I go to church. She proceeds to invite me to her's, and I politely give her the usual, "Why thank you for the invite." Then the uncomfortable silence. :lmao:

 

It is EVERYWHERE down here

 

I get asked that, too, once in a while. It happens mostly at bus stops. I figure it's partly my fault because I wear the traditional Mennonite dress. Then again, who knows, maybe that's why I don't get asked more often. Maybe people just assume that I go to church because of my dress. Religious dress is very visible in this town what with Muslim and Hindu women wearing their thing and Sheik and Jewish men wearing theirs.

 

Skeptic said:

 

The mom was thanking him, and he said, "Don't thank me, thank god. I was just doing his work." UGH. It's the humility and meekness that I can't stand. I respect humbleness for its own sake because I do believe at times we as humans need to be humble, but doing it out of reverence to a delusion is just sickening, especially when it doesn't allow for people to take credit for things and to have self-esteem. Everything has to be about god. We're just dirty, filthy rags and god gets all the credit. It's even more sickening after reading all of the horrific things biblegod has done.

 

If you don't fear for your job or whatever, then you might be better served if you just came out and told them that you are not religious. This person probably thought you would understand and share his feeling. He might not have shared this particular story if he had known you don't share his beliefs.

 

I wasn't there but maybe next time you could say something like, "I'm glad you found the kid but I'm not religious so I don't really think god had all that much to do with it." Just say it in a "shrug your shoulder sort of way" as though it didn't really matter either way to you how he felt about it but that's your position on it. Or you could leave off the last part about god if it seems too controversial. You might not want to start a fight; just put it out there that you're not the kind of person they want to share their more faithful moments with.

 

Since they sound like a rather harmless bunch, they might also be curious so that by outing yourself you might also open yourself to questions about what you do believe. If you handle this right, things might work out well. BUT, I'm from Canada so you better take my advice with more than one pinch of salt. I'm also thinking, just because things are friendly on the floor where you're working, what are they like up higher--is there someone in control higher up who thinks the company will sink if there's a heretic working for him? Then again, I don't know what position you're working, etc.

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This isn't at work. I'm a stay at home mom, to be honest. These are just random people that I see on the bus. I didn't even know this person. People just talk to me and tell me these things or I overhear (very loud) conversations about it.

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I used to live in southeastern Tennessee. Get used to it. Southerners are the most bible-soaked of all the regions of the USA. It's probably better now with the younger set (than when I lived there), but the South will always lag behind the rest of the country when it comes to liberalizing their religion(or being tolerant). I would be careful with whom you share what is really on your mind. My advice is to find those who are fed up with religion. They are there, believe me!

 

Or you could do what I did. Every weekend I would escape to the Smokies, away from the zealots, and find my peace. Good luck!

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As a native of East Tennessee, I can say that yes- it IS like this all the time. I don't know what part of TN you're in, but in the area where I grew up (Anderson County), those people are insane... don't know why, but fundamentalist christianity really has a hold on peoples' conciousness there. Most of them can't imagine any other way of thinking, and really believe that the answers to all of life's questions lie in their bass-ackwards, semi-literate 'interpretation' of Tha Bible.

 

These days I live in Kansas- land of Fred Phelps... and the people here are VERY reasonable compared to Tennesseans.

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No, I'm not saying that your average Tennessean is worse than Fred Phelps... even I wouldn't go that far. Just sayin' that your average East Tennessean is MUCH more religious (and crazier in general) than your average Kansan.

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I have not met anyone down here that is worse than Fred Phelps.

 

I grew up in the south (southern middle Tennessee), so I have grown immune to it. It might be more of a system shock if I moved up north and was able to drive down a busy road an not see a church on every block.

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... The mom was thanking him, and he said, "Don't thank me, thank god. I was just doing his work." UGH. It's the humility and meekness that I can't stand. ...

 

It's the FALSE humility that I can't stand.

 

Maybe because I was not raised in fundy christianity and never had any personal interaction with fundies from the south, such statements as "I am doing God's work" strike me as the very opposite of humility, as if the person who says this is taking an undue amount of pride in appearing not being proud. It seems to me that it takes a special kind of arrogance (as well as a heaping mound of self-delusion) to claim that one is carrying out the work of a deity or that one is so special as to be deserving of eternal bliss while the ordinary run of humanity deserves eternal torment.

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I live in TN and no, the endless shoving of religion down your throat never stops. It seems like there's always a fundie church on every street and if there isn't, there's some sort of sign or billboard saying something about Jesus or God. And people always make the assumption that you must be a conversative Christian of some sort. They never ask if you go to church. They always ask where you go to church and I don't get why it's any of their business anyway. And I agree with Thackerie that what I can't stand is false humility. The person mentioned in the opening doesn't sound humble to me. They sound rather arrogant. Why would an all-powerful deity care about a human doing what morally decent humans should already be doing on their own anyway? It sounds like they're patting themselves on the back for believing God actually somehow took control of them and did his work through them with magical powers. I'm reminded of that one Pharisee in the bible who was praying to God and thanking him for making him so perfect.

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I live in NC, just a few miles from the Virginia border.

 

There are churches EVERYWHERE.

 

In the classified magazine that circulates in my area, the "miscellaneous" section is filled with churches, prayer groups, Bible study groups... oy vey.

 

It's common to see road signs advertising new church groups meeting at local schools, whether it's Abraham Lincoln Middle School* or John F. Kennedy High School*... "Sunday's at 10 am!" they can't even use an apostrophe correctly, wtf... I'd like to see them read the Bible.

 

There's a "See You at the Pole" group, and they have a HUUUUUUGGGGEEEE poster right in the lobby. Every morning walking into the school building I see like 20 kids praying around the flagpole. Kids hand out "invitations" to youth groups pretty freely here, even at school. Not to mention, the school superintendent is a fundy.

 

Oddly enough, religion tends not to be a big deal here. Most people are pretty lax about it until something happens at a school here. When you get into Virginia however... you'd think that the rural North Carolina county nobody's ever heard of would be more fundyish...

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There's a "See You at the Pole" group, and they have a HUUUUUUGGGGEEEE poster right in the lobby. Every morning walking into the school building I see like 20 kids praying around the flagpole.

 

I was born and raised in the Los Angeles area. I remember the youth groups in my neck of the woods would try to do the "See You at the Pole" thing once a year when it came around. I remember going two or three times. It was usually maybe 25 kids, and that was out of a high school of 2,000. And the other kids would either walk right past or they'd stand and gawk, going "WTF are they doing!?" :huh: And there would usually be a couple of hecklers, and the Christian kids would do their best to ignore the hecklers while also relishing the sense of persecution.

 

Those of us that were fundies always felt like we were a beleaguered minority. I could have never imagined a place where we were practically the majority.

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As a native of East Tennessee, I can say that yes- it IS like this all the time. I don't know what part of TN you're in, but in the area where I grew up (Anderson County), those people are insane... don't know why, but fundamentalist christianity really has a hold on peoples' conciousness there. Most of them can't imagine any other way of thinking, and really believe that the answers to all of life's questions lie in their bass-ackwards, semi-literate 'interpretation' of Tha Bible.

 

These days I live in Kansas- land of Fred Phelps... and the people here are VERY reasonable compared to Tennesseans.

 

I was a transplanted Yankee in Chattanooga. Too many churches and the only pizza was Pizza Hut! Coming from the Chicago area, that's a mortal sin!

 

The only people I knew who weren't shirtsleeve christians were a couple gay guys. They would tell me what they thought (about the churches), and we had some good laughs. But they would not really "come out". I knew they were gay and they kew I knew without ever mentioning it. That tells you something about how they were treated by the "good" christians.

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The guy yesterday that was spouting his mouth off was talking about some kid or something who ran away from his mother (I couldn't understand him very well) and he brought the kid back. The mom was thanking him, and he said, "Don't thank me, thank god. I was just doing his work."

So the mom said "Hey, yeah. You didn't do shit. In fact, maybe God wanted my kid gone. Ever think of that you heretic asshole?" And hit the man with stones until he was dead. She finished him off with a "Now that's God's work motherfucker."

 

mwc

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Sounds like my town more churches than grass and most peoples kissing Jesus on the ass.

I for some reason like to question things when people say stuff like God brought their child back. I'd say why'd your God let them leave?

Then I write their stupid answer and my real opinon of it in a blog or group lol

Be openly skeptical and ask questions it's fun when you get used to the criticism.

Who knows you may run into someone who says your right it don't make any sense christianity is stupid!

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There's a "See You at the Pole" group, and they have a HUUUUUUGGGGEEEE poster right in the lobby. Every morning walking into the school building I see like 20 kids praying around the flagpole.

 

I was born and raised in the Los Angeles area. I remember the youth groups in my neck of the woods would try to do the "See You at the Pole" thing once a year when it came around. I remember going two or three times. It was usually maybe 25 kids, and that was out of a high school of 2,000. And the other kids would either walk right past or they'd stand and gawk, going "WTF are they doing!?" :huh: And there would usually be a couple of hecklers, and the Christian kids would do their best to ignore the hecklers while also relishing the sense of persecution.

 

Those of us that were fundies always felt like we were a beleaguered minority. I could have never imagined a place where we were practically the majority.

 

I remember people being ostracized if they didn't join the group.

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I live in Arkansas. It's like that all the time. There are several schools where they still pray before football games. Even on top 40 radio stations, you can hardly find one on Sunday morning that DOESN'T have a church service on the airwaves. It's maddening and it's suffocating when you think about it. I suggest finding gay/gay friendly people to hang out with. It worked for me! The gay community and the church crowd typically don't mix much around here.

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No, I'm not saying that your average Tennessean is worse than Fred Phelps... even I wouldn't go that far. Just sayin' that your average East Tennessean is MUCH more religious (and crazier in general) than your average Kansan.

 

 

Ok, I got it now. I mis-read you previous post. I didn't think that there were too many people worse than that screwball. His whole bunch is the true meaning of "extreme."

 

I have seen his group was at the funeral of a fallen soldier, and at Greensburg, Ks, when Bush came there last year for the one year aniversary of the the tornado and the High School Graduation. Vile is the only way I can put it. Usually, there are so many patriot guard reving their bikes or blocking view of them, they really don't matter, but you still know they are there.

 

Phelp's group actually got upstaged at Greensburg by a local fellow that is an artist and like a folk hero around there. This old guy was pulling a trailer behind a pickup with some homeade effigys and a banner insulting the Phelps bunch. It seemed to get a rise out of the phelps bunch. He was driving it down the main Highway that was being shutdown and blocked for Bush's arrival. Needless to say, he did get some heat from the men with suits and sunglasses.

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