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"biblical Archaeology"


Guest RickJ
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Guest RickJ

If the archaeology of the Near/Middle East is an interest of yours, check out the Biblical Archaeology Society (BAS): http://www.bib-arch.org/. We, too, have a forum (http://www.forum.bib-arch.org) where you are welcome.

 

BAS has been publishing the latest research in the field of archaeology in the Biblical lands since 1975 in their flagship magazine, Biblical Archaeology Review (http://www.bib-arch.org/bar/contents.asp), excerpts of which are available online at http://www.biblicalarchaeology.org. The comprehensive website posts the latest news from the world of Biblical archaeology, as well as an extensive list of excavations in the Mediterranean world (http://digs.bib-arch.org/) that are looking for dig volunteers. The archive of the thousands of articles published since 1975 by the foremost scholars in the field is a great resource for researchers and the interested public alike: http://members.bib-arch.org.

 

The site also offers Online Exclusives (http://www.bib-arch.org/online-exclusives/), a Debates section (http://www.bib-arch.org/debates/debates.asp) that features the latest controversies in the field, and E-Features: online articles written especially for web visitors: http://www.bib-arch.org/e-features/e-features.asp

 

With an active Forum (http://www.forum.bib-arch.org), readers and visitors can join discussions of the latest news and discoveries in the field of Biblical archaeology. The Travel/Study program (http://www.bib-arch.org/travel-study/) offers unique educational opportunities through their U.S. and international seminars, as well as through their scholarly adventure tours to legendary places like Israel, Jordan, Turkey, Greece, Egypt and Cyprus.

 

We would like to post occasional updated here on your forum - and invite you to do the same on our own forum (http://www.forum.bib-arch.org); presuming that these link exchanges will benefit us both.

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I'm not sure it benefits us in any particular way, since we think most of it is junk. Sure, you might have some things that can be correct and maybe help the overall historical research, but in general I don't think we really care that much if they found Noah's sandals or the salt statue of Lot's wife.

 

Thanks, but no thanks.

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Few people here believe anything in the bible. From sites we have all looked at, there has been a christian bias even to the point of deliberate lies on "evidence" to support the bible (as in Ron Wyatt). I noted a bit of that in the C14 article on the site you gave a link to.

 

If you think something important has turned up in archeology that we should know about, you can post about it here, but I can't guarantee a good reception for it if they do not have a very good case for what they say. You can certainly debate on any subject here but remember this is a place where people do speak their minds and if someone says something against christianity or calls another person an idiot or worse, it is no big deal here. No one is going to run crying to their mother.

 

Have you read "The Bible Unearthed" and if so, what did you think about it?

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Guest Itookthebluepill
Few people here believe anything in the bible. From sites we have all looked at, there has been a christian bias even to the point of deliberate lies on "evidence" to support the bible (as in Ron Wyatt). I noted a bit of that in the C14 article on the site you gave a link to.

 

If you think something important has turned up in archeology that we should know about, you can post about it here, but I can't guarantee a good reception for it if they do not have a very good case for what they say. You can certainly debate on any subject here but remember this is a place where people do speak their minds and if someone says something against christianity or calls another person an idiot or worse, it is no big deal here. No one is going to run crying to their mother.

 

Have you read "The Bible Unearthed" and if so, what did you think about it?

 

 

Being realistic, we can't even know for sure that so many of the quote "Archeological" artifacts from the bible ever even existed. Anyone in the King James Bible that wrote about the last supper, crucifixion, resurrection and shroud, or anything else physical pertaining to Christ was almost certainly never alive to have actually witnessed any of it. The truth is that the cross, if you buy into the resurrection, was probably used to crucify hundreds or even thousands of others after Christ. These expeditions to find hard evidence to confirm anything written in the bible are pointless-nothing more than people seeking evidence to justify their beliefs.

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...BAS has been publishing the latest research in the field of archaeology in the Biblical lands since 1975...

 

I suppose y'all have found another 100 pounds of the "ole rugged cross"? Have y'all found any evidence of a million people wandering around Sinai for forty years yet? There ought to be one hellasious pile of shit around there somewhere, not to mention a million graves. Just think if you could get a hold of that shit you could figure out what manna was.

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I haven't read any of their periodicals in a long time, but from what I remember, just because the word "biblical" is in their name does not necessarily mean that they are all Bible believers over at BAR. I think the term "biblical" refers more to the fact that they work in areas that where covered within the Bible and within those time frames. This could be anything from ancient Egypt to Persia to Rome. They have had articles in the past by Jewish scholars as well as Christian.

 

This is from their web site:

 

The Biblical Archaeology Society (BAS) was founded in 1974 as a nonprofit, nondenominational, educational organization dedicated to the dissemination of information about archaeology in the Bible lands.

 

They have had some interesting articles in the past and many of them have been controversial (as far as Bible believing Christians are concerned).

 

Again, it has been a long time since I have read anything by them, but this may be a case of throwing out the baby with the bathwater (if you happen to be interested in archaeology).

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I've seen your magazine in the bookstores and I even subscribed to it a very long time ago.

 

Why not just call your selves 'archaeologists?" How does adding the name 'biblical' to your archaeology make you any more credible than a regular archaeologist? God gives you special instructions where to dig? Biblical archaeology may prove certain kings mentioned in the babble actually lived. I can believe they lived and their cities existed. So what? How does proving an ancient king existed, prove the miracles or that Moses or Jesus actually existed? Got something beyond the babble with their names on it? How about the talking snake? Can Bible Archaeology prove the talking snake story? Prove the resurrection? Didn't think so. Move along and don't forget your spam ...

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If the archaeology of the Near/Middle East is an interest of yours, ... SNIP

Actually, it was "biblical Archaeology" 1 that led to my deconversion.

I suggest you take a good look at the findings of Kathleen Kenyon. Another good read is the notes of Joseph Callaway of Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. The poor guy was pretty broken up when he found out that Ai had lain in ruins for more than a thousand years before Joshua got there.

 

But hey, thanks for posting and let me know when you find the fabled city of Arimathea.

 

 

 

 

1 biblical Archaeology - The practice of setting out with the bible in one hand and a shovel in the other, intent on "proving" the historocity of the bible.

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