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Incensole Acetate, An Incense Component, Elicits Psychoactivity


Mriana
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I'm having a hard time buying this, but I guess since the whole service is all about triggering neuro-chemistry in order to give people a feeling of "god", I guess it is possible.

 

Published online before print May 20, 2008 as doi: 10.1096/fj.07-101865.

 

Incensole acetate, an incense component, elicits psychoactivity by activating TRPV3 channels in the brain

 

Arieh Moussaieff, Neta Rimmerman, Tatiana Bregman, Alex Straiker, Christian C. Felder, Shai Shoham, Yoel Kashman, Susan M. Huang, Hyosang Lee, Esther Shohami, Ken Mackie, Michael J. Caterina, J. Michael Walker, Ester Fride, and Raphael Mechoulam

 

Burning of Boswellia resin as incense has been part of religious and cultural ceremonies for millennia and is believed to contribute to the spiritual exaltation associated with such events. Transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 3 is an ion channel implicated in the perception of warmth in the skin. TRPV3 mRNA has also been found in neurons throughout the brain; however, the role of TRPV3 channels there remains unknown. Here we show that incensole acetate (IA), a Boswellia resin constituent, is a potent TRPV3 agonist that causes anxiolytic-like and antidepressive-like behavioral effects in wild-type (WT) mice with concomitant changes in c-Fos activation in the brain. These behavioral effects were not noted in TRPV3/ mice, suggesting that they are mediated via TRPV3 channels. IA activated TRPV3 channels stably expressed in HEK293 cells and in keratinocytes from TRPV3/ mice. It had no effect on keratinocytes from TRPV3/ mice and showed modest or no effect on TRPV1, TRPV2, and TRPV4, as well as on 24 other receptors, ion channels, and transport proteins. Our results imply that TRPV3 channels in the brain may play a role in emotional regulation. Furthermore, the biochemical and pharmacological effects of IA may provide a biological basis for deeply rooted cultural and religious traditions.

 

full paper in PDF: http://www.fasebj.org/cgi/reprint/22/8/3024.pdf

 

Anyone have any thoughts on this or even more information?

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If getting "god" is the same as getting high does that make "god" illegal of does that legalize getting high?

 

mwc

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Well here's the catch... It is legal within a church setting. Even minors can legally have a sip of wine during communion. Jewish children, can have wine during a Sader. Peyote is permissible in the Peyote Church. There are other "drugs" that are legal in a religious service that are not legal outside the religious service too. This is what happens when one has Separation of Church and State. Some laws don't apply to religious institutions- such as drug and alcohol use.

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Yeah, well, then why hasn't my "Weekly Passion of the Homeless Guy" church taken off? Murder. Pffft. He's saving our freaking souls. Then there's the after-BBQ of course (it's a public service for the homeless...and there's a type of "lotto" for those who come).

 

I'm not understanding why I'm seeing so much red tape while you mention other religions getting a free pass.

 

mwc

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Yeah, well, then why hasn't my "Weekly Passion of the Homeless Guy" church taken off? Murder. Pffft. He's saving our freaking souls. Then there's the after-BBQ of course (it's a public service for the homeless...and there's a type of "lotto" for those who come).

 

I'm not understanding why I'm seeing so much red tape while you mention other religions getting a free pass.

 

mwc

 

Maybe because you're not recognized as a religion? I don't know. I just know various religious groups get away with giving minors wine or taking peyote, etc. without getting into legal trouble.

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Yeah, well, then why hasn't my "Weekly Passion of the Homeless Guy" church taken off? Murder. Pffft. He's saving our freaking souls. Then there's the after-BBQ of course (it's a public service for the homeless...and there's a type of "lotto" for those who come).

 

I'm not understanding why I'm seeing so much red tape while you mention other religions getting a free pass.

 

mwc

 

Maybe because you're not recognized as a religion? I don't know. I just know various religious groups get away with giving minors wine or taking peyote, etc. without getting into legal trouble.

 

I just packed my bong up with incense and all I got was a headache..:D

 

Joking aside, religions are also exempt from anti-discrimination laws, and, I would guess as an extension of that, hate speech laws. I applied for a job at a church once editing their radio show and I had to wade through and sign a bunch of documents stating I understand that they do not have to abide by any of those laws and I could get fired for anything at any time. I never went through with the rest of the application process.

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Yes, Marty, currently the A of G can fire someone for being an atheist and refusing to attend one of their churches. They don't even have to hire you if they know you are atheist when you apply. Suffice it to say, I would not apply with them if my life depended on it, but the thing is churches can do almost anything they want, short of murder.

 

Of course, define murder... They are also exempt from modern medicine too, so I'm assuming that isn't considered murder. Then again, that looks like it could be changing.

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Soooooo...short of murder you say? :scratch:

 

I'm not sure how this will effect the BBQ.

 

mwc

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Yes, Marty, currently the A of G can fire someone for being an atheist and refusing to attend one of their churches. They don't even have to hire you if they know you are atheist when you apply. Suffice it to say, I would not apply with them if my life depended on it, but the thing is churches can do almost anything they want, short of murder.

 

Of course, define murder... They are also exempt from modern medicine too, so I'm assuming that isn't considered murder. Then again, that looks like it could be changing.

 

Why any atheist would want to work in a church is beyond me; they will fire you right on the spot.

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I know and refused to go apply at the A of G when Job council suggested it to me. It was the only one I firmly said "no" too. She asked why and told her, "Well... I have a tendency to go on rants. I don't think they would appreciate them." She frown, but agreed and moved on.

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Yes, Marty, currently the A of G can fire someone for being an atheist and refusing to attend one of their churches. They don't even have to hire you if they know you are atheist when you apply. Suffice it to say, I would not apply with them if my life depended on it, but the thing is churches can do almost anything they want, short of murder.

 

Of course, define murder... They are also exempt from modern medicine too, so I'm assuming that isn't considered murder. Then again, that looks like it could be changing.

 

Why any atheist would want to work in a church is beyond me; they will fire you right on the spot.

 

I wasn't an Atheist yet when I applied there. This was in 98 or 99, I was free of church and xtianity, but religion didn't affect me until 9/11 really. At the time I applied (it was Coral Ridge Ministeries at that! Kennedy!) I was a coffee boy/intern/assistant in a local studio that had a engineer there that worked for Calvary Chapel. He liked me and my professionalism and so he asked me if I'd be interested in the job, and set up the interview with me. I jumped at the chance cause I wanted to be a real engineer and not clean toilets and answer phones anymore. But when I got there I realized it wasn't worth it.

 

But they were def. one of the last bricks in my wall. Now I just need to figure out how to tear the damn thing down! :)

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