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Poll: Are You More Or Less Genuine As A Former Xtian?


Mongo
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This has probably been done already but hell... lets see what the results are this month.

 

Trying not to put my own bias into the question, I think it speaks for itself and I think it is a very important question.

 

What do you all say?

 

Mongo

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About the same. Again, this issue irked me a little while involved with the church scene. I saw the same kind of posturing and social politics going on there, if not moreso, than in the regular social venues.

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I answered that I feel much more genuine. I feel I can truly be myself. I felt something was wrong while I was still a Christian, but I either ignored it or I passed it off as an attack from Satan. Now I feel I can be completely open and honest about who I am. No more lies or hiding feelings.

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I am more genuine to myself.

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"As a former christian - Are you more genuine or less genuine?"

 

Assuming that you mean comparing our current nonchristian status with our former christian status, I selected "I'm no different." I have always valued integrity and despised disingenuousness, both as a believer and nonbeliever.

 

If, on the other hand, you mean comparing our ex-christian status with our perceptions of the status of having never been christian, then I would say that I don't know. I'm assuming that this is not what you meant, though.

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In the fundamentalist version of xtianity there is a constant raising of the bar. If you develop a habit of praying 15 minutes each day or reading 2 chapters of the bible each day, giving 15% of your income instead of a mere 10%, or [put religious goal here] you have met your goal and need to move on to a new one.

 

You are never what you should be and if you continue the pattern you will begin to strain to be something you are not.

 

When you leave fundamentalism, you can make peace with your humanness. Odd that one of the xtian doctrines seeks to do just that - make peace with who we are by simple forgiveness. And then in a whisper of scripture that freedom to be human is instantly removed with the unforgettable line, "Faith without works is dead". Slam! There is no real freedom to be human, you can't be yourself.

 

When I moved away from xtianity, I became more human, more me and exceedingly more genuine immediately and as time went by.

 

This is why I started this poll.

 

Mongo

 

 

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In the fundamentalist version of xtianity there is a constant raising of the bar. If you develop a habit of praying 15 minutes each day or reading 2 chapters of the bible each day, giving 15% of your income instead of a mere 10%, or [put religious goal here] you have met your goal and need to move on to a new one.

 

You are never what you should be and if you continue the pattern you will begin to strain to be something you are not.

 

When you leave fundamentalism, you can make peace with your humanness. Odd that one of the xtian doctrines seeks to do just that - make peace with who we are by simple forgiveness. And then in a whisper of scripture that freedom to be human is instantly removed with the unforgettable line, "Faith without works is dead". Slam! There is no real freedom to be human, you can't be yourself.

 

When I moved away from xtianity, I became more human, more me and exceedingly more genuine immediately and as time went by.

 

This is why I started this poll.

 

Mongo

It's odd that I still find the phrase "Faith without works is dead" to be accurate. It is ultimately what we do that affects others and potentially changes the world. I have taught, and this is part of my gift to humanity - not what I did myself, but passing on knowledge which will affect many and grow like a family.

 

Praying (or other exhibitions of faith) is useless.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I am a much better person now than I was as a christian. I am less judgmental of people. I used to look down on people who indulged in the finer things in life, sex, alcohol, etc. First I started to let go of the negative outlook on those things, then I started to indulge myself!

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I'm more genuine now, because then I had to try to feel things which i didn't really feel (although I wanted to feel them). It was kind of depressing to have to try to feel something I didn't feel. I didn't love God enough. I didn't have enough faith. I didn't care about other people enough. I didn't hate 'the world' enough. I wasn't sorry enough about my sins. The list goes on. It was a strain to have to try so much of the time, rather than feel what I feel. Its much better now, being free to accept whatever.

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If it was a matter of being socially genuine, then I'm pretty much the same person I was as a Christian. But one of the biggest levers that forced me out of the religion was all those theological/doctrinal positions which were real catch twenty-two's. They inescapably put me in a position where I had no choice but to lie, one way or another. Coming to the point where I knew that I couldn't remain a Christian without lying was the biggest sign to me that I was in a false religion.

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I am more genuine to myself.

Yes. That's exactly how I feel.

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I feel like I am myself again. It's very nice.

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I am much more genuine - to myself, to others, and in how I treat and react to others. There's no longer this behavioral "should do's/be's/etc" hanging over me, now if I piss someone off, it's because I was being true to myself, and if I'm happy for someone, it's because I'm honestly happy for them!

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