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Heaven Is For Real


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This little boy was on both the Today show and Kathy Lee and Hoda this morning talking about his book, "Heaven is for Real."

 

Here is a link to the official website so you can get an idea of what the book is about.

 

Heaven is for Real BOOK

 

Sounds like a bunch of hokey to me, the only thing I didn't understand was how he knew things he didn't previously have knowledge of (like his mom's miscarraige.)

 

This little boy had a NDE, and saw what he expected to see.

 

On another note, I saw a documentary about Lee Strobel's book and he said that he almost lost his wife due to the fact that he was an atheist and she became a Christian so he started doing all his research based on that one emotional element. Talk about finding what you want to find.

 

Sometimes I want God to be real, but he just hasn't shown up lately.

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I thought heaven was real when I had that orgasm last night......

 

And I have always just known things without knowing why I know them. Nothing to do with heaven.

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What bugs me is they're using the impressionable mind of a child to make money. The kid was four years old for crying out loud! His capacity for distinguishing fantasy from reality hadn't even developed yet, much less being able to understand a near death experience.

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I'm reading this book currently. Only into the first chapter do you realize that 1) the dad wrote the book (not the son) 2)the dad is a preacher and 3)the family was deep in debt after their son's surgery.

 

Also of interest, the boy was only 3 years old when this happened, not 4. He started talking about it a few months later after he turned 4. They kept grilling him about it for years. I'm only about a third into the book. I'll keep you updated.

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Of course this all gets credence with the from the mouths of babes...:twitch:

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I can sort of understand how people could interpret their encounters with the "other side", angels, etc. as real events, but why would others believe them? This, to me, is one of life's great mysteries.

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Okay. I finished the book this morning. The first 50% of the book is the pastor dad telling all about the family, their beliefs, the boy's illness, etc. Then the child says upon seeing the hospital again from the car window (4 months or so after his surgery - not an NDE at all) that the angels sang to him when he was in the hospital.

 

The next 20% of the book is all about them discussing the child's experience. At first it seems plausible. What's so odd about the 3 year old son of a pastor who listens to bible stories every day saying that while he was in surgery he went to heaven and sat on Jesus' lap? He seemed to have had a bit of an out-of-body experience because he said he could see what was happening in the hospital. He definitely was never dead at any time. Even the parents admit this.

 

Then the book gets ridiculous. The parents, especially the dad, continue to ask Colton about his "visit to heaven." They question him not over days or weeks but over YEARS. They expect him to tell them something new each time, so he does.

 

Here's an example of the questioning:

Two YEARS after the boy's surgery, the family was watching a DVD of "The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe." After the last big sword-fighting battle scene where the princes and princesses along with the other "good guys" beat the monsters and "bad guys," the mom remarks to the boy, "Well, I guess that's one thing you didn't like about heaven - no swords up there."

 

Colton came back with, "There are too swords in heaven!" Then he proceeded to tell them all about a big battle between the "good guys" and the "bad guys" including the devil, in heaven.

 

Pastor dad says scripture from Luke leapt to his mind where Jesus tells the disciples, "I saw Satan fall like lightning from heaven." and scripture from Daniel where an angel pays a delayed visit to him because he was engaged in a battle with the "king of Persia."

 

So, the movie and the kid's attraction to action figures and swords, and the kid's knowledge of bible stories never figures into the equation?

 

Over and over again, this is the kind of "proof" in the book that Colton visited heaven. It's simply nonsense.

 

Much of it seems to be pure fabrication by the pastor dad. In my opinion, I think that's why they've waited so long to write this awful book: They needed to convince the poor kid that he went to heaven and it took lots of years of subliminal suggestions to do it.

 

The book made me angry with the parents and very sad for the boy who's been used and brainwashed for what? Notoriety, money, and a religious agenda! Sickening!

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Okay. I finished the book this morning. The first 50% of the book is the pastor dad telling all about the family, their beliefs, the boy's illness, etc. Then the child says upon seeing the hospital again from the car window (4 months or so after his surgery - not an NDE at all) that the angels sang to him when he was in the hospital.

 

The next 20% of the book is all about them discussing the child's experience. At first it seems plausible. What's so odd about the 3 year old son of a pastor who listens to bible stories every day saying that while he was in surgery he went to heaven and sat on Jesus' lap? He seemed to have had a bit of an out-of-body experience because he said he could see what was happening in the hospital. He definitely was never dead at any time. Even the parents admit this.

 

Then the book gets ridiculous. The parents, especially the dad, continue to ask Colton about his "visit to heaven." They question him not over days or weeks but over YEARS. They expect him to tell them something new each time, so he does.

 

Here's an example of the questioning:

Two YEARS after the boy's surgery, the family was watching a DVD of "The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe." After the last big sword-fighting battle scene where the princes and princesses along with the other "good guys" beat the monsters and "bad guys," the mom remarks to the boy, "Well, I guess that's one thing you didn't like about heaven - no swords up there."

 

Colton came back with, "There are too swords in heaven!" Then he proceeded to tell them all about a big battle between the "good guys" and the "bad guys" including the devil, in heaven.

 

Pastor dad says scripture from Luke leapt to his mind where Jesus tells the disciples, "I saw Satan fall like lightning from heaven." and scripture from Daniel where an angel pays a delayed visit to him because he was engaged in a battle with the "king of Persia."

 

So, the movie and the kid's attraction to action figures and swords, and the kid's knowledge of bible stories never figures into the equation?

 

Over and over again, this is the kind of "proof" in the book that Colton visited heaven. It's simply nonsense.

 

Much of it seems to be pure fabrication by the pastor dad. In my opinion, I think that's why they've waited so long to write this awful book: They needed to convince the poor kid that he went to heaven and it took lots of years of subliminal suggestions to do it.

 

The book made me angry with the parents and very sad for the boy who's been used and brainwashed for what? Notoriety, money, and a religious agenda! Sickening!

 

That's exactly what it seems like to me. Just a way to make a buck. Sickos!

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Pretty disgusting way to make a quick buck.

This reeks of Marjoe-like exploitation.

Speaking of Marjoe Gortner, he hasn't popped by here for quite some time. He was an evangelist at age four and debunked the religious institutions in a documentary several years ago. He showed it for the money grabbing opportunists it really is. I think Gortner comes across as a pretty cool guy. Anyone hear from him lately?

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Is it so hard to accept this kid was rejected by his god and thrown out of his own heaven in the same manner as the most evil entity in their entire religion? And that he's now filling our heads with stories like this other entity supposedly did? Is this so hard to believe?

 

I think we need to have compassion on god's little reject.

 

mwc

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What bugs me is they're using the impressionable mind of a child to make money. The kid was four years old for crying out loud! His capacity for distinguishing fantasy from reality hadn't even developed yet, much less being able to understand a near death experience.

My sentiments exact! I suppose if the money is going to help the family recover from medical expenses, then maybe it's not all that bad. Hell, if I was in a bind and needed to take care of my children, I'd write a book about how God saved my life. Honestly, I don't know how far I'd go to take care of my family, whether I'd involve my child just to make the few extra bux.

 

But the question has come up many times before, and likely ever here. Why heaven? Why a need for something better than this? And even if there is a better place, who's to say something greater won't be desired after being there for a number of eons? At what point will we just be content? I like the Ayn Rand quote about heaven. "Ask yourself whether the dream of heaven and greatness should be waiting for us in our graves, or whether it should be ours here and now, and on this earth."

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I'll bet the kid claimed he saw angels.

 

The problem?

 

Angels as we know them aren't even in the bible!

 

5 Things You Won't Believe Aren't In the Bible

Read more: http://www.cracked.com/article_18757_5-things-you-wont-believe-arent-in-bible.html#ixzz1HM2gjhGZ

 

As a predominantly Christian people, Westerners think they know the Bible pretty well. But not everybody realizes that many of the most iconic features of Christianity were never mentioned by the holy book or the church, but were actually pulled from the ass of some poet or artist years after God turned in his final draft of the Bible.

 

Things like ...

 

#5.Angels

 

The image of an angel is so recognizable that you can immediately spot one if somebody makes its shape in some snow. They're sparkly people with two white wings and occasionally swords, who sit on clouds ripping out awesome harp solos while protecting humans from harm. So basically, the protagonists of the next Stephenie Meyer novel.

 

The Only Problem Is ...

 

Now, there are angels in the Bible. But if you encountered some of the angels it describes, you'd probably need a shotgun under your bed to sleep soundly for the rest of your life.*

 

*NOTE: that is a joke. If angels turn out to be real, and you encounter one, do not shoot it with a shotgun.

 

There are several kinds of angels in the Bible and you've probably heard about some of them, like archangels, cherubim and seraphim. They all look different, and very few actually have wings. Those who do, like the seraphim, actually have six wings and need all of them to cover their body, lest they blind/incinerate whoever is unlucky enough to bump into one.

 

33630.jpg?v=1

This is a seraph, trying with all its might not to burn you alive.

 

 

Then there are the thrones, which are described in the Bible as "wheels within wheels," the rims of which are covered in eyes.

33631.jpg?v=1

 

 

Then we have the cutest order of angels, the cherubim. As we all know, a cherub is a baby angel, usually with a little bow and arrow and a leaf protecting his modesty. Except that Ezekiel 10:14 describes them as frightening four-headed monstrosities that included the faces of a man, an eagle and a lion.

 

33632.jpg?v=1

 

 

Actually Came From:

 

Painters took liberties when portraying angels, and just like putting capes on superheroes, giving them wings was a visually interesting way to identify who was the angel in a painting full of regular dudes (wings were also used in the early church to denote that these creatures lived in the sky). Archangels like Michael and Gabriel were given contemporary military garb.

 

Cherubs in particular didn't get their extreme makeover until Renaissance sculptors revived the ancient practice of putti, which depicted cute babies dancing and playing around on infant tombs. The rediscovery and reimplementation of these little cuties brought Cupid-esque cherubs into vogue.

 

 

Lastly, the thing about the harps was actually invented by John Milton who wrote about angels "plucking harps" in Paradise Lost, basically just because it was the cutest thing he could pull out of his ass.

 

Read more: http://www.cracked.com/article_18757_5-things-you-wont-believe-arent-in-bible.html#ixzz1HM2LaIH1

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Then the book gets ridiculous. The parents, especially the dad, continue to ask Colton about his "visit to heaven." They question him not over days or weeks but over YEARS. They expect him to tell them something new each time, so he does.

 

Here's an example of the questioning:

Two YEARS after the boy's surgery, the family was watching a DVD of "The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe." After the last big sword-fighting battle scene where the princes and princesses along with the other "good guys" beat the monsters and "bad guys," the mom remarks to the boy, "Well, I guess that's one thing you didn't like about heaven - no swords up there."

 

Colton came back with, "There are too swords in heaven!" Then he proceeded to tell them all about a big battle between the "good guys" and the "bad guys" including the devil, in heaven.

 

 

From what you wrote even Xtians should be sceptical about this whole thing.

 

Reminds me of "recovered memories". This episode of 60 minutes focuses on "recovered memories" of molestation, but I think the phenomenon is similar.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Okay. I finished the book this morning. The first 50% of the book is the pastor dad telling all about the family, their beliefs, the boy's illness, etc. Then the child says upon seeing the hospital again from the car window (4 months or so after his surgery - not an NDE at all) that the angels sang to him when he was in the hospital.

 

The next 20% of the book is all about them discussing the child's experience. At first it seems plausible. What's so odd about the 3 year old son of a pastor who listens to bible stories every day saying that while he was in surgery he went to heaven and sat on Jesus' lap? He seemed to have had a bit of an out-of-body experience because he said he could see what was happening in the hospital. He definitely was never dead at any time. Even the parents admit this.

 

Then the book gets ridiculous. The parents, especially the dad, continue to ask Colton about his "visit to heaven." They question him not over days or weeks but over YEARS. They expect him to tell them something new each time, so he does.

 

Here's an example of the questioning:

Two YEARS after the boy's surgery, the family was watching a DVD of "The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe." After the last big sword-fighting battle scene where the princes and princesses along with the other "good guys" beat the monsters and "bad guys," the mom remarks to the boy, "Well, I guess that's one thing you didn't like about heaven - no swords up there."

 

Colton came back with, "There are too swords in heaven!" Then he proceeded to tell them all about a big battle between the "good guys" and the "bad guys" including the devil, in heaven.

 

Pastor dad says scripture from Luke leapt to his mind where Jesus tells the disciples, "I saw Satan fall like lightning from heaven." and scripture from Daniel where an angel pays a delayed visit to him because he was engaged in a battle with the "king of Persia."

 

So, the movie and the kid's attraction to action figures and swords, and the kid's knowledge of bible stories never figures into the equation?

 

Over and over again, this is the kind of "proof" in the book that Colton visited heaven. It's simply nonsense.

 

Much of it seems to be pure fabrication by the pastor dad. In my opinion, I think that's why they've waited so long to write this awful book: They needed to convince the poor kid that he went to heaven and it took lots of years of subliminal suggestions to do it.

 

The book made me angry with the parents and very sad for the boy who's been used and brainwashed for what? Notoriety, money, and a religious agenda! Sickening!

 

Hmm, if Jesus "saw Satan fall like lightning from heaven" around 30AD, why the hell is the battle also being fought two thousand years later? (Apparently with the "good guys" winning yet again.) The comments on the facebook page show the kind of people reading this... this dribble.

 

Hello, Todd, Sonja, and Colton. At first I was a little afraid to enter Heaven but your book and Colton's great descriptions of Heaven I've found myself living each and everyday to the fullest! Thanks, Colton for sharing your shocking but true story!

 

Hi everyone! I had a similar experience but I went to hell along with my little cousin which was sleeping next to me at the time. It was like a cave and it had cells like jail. I saw Angels screaming in a very sharp sound like dolphin sound.They were suffering...In the morning when I woke up I realize that my lil cousin was not sleeping next to me. I found her in her Moms bed so I asked why did she left the room and she told me about the same story....she saw the cave, the angels and a big book open.....

 

I too have a son named Kolten, who was 2 just before Christmas. I nearly lost him to a lung infection at just 2 months old. We spent 9 days total at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, OH (3 days ICU, 6 days regular unit). This is the closest to death I have ever witnessed, and one evening (about evening 4), I was putting h...im to sleep for the night. He looked over my shoulder behind me and got the biggest smile (there was nothing there but a paneled empty wall), and from the bottom of my heart felt he saw an angel watching over him. I was very afraid at first, not knowing if he was "going to heaven" after that, or that this angel was watching guard that everything was going to be OK. He is now very healthy, happy, and truly a gift from God. Your story touches me deeply. Thanks for being so transparent and sharing this with others. Your family is making a wonderul difference with this. God bless you & your family.

 

I so believe this story as I had a very close experience as well. Thank you for sharing, and Praise God for leaving Colton on earth so he could share his experience.

 

Has all of xianity turned from a faith built on (completely absent, but still claimed) evidence, into some semi-gnostic idea of "knowing" that god is there and having "visions" of him? I mean, really, is this what it's come to?

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There's a Russian preacher called Ivan Vikovan, who came to our church once and he too claimed to have been in Heaven. (I wasn't at his sermon, I got it on CD). Funny how all these visions of heaven and hell are different, depending on who you listen to. This guy claimed all the people who weren't saved were just standing by, being these grey, miserable creatures hanging their heads low, waiting for the final judgement. Something like this. He said heaven was such a wonderful place he didn't want to come back.

 

The same guy claimed that Satan's throne is an actual real throne kept Moscow. LOL.

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There's a Russian preacher called Ivan Vikovan, who came to our church once and he too claimed to have been in Heaven. (I wasn't at his sermon, I got it on CD). Funny how all these visions of heaven and hell are different, depending on who you listen to. This guy claimed all the people who weren't saved were just standing by, being these grey, miserable creatures hanging their heads low, waiting for the final judgement. Something like this. He said heaven was such a wonderful place he didn't want to come back.

 

The same guy claimed that Satan's throne is an actual real throne kept Moscow. LOL.

 

Suzy, their differing accounts of heaven can be easily explained. Each person just goes into a different neighborhood. There's a lot of diversity in heaven.

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There's a Russian preacher called Ivan Vikovan, who came to our church once and he too claimed to have been in Heaven. (I wasn't at his sermon, I got it on CD). Funny how all these visions of heaven and hell are different, depending on who you listen to. This guy claimed all the people who weren't saved were just standing by, being these grey, miserable creatures hanging their heads low, waiting for the final judgement. Something like this. He said heaven was such a wonderful place he didn't want to come back.

 

The same guy claimed that Satan's throne is an actual real throne kept Moscow. LOL.

 

Suzy, their differing accounts of heaven can be easily explained. Each person just goes into a different neighborhood. There's a lot of diversity in heaven.

 

 

Oh, I had no doubt Xtians can always explain (away) anything. :HaHa:

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  • 3 weeks later...

Pretty disgusting way to make a quick buck.

This reeks of Marjoe-like exploitation.

Speaking of Marjoe Gortner, he hasn't popped by here for quite some time. He was an evangelist at age four and debunked the religious institutions in a documentary several years ago. He showed it for the money grabbing opportunists it really is. I think Gortner comes across as a pretty cool guy. Anyone hear from him lately?

 

 

I heard from him last month. Was actually really a member here? That doesn't sound like him. He's not much for net boards.

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No, no, not a member as far as I know. Either him or someone that knew him popped in and out of here a year ago i think it was. There were some posts that mentioned him and I thought he had cruised by the boards?

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