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Kepler Probe Begins To Find Exoplanets In Habitable Zone (And other cool cosmology stuff)


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I'm surprised this hasn't appeared in this thread yet.

 

FTL travel may be closer than we think, NASA is already working on it, there's a few issues to iron out of course, but they're thinking it may not be as difficult or as far off as previously thought.

 

Traveling at the speed of light or faster would likely just kill us anyway. However, as I understand it FTL is possible by moving space/time around a sort of warp bubble with a ship inside of it. Essentially moving space around us rather than moving through space at high speed. We'd essentially be stationary inside the warp bubble while the galaxy moves by around us. An article about it here:

 

http://techland.time.com/2012/09/19/nasa-actually-working-on-faster-than-light-warp-drive/

 

If this works the way it's presented huge starships wouldn't really be necessary. A small craft similar in size to what we already use, perhaps slightly larger, could make the trip and return quickly, meaning it wouldn't take huge amounts of resources or cargo space to make trips outside our solar system and to other planets. It's entirely possible that we could even make extended voyages using ships the size of medium sized Naval Vessels for extended periods as the time to actually make the trip wouldn't be a huge drain on supplies such as food and oxygen. We'd really only have to consider a short travel time and the bulk of the supplies could be used for the time we'd spend outside of our warp bubble wherever we happen to be going.

 

There's a link to the actual paper on the page, but you'll have to purchase it if you want to read it. Here's the abstract description though:

 

It is shown how, within the framework of general relativity and without the introduction of wormholes, it is possible to modify a spacetime in a way that allows a spaceship to travel with an arbitrarily large speed. By a purely local expansion of spacetime behind the spaceship and an opposite contraction in front of it, motion faster than the speed of light as seen by observers outside the disturbed region is possible. The resulting distortion is reminiscent of the `warp drive' of science fiction. However, just as happens with wormholes, exotic matter will be needed in order to generate a distortion of spacetime like the one discussed here.

 

It's pretty cool, and we may be much closer than you might think to actually visiting these planets and finding out if life exists on them ourselves.

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Lemme see if I remember it right, T2M.  (Reaches back to memory patterns laid down almost fifty years ago.)   According to the United Federation of Planets, a Class M planet is Earthlike.  These new

from xkcd

Until they get tired of me barking: 'T minus 20 billion years until the big crunch' LOL   They'll warp me to the nearest event horizon

I'm surprised this hasn't appeared in this thread yet.

 

FTL travel may be closer than we think, NASA is already working on it, there's a few issues to iron out of course, but they're thinking it may not be as difficult or as far off as previously thought.

 

Traveling at the speed of light or faster would likely just kill us anyway. However, as I understand it FTL is possible by moving space/time around a sort of warp bubble with a ship inside of it. Essentially moving space around us rather than moving through space at high speed. We'd essentially be stationary inside the warp bubble while the galaxy moves by around us. An article about it here:

 

http://techland.time.com/2012/09/19/nasa-actually-working-on-faster-than-light-warp-drive/

 

If this works the way it's presented huge starships wouldn't really be necessary. A small craft similar in size to what we already use, perhaps slightly larger, could make the trip and return quickly, meaning it wouldn't take huge amounts of resources or cargo space to make trips outside our solar system and to other planets. It's entirely possible that we could even make extended voyages using ships the size of medium sized Naval Vessels for extended periods as the time to actually make the trip wouldn't be a huge drain on supplies such as food and oxygen. We'd really only have to consider a short travel time and the bulk of the supplies could be used for the time we'd spend outside of our warp bubble wherever we happen to be going.

 

There's a link to the actual paper on the page, but you'll have to purchase it if you want to read it. Here's the abstract description though:

 

It is shown how, within the framework of general relativity and without the introduction of wormholes, it is possible to modify a spacetime in a way that allows a spaceship to travel with an arbitrarily large speed. By a purely local expansion of spacetime behind the spaceship and an opposite contraction in front of it, motion faster than the speed of light as seen by observers outside the disturbed region is possible. The resulting distortion is reminiscent of the `warp drive' of science fiction. However, just as happens with wormholes, exotic matter will be needed in order to generate a distortion of spacetime like the one discussed here.

 

It's pretty cool, and we may be much closer than you might think to actually visiting these planets and finding out if life exists on them ourselves.

 

 

It is cool stuff but by closer if you mean decades possibly 150 years then I would say yes closer.

 

We have yet to solve many of the problems that deep space travel presents. Getting their fast is only one step. Lots of considerations to take in.

 

Our bodies don't do so well in prolonged weightlessness. We need to solve reliable artificial gravity before really doing any long term exploration. In addition we would need to have some sort of adaptive energy based shielding on the craft. There is lot of radiation in space and probably many kinds we have never even seen or thought about yet.

 

Don't forget issues of renewable breathing air and replenenshing food sources. Personally I think we should master our own solar system before going beyond it in mannned vessels. You know at least colonize mars and one moon out farther such as titan.

 

I don't think any of us will live to see deep space travel as a norm but who knows one fucking insane breakthough can change it all and right fast.

 

We live in a priveledged time. The time when it is in our grasp to finally really start thinking of being out there and surviving. We have the power and tenacity now if we can just get the race together and move on out there.

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I'm surprised this hasn't appeared in this thread yet.

 

FTL travel may be closer than we think, NASA is already working on it, there's a few issues to iron out of course, but they're thinking it may not be as difficult or as far off as previously thought.

 

Traveling at the speed of light or faster would likely just kill us anyway. However, as I understand it FTL is possible by moving space/time around a sort of warp bubble with a ship inside of it. Essentially moving space around us rather than moving through space at high speed. We'd essentially be stationary inside the warp bubble while the galaxy moves by around us. An article about it here:

 

http://techland.time.com/2012/09/19/nasa-actually-working-on-faster-than-light-warp-drive/

 

If this works the way it's presented huge starships wouldn't really be necessary. A small craft similar in size to what we already use, perhaps slightly larger, could make the trip and return quickly, meaning it wouldn't take huge amounts of resources or cargo space to make trips outside our solar system and to other planets. It's entirely possible that we could even make extended voyages using ships the size of medium sized Naval Vessels for extended periods as the time to actually make the trip wouldn't be a huge drain on supplies such as food and oxygen. We'd really only have to consider a short travel time and the bulk of the supplies could be used for the time we'd spend outside of our warp bubble wherever we happen to be going.

 

There's a link to the actual paper on the page, but you'll have to purchase it if you want to read it. Here's the abstract description though:

 

It is shown how, within the framework of general relativity and without the introduction of wormholes, it is possible to modify a spacetime in a way that allows a spaceship to travel with an arbitrarily large speed. By a purely local expansion of spacetime behind the spaceship and an opposite contraction in front of it, motion faster than the speed of light as seen by observers outside the disturbed region is possible. The resulting distortion is reminiscent of the `warp drive' of science fiction. However, just as happens with wormholes, exotic matter will be needed in order to generate a distortion of spacetime like the one discussed here.

 

It's pretty cool, and we may be much closer than you might think to actually visiting these planets and finding out if life exists on them ourselves.

 

 

It is cool stuff but by closer if you mean decades possibly 150 years then I would say yes closer.

 

We have yet to solve many of the problems that deep space travel presents. Getting their fast is only one step. Lots of considerations to take in.

 

Our bodies don't do so well in prolonged weightlessness. We need to solve reliable artificial gravity before really doing any long term exploration. In addition we would need to have some sort of adaptive energy based shielding on the craft. There is lot of radiation in space and probably many kinds we have never even seen or thought about yet.

 

Don't forget issues of renewable breathing air and replenenshing food sources. Personally I think we should master our own solar system before going beyond it in mannned vessels. You know at least colonize mars and one moon out farther such as titan.

 

I don't think any of us will live to see deep space travel as a norm but who knows one fucking insane breakthough can change it all and right fast.

 

We live in a priveledged time. The time when it is in our grasp to finally really start thinking of being out there and surviving. We have the power and tenacity now if we can just get the race together and move on out there.

 

 

Actually, FTL travel would solve several of these issues. I think you're thinking too much Star Trek and not enough practical application.

 

We already know how to provide artificial gravity for extended travel in space. See the film 2001 and right there you have the answer to that. It doesn't necessarily have to be on the same scale, but the principal shown in the film is sound.

 

I doubt it will be a 'norm' for quite some time, but small crews can be sent quite a ways for a few years isn't much of a stretch with a vessel of enough size. A mid sized naval vessel sized ship could supply a small crew for an extended period of time. Oxygen can be stretched quite a ways, it can be created with water, Carbon Dioxide can be scrubbed, and water recycling produces not only oxygen, but can stretch the supply of drinkable water quite a bit. The effects of the lack of a day night cycle can be solved the same way it is in Alaska.

 

FTL would cut down the supply needs of an extended space mission by quite a bit. It is possible that we might be able to reach nearby stars and planets with a small crew in a good sized vessel, and we'd certainly be able to explore the solar system much more easily, which would have a huge impact on the planet. Minerals, Fuel, and other exploitable resources from the other planets, moons, and asteroids in our system would be open to us within a very short time once FTL travel is obtained. Being able to reach the outer edge of our solar system in a week or so rather than months or even years of travel would make a huge difference.

 

Yeah. Running about the Galaxy ala Star Trek is not likely to happen within our lifetime. FTL travel would eliminate the need for 'extended' travel within our solar system. It becomes possible for us to use resources outside of our planet. Permanent or even extended temporary bases could be made for mining. Resupplying such installations becomes possible with FTL cutting down the time and cost of doing so. Useful gasses could be harvested as well as ores.That's a very real possibility if FTL is made functional within our lifetime.

 

Star Trek style exploration is a long way off, but FTL travel has many possibilities in the short term that current technology can exploit as well. I doubt we'll reach the edge of the galaxy, but even short visits to nearby star systems might not be that far off. At the very least it will open up our own solar system to us.

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I'm surprised this hasn't appeared in this thread yet.

 

FTL travel may be closer than we think, NASA is already working on it, there's a few issues to iron out of course, but they're thinking it may not be as difficult or as far off as previously thought.

 

Traveling at the speed of light or faster would likely just kill us anyway. However, as I understand it FTL is possible by moving space/time around a sort of warp bubble with a ship inside of it. Essentially moving space around us rather than moving through space at high speed. We'd essentially be stationary inside the warp bubble while the galaxy moves by around us. An article about it here:

 

http://techland.time.com/2012/09/19/nasa-actually-working-on-faster-than-light-warp-drive/

 

If this works the way it's presented huge starships wouldn't really be necessary. A small craft similar in size to what we already use, perhaps slightly larger, could make the trip and return quickly, meaning it wouldn't take huge amounts of resources or cargo space to make trips outside our solar system and to other planets. It's entirely possible that we could even make extended voyages using ships the size of medium sized Naval Vessels for extended periods as the time to actually make the trip wouldn't be a huge drain on supplies such as food and oxygen. We'd really only have to consider a short travel time and the bulk of the supplies could be used for the time we'd spend outside of our warp bubble wherever we happen to be going.

 

There's a link to the actual paper on the page, but you'll have to purchase it if you want to read it. Here's the abstract description though:

 

It is shown how, within the framework of general relativity and without the introduction of wormholes, it is possible to modify a spacetime in a way that allows a spaceship to travel with an arbitrarily large speed. By a purely local expansion of spacetime behind the spaceship and an opposite contraction in front of it, motion faster than the speed of light as seen by observers outside the disturbed region is possible. The resulting distortion is reminiscent of the `warp drive' of science fiction. However, just as happens with wormholes, exotic matter will be needed in order to generate a distortion of spacetime like the one discussed here.

 

It's pretty cool, and we may be much closer than you might think to actually visiting these planets and finding out if life exists on them ourselves.

 

 

It is cool stuff but by closer if you mean decades possibly 150 years then I would say yes closer.

 

We have yet to solve many of the problems that deep space travel presents. Getting their fast is only one step. Lots of considerations to take in.

 

Our bodies don't do so well in prolonged weightlessness. We need to solve reliable artificial gravity before really doing any long term exploration. In addition we would need to have some sort of adaptive energy based shielding on the craft. There is lot of radiation in space and probably many kinds we have never even seen or thought about yet.

 

Don't forget issues of renewable breathing air and replenenshing food sources. Personally I think we should master our own solar system before going beyond it in mannned vessels. You know at least colonize mars and one moon out farther such as titan.

 

I don't think any of us will live to see deep space travel as a norm but who knows one fucking insane breakthough can change it all and right fast.

 

We live in a priveledged time. The time when it is in our grasp to finally really start thinking of being out there and surviving. We have the power and tenacity now if we can just get the race together and move on out there.

 

 

Actually, FTL travel would solve several of these issues. I think you're thinking too much Star Trek and not enough practical application.

 

We already know how to provide artificial gravity for extended travel in space. See the film 2001 and right there you have the answer to that. It doesn't necessarily have to be on the same scale, but the principal shown in the film is sound.

 

I doubt it will be a 'norm' for quite some time, but small crews can be sent quite a ways for a few years isn't much of a stretch with a vessel of enough size. A mid sized naval vessel sized ship could supply a small crew for an extended period of time. Oxygen can be stretched quite a ways, it can be created with water, Carbon Dioxide can be scrubbed, and water recycling produces not only oxygen, but can stretch the supply of drinkable water quite a bit. The effects of the lack of a day night cycle can be solved the same way it is in Alaska.

 

FTL would cut down the supply needs of an extended space mission by quite a bit. It is possible that we might be able to reach nearby stars and planets with a small crew in a good sized vessel, and we'd certainly be able to explore the solar system much more easily, which would have a huge impact on the planet. Minerals, Fuel, and other exploitable resources from the other planets, moons, and asteroids in our system would be open to us within a very short time once FTL travel is obtained. Being able to reach the outer edge of our solar system in a week or so rather than months or even years of travel would make a huge difference.

 

Yeah. Running about the Galaxy ala Star Trek is not likely to happen within our lifetime. FTL travel would eliminate the need for 'extended' travel within our solar system. It becomes possible for us to use resources outside of our planet. Permanent or even extended temporary bases could be made for mining. Resupplying such installations becomes possible with FTL cutting down the time and cost of doing so. Useful gasses could be harvested as well as ores.That's a very real possibility if FTL is made functional within our lifetime.

 

Star Trek style exploration is a long way off, but FTL travel has many possibilities in the short term that current technology can exploit as well. I doubt we'll reach the edge of the galaxy, but even short visits to nearby star systems might not be that far off. At the very least it will open up our own solar system to us.

 

 

Not for manned space travel it doesn't

 

even if you send transmissions back at speed of light unless you are close they will take years to reach us from out in the galaxy.

 

It is however the begining of good stuff and hopefully true time space travel one day in our future.

 

Even with faster than light 10 or 20 times faster it would take years to reach the edge of the galaxy.

 

I love the size of space and it is a good goal for us to work together on. Maybe one day it will bring the human race together in a more positive way than we all currently are.

 

I know I would much rather talk about this stuff with people than religion. It is far far more amusing.

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"even if you send transmissions back at speed of light unless you are close they will take years to reach us from out in the galaxy."

 

you need to examine quantum entanglement communication devices which have already had their Alexander G. Bell moment. Its possible our grandkids will not know about communication satellites

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http://www.nasa.gov/content/nasa-ends-attempts-to-fully-recover-kepler-spacecraft-potential-new-missions-considered/

 

Kepler's planet-finding days seem to be over folks.  sad.png

 

On the plus side, there's this...

 

"From the data collected in the first half of its mission, Kepler has confirmed 135 exoplanets and identified over 3,500 candidates. The team continues to analyze all four years of collected data, expecting hundreds, if not thousands, of new discoveries including the long-awaited Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of sun-like stars. Though the spacecraft will no longer operate with its unparalleled precision pointing, scientists expect Kepler’s most interesting discoveries are still to come. "

 

smile.png

 

and this...

 

http://nexsci.caltech.edu/conferences/KeplerII/index.shtml

 

smile.png

 

Thanks,

 

BAA.

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Kepler very sadly enough is actually done with its primary mission.

 

It has become damaged in such a way it can no longer hold gaze on the intended part of the sky. I believe they knew this was coming for the last year but I read that it finally happened and to many of the gyro's are now non-functional and they will try and retask it to do other things.

 

Thankfully it collected a mountain of data and found lots of good possibility.

 

If only we could see outside or past the heliosphere better. I bet there is a habitable planet within 15 light years of us as we speak.

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or closer.  Who know.   With just the plethora for planets found, it has already blown the lid of many astronomical hypotheses.  It has proven beyond a doubt that there are other earth sized object out there.   Since we know life, as we know it,  developed here, then it makes it increasingly possible that it developed on other planets.  Possibly one of these discovered. 

 

So now we have empirical proof that other earth sized objects exist elsewhere.  Therefore,  earth is not special.  It is actually rather common.  Take that YEC jerks.

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