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Complaints About Atheism


roadrunner
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.....or just being nonreligious. I don't mean complaints with the logic or propositions made by atheism. Here's my short list.

 

1. I can count on one hand how many times in my short time as an atheist I've heard talk of love. I was one of those lovey huggy always optimistic Christians and I feel a little out of place sometimes. Most of the time to me atheism can come across as an emotionally sterile truth guided experience. While thats great for helping you eliminate distractions and see religion for what it is, I feel like I have a lot of bottled up emotion (mostly serving others) and the church gave me an outlet to do that.

 

2. Because atheism is a minority viewpoint now where I am there aren't many resources yet. Ex. The church was an excellent middleman for giving and serving. Of course you can eliminate the middle man but the numbers of participants made it easy to jump in and out of service without being attached (well sort of once you sign up for something you don't get off very easy in my church) Also if you wanted to receive help it was there it was anonymous and free.

 

3. Because religion is associated with morality to the naïve and uninformed believer, you lose a little bit of trust in their eyes. Of course this isn't Truley the case but when apologists make the assertion it does more damage than good. 

 

4. I feel like my religious conviction played a part in my advancement professionally. I was seen as a man of faith and it felt great to see a 'big wig' at a church service and then talk religion off the record. The connection you make in the church are undeniable and I didn't realize it until I lost my religion. Its almost like a fraternity.

 

Of course depending on where you are this list may be complete nonsense to you but I wanted to hear what other new (or old)atheists are experiencing.

 

Also I am NOT looking for bullet points providing advice for each of these complaints. Its just that in my life, I seek to improve the misconceptions and problems I had in these areas so others don't have these same problems. Also the ultimate answer to all the above points is to come out of the closet and be who you are openly. If every believer knew just one atheist that killed their misconceptions about nonbelief it would be a great thing and number surely would increase.

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Guest MadameX

Depending upon where exactly you are in NC you will likely be made to pay dearly for being honest. If you no longer play the "I'm a Christian" game and no longer talk the phony talk, well you are no longer in the 'tribe.'

 

If you move to the Northeast, for example, this will quickly become a total non-issue and people will look at you funny for even mentioning it. I am aware of an atheist group in the Asheville, area, btw. (Western NC Atheists, I think)

 

And yes to being open. We need to be courageous, though kind, about non-belief, but prepare for consequences. Depending upon your circumstances, of course. Some people can get away with it, for reasons having to do with personal charisma and ridiculous things like that; others not so much. Be careful.

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I'm lucky enough to live in an area where there are other atheists. I had atheist friends even while I was a christain, and was used to talking about normal live stuff, like finding a loving life partner and doing something good for the world, with unbelievers (though it was quite a culture shock at first, having grown up in the church and christian school bubble). And there's plenty of secular volunteer work around. Granted, it's not the same cohesive, tight knit community that you get from a church, and there's no singular group to go to when you need some help, but it's not as lonely as it would be in a more heavily christian area. The problems I have are more with my family, and christian friends I had while I was a christian.

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.....or just being nonreligious. I don't mean complaints with the logic or propositions made by atheism. Here's my short list.

 

1. I can count on one hand how many times in my short time as an atheist I've heard talk of love. I was one of those lovey huggy always optimistic Christians and I feel a little out of place sometimes. Most of the time to me atheism can come across as an emotionally sterile truth guided experience. While thats great for helping you eliminate distractions and see religion for what it is, I feel like I have a lot of bottled up emotion (mostly serving others) and the church gave me an outlet to do that.

 

2. Because atheism is a minority viewpoint now where I am there aren't many resources yet. Ex. The church was an excellent middleman for giving and serving. Of course you can eliminate the middle man but the numbers of participants made it easy to jump in and out of service without being attached (well sort of once you sign up for something you don't get off very easy in my church) Also if you wanted to receive help it was there it was anonymous and free.

 

3. Because religion is associated with morality to the naïve and uninformed believer, you lose a little bit of trust in their eyes. Of course this isn't Truley the case but when apologists make the assertion it does more damage than good. 

 

4. I feel like my religious conviction played a part in my advancement professionally. I was seen as a man of faith and it felt great to see a 'big wig' at a church service and then talk religion off the record. The connection you make in the church are undeniable and I didn't realize it until I lost my religion. Its almost like a fraternity.

 

Of course depending on where you are this list may be complete nonsense to you but I wanted to hear what other new (or old)atheists are experiencing.

 

Also I am NOT looking for bullet points providing advice for each of these complaints. Its just that in my life, I seek to improve the misconceptions and problems I had in these areas so others don't have these same problems. Also the ultimate answer to all the above points is to come out of the closet and be who you are openly. If every believer knew just one atheist that killed their misconceptions about nonbelief it would be a great thing and number surely would increase.

 

In Nevada being a Christian doesn't give the average person much advantage. At least it didnt mean much with my government employer. Most people don't talk religion as part of their staple conversation. Nobody knocks on my door selling religion. Maybe the homeowners association forbids it, I dunno.

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I used to be the one warning others against "bad influences" in the Church.....  It is hard to hear from others that I am now the "bad influence".  Believe me when I say that believe leaving religion is a personal journey and will not influence others....

 

And yes, I agree, professionally I cannot be a free Atheist.  People have this misconception that I support the Anti-Christ.  Especially over the last few days of Easter.  Whenever people or my clients make small-talk, it is often about their involvement in their local church.  I've learnt quickly to rather not say anything about it.

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 Believe me when I say that believe leaving religion is a personal journey and will not influence others....

I just wanted to see what all the fuss was about so I set out to find out how anybody could not believe in god and Tada here I am. Ironically, I was prepping for a sit down with an atheist coworker outside of our religiously tolerant but sterile government workplace. I was tipped off that he used to be religious but 'something happened'. We have low turn over so everybody has know everybody for decades. We never sat down to talk and I never told him that I've deconverted since consenting to our talk two years ago.

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