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Upon The Death Of A Fly


TheRedneckProfessor
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To beg forgiveness, I have yet to cry;

To plead for mercy, still these eyes are dry.

Why feign the "beauty" of the Serpent's Lie,

When truth and logic desiccate my eye?

From glancing Glory, I, in gloating, shy;

But would this graceless godling pass me by,

And leave this swollen swine unto his sty?

Another "witness"--Here is my reply:

O Cursed Seed among the Catcher's Rye,

That does a knot 'twixt Pride and Pious tie,

And with your airs and honors seek to ply.

O'er-hasty hypocrite, know naught of I!

Vile! Vile! You sloth who are too loath to try

To better--Shed the bed in which you lie!

So let your venom's geyser heave and sigh

And forth its toxic poison to the sky.

What vomit spews each time I question, "Why?"

What answers do you get "through dark glass" dye?

Shove off these guiling wiles so sleek and sly,

You fool whose only consciousness is "My..."

How egotistic! You would deign to pry

Into the chest of one "so great and high";

While greater service to myself do I

To mark the business of a pesky fly.

And yes, to god I've prayed to say, "Goodbye."

The one request his "justice" can't deny,

That he would deem it dead 'tween he and I

For while I live, I will not live a lie.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Ooh that is linguistically delicious.

I loved reading that. I read it out aloud.

 

Is this your composition?

 

I am trying to understand it right but whether I do or not. The words are rich and roll off the tongue.

 

It's about you or a deconverted person who no longer will be sucked into the falseness and fakeness of christianity. And can see right through the deception of it all and the people.

And the deconverted person (author of poem) has said goodbye to god and and are ok with that because he doesn't want to live a lie anymore.

 

Is the pesky fly a metaphor for the proselytizer Or god/religion or the deconverted person? (Author)

Are you the author?

It's the author right? Because according to bible god we are nothing without him and we are dead spiritually without him.

Sorry I've always find it hard to figure out prose and poetry but I like some of it.

 

Those who "witnesss" are hypocrites quick to judge and don't know you. And they don't take the time and are lazy (sloth) to change what they believe and to look deep enough into why they believe what they do. (Shed the bed in which you lie)

And they "think" that they know the mind and heart of "god" and are prideful and pious in how they act.

 

And when you ask questions you are told lies.

"Toxic poison" "venom"

"Vomit"

 

 

Hey is that meant to say "feign"

Instead of deign? "you would feign to pry"

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Ooh that is linguistically delicious.

I loved reading that. I read it out aloud.

 

Is this your composition?

 

I am trying to understand it right but whether I do or not. The words are rich and roll off the tongue.

 

It's about you or a deconverted person who no longer will be sucked into the falseness and fakeness of christianity. And can see right through the deception of it all and the people.

And the deconverted person (author of poem) has said goodbye to god and and are ok with that because he doesn't want to live a lie anymore.

 

Is the pesky fly a metaphor for the proselytizer Or god/religion or the deconverted person? (Author)

Are you the author?

It's the author right? Because according to bible god we are nothing without him and we are dead spiritually without him.

Sorry I've always find it hard to figure out prose and poetry but I like some of it.

 

Those who "witnesss" are hypocrites quick to judge and don't know you. And they don't take the time and are lazy (sloth) to change what they believe and to look deep enough into why they believe what they do. (Shed the bed in which you lie)

And they "think" that they know the mind and heart of "god" and are prideful and pious in how they act.

 

And when you ask questions you are told lies.

"Toxic poison" "venom"

"Vomit"

 

 

Hey is that meant to say "feign"

Instead of deign? "you would feign to pry"

 

Hello JDog. I am certainly glad you enjoyed my poem and yes, I am the author of it. "Linguistically delicious"? While I like how that sounds, I fear you may be a little too kind. Your interpretation of this piece is for the most part correct, though I hadn't thought of the "pesky fly" in terms of a metaphor for the proselytizer, so much as a symbol of the little things that make life what it is, in contrast to the "witness" constantly looking to god. None the less, I do see how your interpretation of the "fly" as a metaphor also works, and I like it. The use of the word "deign" is meant to be powerfully ironic in that, by definition, "deign" means "to condescend"; so the complete verse could be transliterated: "How egotistic! You would 'condescend' to open the chest of your god; while I benefit more by paying attention to the little things that make life what it is."

 

All that being said, it is poetry; and if I learned anything from my first college degree, it is that the interpretation of poetry is often best left up to the interpreter.

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Thanks for explaining. And now I have learned a new word. Deign.

I have had little college education. Just a couple of classes many moons ago.

It's good to know that there isn't a right or wrong as such and the work is open for interpretation. I didn't realize that.

I always thought that a poet would like to be understood and whatever the story or message they want to convey is understood and That there IS a right and wrong.

I write poetry now and again myself and so is it wrong of me to want to be understood And people understand what I'm trying to say. What if someone interprets it and it's way off the mark?

You wrote the above poem to convey your story, feelings and message. Don't you want people to "get it"?

I'm just curious. Figuring out poetry wasn't always my strong suit in school. :)

I don't really know much about poetry and what the rules are if there are any.

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Thanks for explaining. And now I have learned a new word. Deign.

I have had little college education. Just a couple of classes many moons ago.

It's good to know that there isn't a right or wrong as such and the work is open for interpretation. I didn't realize that.

I always thought that a poet would like to be understood and whatever the story or message they want to convey is understood and That there IS a right and wrong.

I write poetry now and again myself and so is it wrong of me to want to be understood And people understand what I'm trying to say. What if someone interprets it and it's way off the mark?

You wrote the above poem to convey your story, feelings and message. Don't you want people to "get it"?

I'm just curious. Figuring out poetry wasn't always my strong suit in school. smile.png

I don't really know much about poetry and what the rules are if there are any.

 

You are correct in a general sense in that a poet will render an offering with an intended meaning to be understood; and since, statistically speaking, people generally fall under a bell curve with a few outliers on either end, the general meaning of a poem can usually be readily agreed upon. However, since each reader comes from a unique background and brings a unique perspective to the poem, the interpretations of the poem's subtler nuances may differ from individual to individual as in the example of the "fly" in the poem in question. Therefore, while there may be a right and wrong way of interpreting the general meaning, what each individual carries away from each poem is really between that individual and the poem.

 

As far as someone's interpretation being way off the mark: When the man said, "I have had enough of apple picking," my first thought was that he was tired of that stupid bucket, and that stupid ladder, and that stupid orchard with its stupid trees. How was I to know he was coming to terms with his own mortality? He should have said something more clear, like, "Do not go gentle into that good night." I guess I was way off the mark on that one!

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