Jump to content

Why Do Old People Love To Eat?


Recommended Posts

I always thought it was funny how seniors flock to those early bird dinner buffets that start at 4:00 Pm in the afternoon. I could never figure out how anyone could eat that early.

 

But I started noticing as my father got older, he started thinking about dinner plans earlier and earlier in the morning. Mexican? Chinese? Italian? Should we make reservations? Order in? Take out? Stop at the store and cook at home? The decisions were endless. Holidays and vacations were worse, half of the time is spent figuring out what/where to eat. Then I started noticing my aunt and many of the older folks talking about food all the time. Like it's one of the only highlights of the day.

 

I think I am starting to see that as people age there's less things in life to look forward to. The sex drive eventually goes, health problems prevent drinking or smoking, and doing drugs other than prescription meds is pretty much out of the question. Food seems to be one of the few things that people can enjoy as they get older.

 

Is this why seniors eat at 4:00 PM - they don't have anything else to look forward to all day?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I think to a large extent it is.  Retired people need things to fill their day.  I'm sure retirement is interesting to begin with, but after a few months what is there left to do?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, right now I'm pretty concerned with eating healthy, watching the junk food intake, not going overboard on calories...once I start getting up there in age, I'm gonna be like bring on the buffet!

Link to post
Share on other sites

In Russia, the grandmas go to the grocery store.  I don't think they shop much.  They just go there and spend time looking around.  They tend to gather around the cheese for some odd reason.  It's almost impossible to pick out a pack of cheese at times as the babas (Russian slang for old ladies) are all gathered around blocking it -- and we're talking an entire aisle worth of cheese too. 

 

I think they just have nothing better to do.  I suppose it's better than sitting at home watching Brazilian soap operas. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have noticed this too, and it is as if the whole day of the older retired person is planned around eating.  My father does this. He gets some definite idea of where he wants to eat and no one can dissuade him. While visiting me, I suggested a restaurant and he wasn't interested because he saw a sign of another restaurant on the highway and somehow it just got into his head. He had never eaten there and didn't even know if it was good.  It was like a big deal for him. We went, but it wasn't so great. 

 

I also suggested I make a meal for my parents (I think I am a pretty good cook) and they didn't go for that idea either.

 

Mike's right, older people don't have much else to look forward to. This is an argument to work as long as you can.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Super Moderator

Young fat people love to eat, too. Just saying.

 

My group of friends (50s, 60s) is all about the next restaurant to try. Been that way for years. We eat out 2-3 times a week. It's a social setting where people of different interests can all enjoy a single activity. However, we don't eat dinner at 4:00. Not yet, anyway.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Restaurants have a dilemma.  They don't make money during the hours between meals.  So they came up with gimmicks like happy hour and early bird.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

To me the obvious answer is that older digestive systems tend not to cope too well with heavy meals just before bedtime.  My parents used to be very careful what the ate later in the day - and hence an "early bird" offer at a restaurant would seem very attractive.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Super Moderator

 

Is this why seniors eat at 4:00 PM - they don't have anything else to look forward to all day?

 

They're probably asleep by 8:00 PM.  

 

One reason might be the cheaper early bird prices. 

 

I remember visiting my in-laws in Florida and having to go with them to the Early Bird Specials.  Funny thing, they were at the age that I am now and eating at 4:00 is something I can't imagine ever doing.   Maybe a Saturday or Sunday brunch around 2 or 3 after being out late and drinking the night before........GONZ9729CustomImage1539775.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

I work with senior citizens as a caregiver in their homes and I can attest to the fact that eating is the highlight of their day, right after sleeping.  Which they tend to do right after eating.

 

The other strange thing I've noticed is that the very elderly tend to be afraid of anything new.  Since the only new thing that happens in their lives is food, they are afraid of food they've never had before.  They also get afraid of going outside (fear of falling, not being able to see well and falling, uneven pavement and falling, too bright sunlight and falling, too dim and falling, and the important need for them to be near a bathroom at all times).  So the buffets are perfect.  They're familiar (reduces fall risks), they're at a good time for seniors to go out without a lot of people (that could cause them to fall), the bathrooms are close and not full of kids (who could cause them to fall), and the food is all familiar.  

 

I also worked eight years at a retirement home, serving meals to the seniors.  Same things -- meals were the highlight of the day, bookended by naps, and there was a total fear of new food.  The supper that we served wraps was the slowest, worst meal ever!  At EVERY table, the servers had to explain what a wrap was and how it worked, and how to eat it -- and insist that a wrap was not an evil invention that would kill old people, oh, they were so afraid of "the wrap"!  The managers finally had to get on the microphone and attempt to explain them, but since the extreme elderly don't hear well, it was still a table-by-table experience.

 

I do like old people and I've gotten used to this.  Meals are actually very simple with them.  There is the occasional old person who breaks the bonds of tradition, and enjoys new food and is able to go outside without great fear, and they are like little gems on the beach!

 

One of my Death Plan rules (working with extremely frail elderly made me know I do NOT want to get to that stage) is that when I am afraid of food, the Death Plan will commence!

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

"Food seems to be one of the few things that people can enjoy as they get older." Mike D

 

I haven't a clue. When I get old Iet you know.   bill

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

"Food seems to be one of the few things that people can enjoy as they get older." Mike D

 

I haven't a clue. When I get old Iet you know.   bill

 

"Food seems to be one of the few things that people can enjoy as they get older." Mike D

 

I haven't a clue. When I get old Iet you know.   bill

Nice ;-)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Define the terms "older" and "senior" please.

My clients and residents are truly elderly.  Often close to 100.  They are also extremely frail and have severe medical conditions and can often no longer take care of themselves.  I am NOT talking about recently retired folks or healthy people in their 80's or 90's (I have some amazing spouses of clients that are still extremely active and driving into their 90's and one wife who is 80 and still goes to work every day as a successful realtor).

 

Why are you asking?  You sound defensive.  Are you one of those old farts?  SHOULD I TALK LOUDER FOR YOU??

 

0-picture.gif

 

Just kidding!  Take some Miralax, you'll feel better in the morning!!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Fuck you. :)

 

I'm still a kid at 60. I admit that I like to save money and take advantage of the "senior" specials when I can, but I think I am at the point where I'm going to enjoy my life by doing things I like, such as enjoying good food (BBQ), Scotch and cigars. Why would I want to live to be 100 if I can't enjoy getting there?

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Super Moderator
Why would I want to live to be 100 if I can't enjoy getting there?

 

Bingo!

 

I've had this conversation with my doctor, and he agrees with me. I told him we were working toward different goals; I want to live a fun and enjoyable life for as long as I can, he wants to keep me technically alive as long as humanly possible. Big difference. If I make it to the old folks home, I'll be the trouble maker that all of them seem to have at least one of. My mom was the trouble maker at hers; they got a big kick out of taking the 90 year old woman to the patio for a smoke.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Fuck you. smile.png

 

I'm still a kid at 60. I admit that I like to save money and take advantage of the "senior" specials when I can, but I think I am at the point where I'm going to enjoy my life by doing things I like, such as enjoying good food (BBQ), Scotch and cigars. Why would I want to live to be 100 if I can't enjoy getting there?

That's the plan!  I'm Queen of Frugal with the boring things in life because life's too short to be cheap with the good stuff!

 

Florduh:  I had one client who basically lived on cigarettes and coffee.  She was too old to light the cigarettes herself (too weak to inhale strongly enough), so I had to do it for her.  She was totally kick-ass!!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

"One of my Death Plan rules (working with extremely frail elderly made me know I do NOT want to get to that stage) is that when I am afraid of food, the Death Plan will commence!"  Amateur

 

My advice: make sure your spouse and at you adult children know exactly what your "Death Plan" is. Sometimes your family can be your worst enemy because they don't know your wishes and want to put off your death as long as possible. I'm not just talking about a living will. I mean let them know whatever it is that you want to keep doing despite health risks. Family, however well meaning, will sometimes want to make all your decisions for you before it is necessary. You should make your intent clear to them before that day arrives.    bill

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

I also worked eight years at a retirement home, serving meals to the seniors.  Same things -- meals were the highlight of the day, bookended by naps, and there was a total fear of new food.  The supper that we served wraps was the slowest, worst meal ever!  At EVERY table, the servers had to explain what a wrap was and how it worked, and how to eat it -- and insist that a wrap was not an evil invention that would kill old people, oh, they were so afraid of "the wrap"!  The managers finally had to get on the microphone and attempt to explain them, but since the extreme elderly don't hear well, it was still a table-by-table experience.

Too funny yelrotflmao.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

"One of my Death Plan rules (working with extremely frail elderly made me know I do NOT want to get to that stage) is that when I am afraid of food, the Death Plan will commence!"  Amateur

 

My advice: make sure your spouse and at you adult children know exactly what your "Death Plan" is. Sometimes your family can be your worst enemy because they don't know your wishes and want to put off your death as long as possible. I'm not just talking about a living will. I mean let them know whatever it is that you want to keep doing despite health risks. Family, however well meaning, will sometimes want to make all your decisions for you before it is necessary. You should make your intent clear to them before that day arrives.    bill

My husband and children know EXACTLY what my Death Plan is!  They have had to endure my rants and horror when coming home from clients full of tubes and unable to function at all, or talk, or  . . . nothing, just nothing, they are a body with tubes in a bed.  My husband also agrees with the Death Plan for himself; like most normal people he's extremely independent and won't live that way.  My kids are both non-believers and have no intention of taking care of me when I'm a tubed body in a bed (I told them I would never do that to them, embellished with rants and horror of adult children pushed to the limits of sanity with caring for a tubed-up parent, sometimes for years).  Even my ex-husband has signed on to the Death Plan idea.  That's my entire family, those four -- everyone else is dead (my family does have a tendency to die fairly young and efficiently, not in the drawn-out manner I've seen in my clients' families) and the few that are still alive (a few cousins) live far away, we had never truly known each other (my aunts and uncles have all been dead for many years), and we have completely lost touch over the decades.

 

PLEASE ACCEPT MY APOLOGY:  if you are currently caring for a loved one in a terminal condition, I mean no disrespect to them or what you are doing.  It is a hard, horrible decision, it's an emotional decision, there is a lot of love (a lifetime of it) involved in these decisions, and it is often a decision made harder by modern medicine that can keep people alive much longer than I believe ethically necessary.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I think to a large extent it is.  Retired people need things to fill their day.  I'm sure retirement is interesting to begin with, but after a few months what is there left to do?

Whoa, you guys!  I have been retired from a regular job for almost 10 years and I've never been busier. Sure there is no structured schedule and we can pick and choose our "battles" but there is alot for this old broad to do with helping adult children, going on cruises with my husband of 45 years, taking care of my 88 year old dad, going on weekend vacations with the family to the Finger Lakes, drinking wine, having sex, etc..... WTF do you young people know about retirement anyway!!

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

"Food seems to be one of the few things that people can enjoy as they get older." Mike D

 

I haven't a clue. When I get old Iet you know.   bill

AMEN, Bill.  These youngsters on here haven't a clue.  Getting old can be a helluva lot of fun!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Moderator

I'm finding that food has lost a huge interest for me as I approach 60 this year. And its really got nothing to do with how much I weigh anymore. Being chubby does not bother me anymore. I'm a picky eater now. I mostly eat to keep my energy going.I just came from an all-inclusive holiday and the buffet was a mile long. My friends couldn't believe the very small amount on my my plate. I walked around and around that table for the last 7 days and could not decide what appealed to me. It just dos not have the appeal to me anymore. Maybe by the time I'm 70 Ill eat like a pig again like I used to Lol

 

However, my 92 my year old MIL lives to see her 3 meals and pretty snacks that I make her throughout the day!! Her eyes light right up as she leans over to look at all the pretty colors and then she loves to smell it!! LOL Its too cute. Then she watches the weather station alllllllllllllll day. Im going to introduce a cigar to her soon to expand her world a litte.......lol

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I think to a large extent it is.  Retired people need things to fill their day.  I'm sure retirement is interesting to begin with, but after a few months what is there left to do?

Whoa, you guys!  I have been retired from a regular job for almost 10 years and I've never been busier. Sure there is no structured schedule and we can pick and choose our "battles" but there is alot for this old broad to do with helping adult children, going on cruises with my husband of 45 years, taking care of my 88 year old dad, going on weekend vacations with the family to the Finger Lakes, drinking wine, having sex, etc..... WTF do you young people know about retirement anyway!!

 

You're quite right.  I live with elderly parents whose interests are fairly limited, so I had a skewed view of it.

 

I'm finding that food has lost a huge interest for me as I approach 60 this year. And its really got nothing to do with how much I weigh anymore. Being chubby does not bother me anymore. I'm a picky eater now. I mostly eat to keep my energy going.I just came from an all-inclusive holiday and the buffet was a mile long. My friends couldn't believe the very small amount on my my plate. I walked around and around that table for the last 7 days and could not decide what appealed to me. It just dos not have the appeal to me anymore. Maybe by the time I'm 70 Ill eat like a pig again like I used to Lol

 

However, my 92 my year old MIL lives to see her 3 meals and pretty snacks that I make her throughout the day!! Her eyes light right up as she leans over to look at all the pretty colors and then she loves to smell it!! LOL Its too cute. Then she watches the weather station alllllllllllllll day. Im going to introduce a cigar to her soon to expand her world a litte.......lol

I go through phases of being a picky eater too.  Loss of appetite can sometimes have a medical cause.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Guidelines.