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The Salvation Of Yahweh?


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What if the Bible is not the story of OUR salvation, but is the story of HIS? As a story of our salvation, the Bible does not make a lot of sense. However, when you read it as a story of HIS salvation, things become a lot clearer.

 

In terms of our ultimate welfare and joy, it really doesn't matter if Yahweh loves us or hates us, whether he blesses us or curses us. Much more important is if we ourselves have love, blessings, and forgiveness in OUR hearts. If we are open-minded, flexible, and growing people, then even if someone bathes us in the fires of hell, we will have joy and will be saved. Our salvation is about learning how to be more empathetic, more courageous, and more wise. This is why the Bible cannot be a story of OUR salvation -- because the things it offers us: pardon by God, love from God, forgiveness from him, justification -- are irrelevant to our salvation.

 

Instead, the Bible appears to be about the means by which Yahweh tries to set hatred out of HIS heart. He tries to set it out of his heart by the scheme of the atonement on the cross. He starts this story with a curse in his heart that would compell him to render suffering upon every other being that he would encounter. But, with the economy of the cross, he pours out his wrath on Jesus, mollifying the hatred in his heart. At the end of the story he is propitiated, and he no longer has the compulsions and emotions that he had at the beginning of the story. He found something that works for him -- a ritual to ward off the fears that dog him. He found a way of stopping doing what he does not wish to do. He is saved when his wrath is propitiated, just as we are saved when our wrath is propitiated.

 

The Bible is a story about the Salvation of Yahweh, and not a story about the Salvation of other beings.

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But if we don't accept his apology for setting us up to fail, murdering innocent, defenseless children (including the one baby that he tortured with disease for about a week to punish David), permitting slavery, and having people killed for picking up sticks on his "special day", he sends us to Hell to be tortured forever. I don't think he's changed very much...

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  • Super Moderator

An interesting thought, but the book ends with all who remain in disbelief being cast into the lake of fire and brimstone.  Also, why the need for Lucifer if yahweh is indeed aware of his own propensity toward evil?

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It's a fun idea to play with.

 

 It does seem to be the case that, as messed up as people are, they are far less disturbed than Yahweh.  He is constantly trying to keep up with the human ethical/medical/technological advances that make him look foolish.  He constantly feels insecure about his position in the universe.  He wants to be Love, Righteous, Holy, Worthy-- but ends up being Spiteful, Vindictive, Petty, Cruel, and Unworthy of worship.

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  • Super Moderator

It's a fun idea to play with.

 

 It does seem to be the case that, as messed up as people are, they are far less disturbed than Yahweh.  He is constantly trying to keep up with the human ethical/medical/technological advances that make him look foolish.  He constantly feels insecure about his position in the universe.  He wants to be Love, Righteous, Holy, Worthy-- but ends up being Spiteful, Vindictive, Petty, Cruel, and Unworthy of worship.

Bless his heart. 

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Interesting idea.

 

Have you read Peter Rollins' book "The Idolatry of God"? Your comments reminded me of that. It's not the same concept, but he talks about Jesus as symbolizing not a way to live happily within our current view of the world, but as a way to break the entire mold of relating to the world. i found his explanation of what Jesus was/represents to be a much more palatable view of the faith than the current Christian idea. He never outright claims that he really believes in the story of Jesus, but he does presuppose/rely on the biblical view to guide his theology. Nevertheless, it was a good read in terms of looking at Jesus differently.

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I haven't read anything by Peter Rollins, but I just read his Wikipedia page.  He sounds like an interesting figure, I'm kind of puzzled that someone with views like his (radically subverting the values of the world) would move to Los Angeles, but, oh well.  I guess he likes good weather, beautiful people, and fine food just as much as the rest of us.

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