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Vacation Brainwashing School


Sybaris
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It's that time of year again where all the churches roll out their new programs to draw in and scramble the minds of the little people.

 

I accompanied my wife this evening to pick up our grandson at a free "sports camp"

 

I wasn't born yesterday. Anything free usually comes with a hook.

 

I didn't know where we were going but as soon as this church gymnasium came into view I had it all figured out. We go inside and sure enough, there's 100 screaming kids in bright orange t-shirts with a cross and the name of the church emblazoned across it. The "coaches" have the kids whipped up in a frenzy and footballs are flying everywhere in a team catch competition. After they're done they gather all the kids in a circle and tell them that they're here becuase it's all about god and then set the hook by giving them all a bunch of candy. Tonights assignment is to memorize the verse on the t-shirt (John 3:16)

 

Tomorrow the theme will be Jesus baseball.

 

On the way home my wife makes a comment that it's good for the kids to get out of their homes and be around other kids to play sports.

 

I asked what she would think if this "sports camp" were held at a mosque.

 

She gave no response

 

I personally think VBS in any form is disgusting.

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Guest Marty

I hated going to VBS so much.  I had to go to church on Sunday, went to day school at the same place Monday through Friday, my dad would sometimes volunteer me to help paint the church or some shit on a Saturday, and then my mom would make me go to the same place during the summer months for VBS.  Vacuous Bull Shit is what I call it nowadays...

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Over here in my area we recently had something called "hip hop hope". Basically it is also a VBS but with a hip hop twist. Really don't think hip hop and Christianity were ever meant to go together.

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When I was a kid going to VBS, it was nothing but fun kids' games, arts & crafts, and candy canes & rainbows Jesus. This nonsense is an easy way to suck gullible children into the faith. Once they're older and begin going to Youth group, the threats of eternal torture if they reject candy canes & rainbows Jesus is what prevents them from leaving. That is certainly how it was for me.

 

I was lucky that I wasn't in a situation in which I could be forced to go. My parents were never believers while I've been around (not sure if they ever were), and my grandparents, the only religious people that ever had a role in my life at all, weren't in a position of authority over me, so I have no idea if they would have made me go if they had been. I'd like to think they wouldn't have, because they are some of the nicest people I've ever known, but being neck-deep in the delusion that is Christianity, it's possible that they might have.

 

I only ever went to VBS a few times growing up and rarely ever stuck around for the whole week because some of the other kids there were assholes.

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Over here in my area we recently had something called "hip hop hope". Basically it is also a VBS but with a hip hop twist. Really don't think hip hop and Christianity were ever meant to go together.

Do they preach Salvation Through Good Twerks?

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I hated going to VBS so much.  I had to go to church on Sunday, went to day school at the same place Monday through Friday, my dad would sometimes volunteer me to help paint the church or some shit on a Saturday, and then my mom would make me go to the same place during the summer months for VBS.  Vacuous Bull Shit is what I call it nowadays...

 

Ha, that sounds like my childhood. Sunday morning church, afternoon meetup with church members, Monday-Friday church at private Christian school, Wednesday Bible study, Thursday chapel, Friday youth group, and Saturday help dad mow the church lawns. 

 

Oh ya, both VBS and Awana were in the mix too. Along with youth group camps in the summer and winter. 

 

Enough with the fucking church. 

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My wife's idea was to send our young son to VBS years ago because she thought he needed to be exposed to Christianity. I reluctantly went along. The first day he came home I noticed he had a cord tied around his wrist. I asked what the deal was and he said they were supposed to leave it on for the week- to remind them they are 'bound' to Christ (!). He never went back after that, I found it disgusting. 

 

Oh yes, he also said all they did was tell 'fairy tales'. I knew then I was doing a good job with him. 

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I enjoyed VBS as a kid, I thought it was super fun. Sometimes I miss that time in my life where I didn't question anything, it all made sense, I could play astronaut or sailor or Olympic athlete and learn verses for stickers without really giving any fucks about what the verses said. I guess the idea of VBS is kinda creepy in hindsight, but I have only good memories of it. I invited plenty of non-Christian friends to come with and they all had a good time and none of them converted. Idk. I didn't get to go to a public school when I was that age (homeschooled...) so being around my friends every day was super kickass in my little childlike opinion regardless of the official reason.

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Even before I ditched the disease known as xtianity I hated vbs. I got suckered ( IE the little fat fuck, non-friend whined and cried for his mom to talk to my mom) into going to one  (he  was the uber religious, our parents made us play with, and or associate with him, even tho we couldnt stand him, because he was a whiny little bitch eric cartman like type). I went like twice. For one thing it was freakin boring, yay, I just got out of school for the summer just to fucking go back to school to fucking sit in church, yeah no fucking way. Now Im entirely against any of the vbs programs. They're disgusting young stormtrooper camps, and every time I see one of the damn signs I just want to throw eggs at it. The level of bullshit, and manipulation they use at these things to enslave kid's minds to the grand bullshit is just sickening.

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Over here in my area we recently had something called "hip hop hope". Basically it is also a VBS but with a hip hop twist. Really don't think hip hop and Christianity were ever meant to go together.

Do they preach Salvation Through Good Twerks?

 

 

jesus.gif

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Update

 

My wife came back earlier this evening from taking our grandson to another round of indoctrination.

 

She told me how he was in a frazzel when she picked him up because he couldn't remember the verse he was supposed to recite.........and of course if he couldn't recite it he wasn't going to get any candy.

 

My wife isn't a fundy but she wouldn't see the filth behind the method like I do.

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Judgments About Fact and Fiction by Children From Religious and Nonreligious Backgrounds

 

 

"In two studies, 5- and 6-year-old children were questioned about the status of the protagonist embedded in three different types of stories. In realistic stories that only included ordinary events, all children, irrespective of family background and schooling, claimed that the protagonist was a real person. In religious stories that included ordinarily impossible events brought about by divine intervention, claims about the status of the protagonist varied sharply with exposure to religion. Children who went to church or were enrolled in a parochial school, or both, judged the protagonist in religious stories to be a real person, whereas secular children with no such exposure to religion judged the protagonist in religious stories to be fictional. Children's upbringing was also related to their judgment about the protagonist in fantastical stories that included ordinarily impossible events whether brought about by magic (Study 1) or without reference to magic (Study 2). Secular children were more likely than religious children to judge the protagonist in such fantastical stories to be fictional. The results suggest that exposure to religious ideas has a powerful impact on children's differentiation between reality and fiction, not just for religious stories but also for fantastical stories."

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