Jump to content

Wtf...is It?


Recommended Posts

Comet_on_3_August_2014_node_full_image_2

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's the Holy Spirit!

 

 

 

 

Seriously if that is a comet then it must have been out past Neptune when this picture was taken.  I think asteroid is more likely.  It looks more like rock than ice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

since is something put up by BAA, probably something cosmic or outer space,,,,,

 

if others would have put up, it could have an ancient sex toy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Likely a recent photo of the comet that a ESA space probe recently approached and matched orbits.  In November, it will attempt to land a probe on the comet before the comet reaches perihelion and orbits around Sol.  The lander will screw itself into the comet (very low gravity).  Hopefully it will survive the close approach around Sol.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Likely a recent photo of the comet that a ESA space probe recently approached and matched orbits.  In November, it will attempt to land a probe on the comet before the comet reaches perihelion and orbits around Sol.  The lander will screw itself into the comet (very low gravity).  Hopefully it will survive the close approach around Sol.

I'm so excited about that ESA mission... I sure hope it goes well. I followed JAXA's Hayabusa comet rendevous mission too, and was pretty dissapointed that the "hopping" robot didn't make it... Here's hoping the ESA lander actually gets a chance to explore the surface.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Comet_details_fullwidth.png?140743577787

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep!

 

It's comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko,

 

The ESA probe Rosetta has just entered orbit around it.

 

Comet_close-up_fullwidth.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Likely a recent photo of the comet that a ESA space probe recently approached and matched orbits.  In November, it will attempt to land a probe on the comet before the comet reaches perihelion and orbits around Sol.  The lander will screw itself into the comet (very low gravity).  Hopefully it will survive the close approach around Sol.

I'm so excited about that ESA mission... I sure hope it goes well. I followed JAXA's Hayabusa comet rendevous mission too, and was pretty dissapointed that the "hopping" robot didn't make it... Here's hoping the ESA lander actually gets a chance to explore the surface.

 

 

Me too, ExCB!  smile.png

 

One question that keeps cropping up in my is, what kind of surface the lander's going to touch down on?

 

Some of us are old enough to remember Arthur C. Clarke's novel, "A Fall of Moondust", which suggested that the lunar surface might be a kind of powdery quicksand.  Any solid objects coming to rest on it began to sink in and were engulfed.  

 

Then there's the real-life experience of the Titan lander, Huyghens, which parachuted down onto a surface that the JPL scientists likened to creme brulee - a thin, brittle crust over a sticky subsurface.

 

Also there's the density measurements we've made of several asteroids and comets.  

Some of them are rocky... no problem.  But others are just loose, weakly-bound (by gravity) agglomerations of boulders, interspersed with yawning internal voids.  So what might look like a solid surface could just be a thin, fragile crust over a huge cavern.  

 

I s'pose the ESA guys will try some kind of radar-mapping or sounding of CG (No! I'm not typing out it's full name again.) before they commit to putting Philae (the lander) down.

 

Fingers crossed for a safe one!

 

Thanks,

 

BAA.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Comet_on_3_August_2014_node_full_image_2

 

the dried remains of the plaster I used to fix my wall with last week...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ROSETTA_NAVCAM_20140809.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Comet_on_7_August_a.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We're going to be venturing into uncharted territory again... twice next year!  :)

 

http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/

The Dawn mission will reach the dwarf planet Ceres in February.

 

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/newhorizons/main/#.U-5vPPk9JmM

The New Horizons mission will zip past Pluto on July 14.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Guidelines.