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currentchristian

"killing God" -- The Essay

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Perhaps my essay, published yesterday at HuffPost religion blogs, will be of interest here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rodney-wilson/killing-god_b_8342286.html

 

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Thanks for the link. Interesting essay. It does seem that Fundamentalists are doing a great job destroying Religion, all without our help.

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Thanks for sharing. As usual, it's the comments that interest me the most. :)

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Comment sections are always priceless. Wendytwitch.gif

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I don't know if you're really Rodney Wilson, but if so, congrats.

 

Blog is spot-on as they say.  And I'm going to buy your book as well.

 

Looks like you have pretty good insights.  For a guy from Missouri, that is.  yellow.gif

 

Just kidding. GONZ9729CustomImage1539775.gif

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Thank you, Mythra. This Missourian appreciates your kind comments. woohoo.gif

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So, I bought this book on kindle, and I'm about 2/3 of the way through it. It's a very interesting read.  I especially appreciated the first chapter on biblical higher criticism and the high percentage of influence it had on "killing god" in the minds of believers..  Especially since that is what began my slippery slide towards freedom.  The book is well done.  It's interesting to see why people deconverted and what they had to say about it.  

 

currentchristian: I'm actually surprised to find that none of your personal religious bias is to be found in the book.  It's written in a very impartial voice.  I'm curious about one thing; and this may be answered towards the end of the book - I don't know since I'm not there yet -   but with the understanding you gained in doing this study, did it in any way have an influence on your personal beliefs about the bible and God?   If you don't want to answer that question, it's fine.  I was just curious. 

 

p.s.:  I would be one of those people who would apply "magnificent" to Ingersoll.  Or perhaps "intrepid". 

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Thanks for getting the book, Mythra. Much appreciated!

I tried to keep the book as impartial as possible by allowing the ex-Christians interviewed to speak for themselves. My goal was to report data, to tell the experiences of the deconverted, and to determine the factors that seemed to be crucial in leading to deconversion.

When I decided to publish the thesis, I thought of writing a chapter on my own spiritual biography to add interest, but decided to just go with the aloof academic style.

I am theistically inclined by nature (i.e., born with a religious inclination), went through a conservative Christian phase myself (thought I'd be a preacher or missionary), but was also homosexually inclined by nature (what a way to put it), which induced cognitive and spiritual dissonance, naturally.

Over time, all of those factors in the book impacted me, too.

Today, I am deistically inclined -- meaning I want there to be Something out there and perhaps there is -- and I still find great treasures in the story arc of Jesus' life -- but obviously there's little evidence that there's an active deity out there involved in our lives. This makes me sad, on some level.

So I hope for a life after life, I hope that everything will be made right one day, I hope for a light when I close my eyes the last time.

And I strongly oppose all hard religious expressions and I stand with the agnostics and atheists and liberal-minded spiritualists against all forms of theocracy and against all forces that would seek to impose their religion on anyone else by means of government power.

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And so I skipped a little to see the conclusion section of the book.  Which I would call "cauterizing the wound".  What things Christianity needs to do to stem the tide of exodus.

Good suggestions for making christians better people for sure. , but in my humble opinion, making a more "user friendly" version of Christianity will be met with hard opposition from the "CEF's" (Conservative Evangelical Fundamentalists)  they will consider it "watered down Christianity" or "Christianity lite". And they are very (ahem) adamant about protecting their turf.

 

I foresee the divide widening and the battle lines clearly drawn.  But, nothing new there.  Human beings have been fighting each other for time immemorial. 

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Ok, currentchristian.  Based on your previous post, you're okay in my book.  And I hope you do very well with the book and your future endeavors.

 

Being a PFLAG, I am of course protective of my son.  Who is a great person who I am very proud of.  So I have particular enmity towards people who cast gays as some kind of sub-human species.

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Likely, you are right. The wound might be cauterized for some, but the divide is clear. I suspect in 50 years, fundamentalism in American Christianity will represent a small group. I hope so. 

Ah, PFLAG! What a wonderful organization! 

You might be interested in this essay I published earlier this month -- October -- for LGBT History Month. 

http://www.advocate.com/commentary/2015/10/01/knowing-lgbt-history-knowing-yourself

Best to you, too, Mythra. 

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