SkipNChurch

SOCIALIST PARADISE: UK Cancels ALL ROUTINE OPERATIONS

Recommended Posts

Posted FWIMBW:

SOCIALIST PARADISE: UK Cancels ALL ROUTINE OPERATIONS Due to Overcrowding

 

Quote

 

The United Kingdom’s National Health Service announced this week that it was canceling all “routine operations” until February, saying all “non-emergency” procedures will be delayed after a flu-outbreak left hospitals overcrowded and under-funded.

 

According to the Telegraph, the nation’s government-run health services axed over 50,000 operations in every hospital in the UK following claims by doctors that patients were being treated as if they were in “third world countries.”

 



...snipped, rest of story and obligatory *clickbaiting* via above URL

 

kL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Keeping this site online isn't free, so we need your support! Make a one-time donation or choose one of the recurrent patron options by clicking here.



Sounds like a result of an unforeseen flu epidemic rather than an indictment of the inherent evils of (eek!) universal healthcare.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Clickbait title is clickbait :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can someone explain to me just how something that is free can also be underfunded? 

 

I mean -- free is free, right?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The underlying claim of the article (that this is a result of evil evil socialism) is nonsense. The current neofeudal regime that rules the UK has continued the course of cutting the funding for the national health service. And cutting. And cutting. Eventually something comes loose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Socialism...that's like Medicare, right?

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm...almost like Venezuela has become, except there, they treat food like Britian does with medical care.  Notice how food and basic consumer goods are gone and the Venezeulan government has rationed it down to the point there is nothing to go around, so they, like good socialists have made everybody starving and poor.  Just give it time, Britain will leave everybody with about as much medical care as there is now food in Venezuela.  

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did anybody else read beyond the headline?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"News and current events", Florduh...also known as 'politics.' It all turns into politics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, florduh said:

Did anybody else read beyond the headline?

 

Come on you know the answer already... :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/3/2018 at 5:04 PM, florduh said:

Did anybody else read beyond the headline?

     Read?  Or react?  Because I reacted once I got to the end of the headline.  Just like I always do.

 

          mwc

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/3/2018 at 9:36 PM, Fweethawt said:

I mean -- free is free, right?

I pay a lot of taxes in Belgium (around 45% is deducted from every paycheck). At first I was in shock, but then realized a year or two later that I can easily live a comfortable life with what I take home....So no, it's not free.

2009 I was in a pretty scary car accident. Was taken to the hospital in an ambulance and had surgery because my head tried to break the glass of the driver's side window. In the emergency room, the Dr brought in a plastic surgeon so the cut on my forehead would heal without a noticeable scar (I'm super thankful the emergency Dr didn't just stitch up the jagged gash) and one month later had to have surgery on my back because a lumbar disk was wrecked. 10 months ago, had a second surgery for same stupid disk and a fusion was needed. I live alone and needed help with grocery shopping, house cleaning, etc... A social worker came to my home twice a week for a few hours to help me for 8 weeks. Out of pocket all the above cost around 800-1000 euros. I did have to pay 400 euros for the chemical clean up my car left on the road. I wonder sometimes when I visit friends and family back home if the same thing would have happened to me and I was still living in California if my insurance would have covered (and how much?) the ambulance, hospital stays, plastic surgeon etc..... I pay a lot of taxes, and for me it's worth it. It's not a paradise, just a different system that has helped me as well as others who live here.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a friend who lived/worked in Australia for about five years.  He had an operation and was in the hospital for 2 days.  For all his diagnostic testing, pre- and post-operative care, and for everything done while he was in the hospital, his out-of-pocket expenses were less than a pair of eyeglasses here -- and I'm talking about cheapo ones, not some designer frames or anything fancy.  He has since returned to the U.S. and wishes he still had the same kind of health care coverage as he had there.  Yes, taxes are higher in Australia.  But our taxes + our healthcare premiums are much higher -- for a whole lot less coverage.

  • Like 3
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, buffettphan said:

But our taxes + our healthcare premiums are much higher -- for a whole lot less coverage.

 

I think it's sad that the most rich and powerful country I grew up in and love does not help it's citizens like other first world countries. The high taxes paid go towards so much more than health care. I almost never see homeless people. If someone has an alcohol or drug problem, they can check themselves in a hospital for care at minimal costs. People with mental illness are also cared for so those two things alone help keep people off the streets and if a worker looses their job, then the unemployment pay is enough to live on...not a lot, but at least people don't have to worry if they can pay rent or eat. The vacation time for an average worker is around 6 weeks and workers have rights, some power and job security. I know socialism is a "bad" word back in the States. I used to think the same until I moved here. I was a conservative republican (like a good little christian should be;) and even listen and agreed with Rush Limbaugh (of all people!) back in the early 90's. So much of my thinking has changed and a big part of that is living in Belgium. It's not a paradise and has it's problems. The people are nice but not open or very friendly in general.... the weather sucks and it rains all of the time (although I like the rain) The language is awful (at least the Dutch speaking side IMO) and difficult to learn. I miss "home" a lot esp friends and family, but I cannot afford to live in the States anymore as I'm not willing to take the risks attached to the American lifestyle....mainly healthcare, but I'm also thinking ahead. Like retirement. I could not afford to retire if I lived in the US and when I get to the age when I may need to live in a retirement home, I know I will be cared for. IDK...the system is not perfect here, but a better fit for me.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ann, although we pay much more to get less, Americans largely see themselves as still better off than the evil Socialist societies regardless of all the evidence to the contrary. I think most Americans can't imagine a world where they see actual benefit from the taxes they pay, so higher taxes are a hard sell here. We already know we won't see our tax money ever used to help citizens.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, florduh said:

Ann, although we pay much more to get less, Americans largely see themselves as still better off than the evil Socialist societies regardless of all the evidence to the contrary. I think most Americans can't imagine a world where they see actual benefit from the taxes they pay, so higher taxes are a hard sell here. We already know we won't see our tax money ever used to help citizens.

 

I blame the constant brainwashing about American Exceptionalism(TM) and hyped-up national pride, what with the flag ceremonies even at schools and such. Fuck it, if a German school ever started doing the same, everyone would be sure it's been taken over by fucking nazi scumbags.

 

Moderate national pride is okay (and might actually be good for us modern Germans too), but at least seen with my European eyes, how the US do it is sheer insanity. Assuming that at least most that I keep hearing is true, of course. If it's wrong, so much the better.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Thurisaz said:

I blame the constant brainwashing about American Exceptionalism(TM) and hyped-up national pride, what with the flag ceremonies even at schools and such.

 

Years ago...I was dating an Italian (kinda why I landed myself in Belgium) and he stayed for a few months with me in Cali. I took him to a high school basketball game. He was in shock when the national anthem was played before the game and everyone stood up. He asked me a lot of questions about this, like why and how often this occurs. I explained that at every sporting event throughout the States we stand out of respect etc... It blew his mind. He thought that kind of thing only happened in the movies. It got me thinking. Why....and why the pledge of allegiance every morning at school? Italians are VERY proud to be Italian. Just ask one;) and yet, he thought that kind of thing was fascist.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, Ann said:

 

Years ago...I was dating an Italian (kinda why I landed myself in Belgium) and he stayed for a few months with me in Cali. I took him to a high school basketball game. He was in shock when the national anthem was played before the game and everyone stood up. He asked me a lot of questions about this, like why and how often this occurs. I explained that at every sporting event throughout the States we stand out of respect etc... It blew his mind. He thought that kind of thing only happened in the movies. It got me thinking. Why....and why the pledge of allegiance every morning at school? Italians are VERY proud to be Italian. Just ask one;) and yet, he thought that kind of thing was fascist.

 

I hate the pledge. I don't care about the under god phrase, I hate the fact that Americans are conditioned to feel goosebumps when the see the flag and hear the anthem as it just makes them support war unconditionally and without question. It's brainwashing at its finest. 

 

Are Italians proud to be Italian? When I lived in Torino, I discovered they were very proud to be Piemontese, but Italian? Never! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Vigile said:

Are Italians proud to be Italian? When I lived in Torino, I discovered they were very proud to be Piemontese, but Italian? Never! 

 

He was more proud of being an Venetian.  He told me that Italians are first proud of the small region they live in, followed by other things (I can't remember) and last was Italian. He often would tell me Italians were responsible for almost every invention (telephone, flight etc) mostly because Leonardo Da Vinci thought of it first. Or if we traveled to a different region in Italy, he always knew what that region was known for...like Umbria has the best olive oil (I think it was Umbria...can't remember for sure), or Piedmont region had the best pesto etc...He was proud of the people and their accomplishments but don't think he was patriotic at all...unless Italy was doing well in the World Cup.  And he was critical of the other Italians and would say not very nice things about Italians that live south of Rome, but when we went to Napoli, he was quick to point out the birth of the first pizza was from that region and we had to go to a specific pizza restaurant (don't remember the name) in order to get the "best pizza." Leave it to the Italians to know or search for the best food;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Ann said:

 

He was more proud of being an Venetian.  He told me that Italians are first proud of the small region they live in, followed by other things (I can't remember) and last was Italian. He often would tell me Italians were responsible for almost every invention (telephone, flight etc) mostly because Leonardo Da Vinci thought of it first. Or if we traveled to a different region in Italy, he always knew what that region was known for...like Umbria has the best olive oil (I think it was Umbria...can't remember for sure), or Piedmont region had the best pesto etc...He was proud of the people and their accomplishments but don't think he was patriotic at all...unless Italy was doing well in the World Cup.  And he was critical of the other Italians and would say not very nice things about Italians that live south of Rome, but when we went to Napoli, he was quick to point out the birth of the first pizza was from that region and we had to go to a specific pizza restaurant (don't remember the name) in order to get the "best pizza." Leave it to the Italians to know or search for the best food;)

 

Yeah, that sounds pretty similar to my experience. They are justified in being proud IMO. It's an amazing country that has some amazing accomplishments and culture. If I could, I'd move back in a heartbeat. 

 

Northern Italians hate the southerners. I love Italians, but they are some of the biggest bigots on the planet when it comes to the North/South divide. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My mind was changed about high taxes when I realized that the big chunk of money coming out of our paycheck for health insurance is probably only a bit less than what would be taken out to fund national healthcare.  Americans need to know that they are already paying ridiculous amounts of money for care that isn't even that great and that higher taxes would just be the same amount of money going out for more extensive care.  It's really pretty simple, but the focus is always on "Oh my god!  Taxes would be so high!"  High taxes or high health insurance rates - what difference does it really make?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Daffodil said:

My mind was changed about high taxes when I realized that the big chunk of money coming out of our paycheck for health insurance is probably only a bit less than what would be taken out to fund national healthcare.  Americans need to know that they are already paying ridiculous amounts of money for care that isn't even that great and that higher taxes would just be the same amount of money going out for more extensive care.  It's really pretty simple, but the focus is always on "Oh my god!  Taxes would be so high!"  High taxes or high health insurance rates - what difference does it really make?

 

If the government was out of it, and they stopped protecting health insurance companies, there would be no such thing as health insurance and actual medical care prices would drop by a HUGE amount over night because there would be no customers and they would go out of business if they didn't lower their prices, basic econ 101. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Burnedout said:

 

If the government was out of it, and they stopped protecting health insurance companies, there would be no such thing as health insurance and actual medical care prices would drop by a HUGE amount over night because there would be no customers and they would go out of business if they didn't lower their prices, basic econ 101. 

You can't possibly believe that health insurance would go away without government "protecting" it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Ro-bear said:

You can't possibly believe that health insurance would go away without government "protecting" it.

 

Such is the way of the religious fanatic. His religion is neofeudalism and its dogma that government = evil, always and everywhere, and private business = virtuous and good, always and everywhere.

 

It's almost sad that he's not likely to ever learn that by personal experience.

 

Almost.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now