end3

Bioelectronic Medicine

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This is a good posting, thanks. I may be a little exaggerated concerning its leading statement on the posted video.. This technology certainly will not replace most medications but it seems it replace some, and in time will likely add to our arsenal of combatants of microbes, as well as genetic, geriatric and other organic malfunctions of the body. 

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7 hours ago, pantheory said:

This is a good posting, thanks. It is a little exaggerated concerning its leading statement. This technology certainly will not replace most medications but it may replace some, and in time will likely add to our arsenal of combatants of microbes, genetic, geriatric, and other organic malfunctions of the body. 

Yeah, I thought it was pretty cool.  Will have to see what develops.

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2 hours ago, end3 said:

Yeah, I thought it was pretty cool.  Will have to see what develops.

 

This is newly-breaking news for much of mainstream medicine. I now expect that we will see much more of the development and application of electrical stimulation and related technologies, on an ongoing basis.

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This is an awesome talk, thanks for sharing. I have seen various applications of electrical stimulation to be very helpful for muscle pain, such as with the TENS units you'll sometimes see floating around hospital floors. I have also heard that electroconvulsive therapy can help a lot of patients with mental disorders like bipolar disorder, major depression, and psychotic disorders, though I have not witnessed it's benefits firsthand.

 

I'm excited to see what further applications of electricity in medicine we will see in the future, and hope to continue seeing research in what Tracey called bioelectronic medicine. This seems to me to be a lot more promising than a lot of other nonpharmacological approaches I have seen people trying.

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The implication in my mind....from ignorance mind you, is the if the brain can be a part of a chemical mechanism, and if our senses are inputs to the brain, doesn't this have all sorts of possibilities regarding input vs the output of the body?  thx.

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10 hours ago, end3 said:

The implication in my mind....from ignorance mind you, is the if the brain can be a part of a chemical mechanism, and if our senses are inputs to the brain, doesn't this have all sorts of possibilities regarding input vs the output of the body?  thx.

 

The human brain is an elictro-chemical organ as are all animal organs. The sense organs are electro-chemistry in their operations, by which electrical signals are both sent and received on an ongoing basis. Animal brains make decisions based upon these electrical signals. The output from these signals motivate most all animal actions and decisions including humans. . Did you have a different idea of how these senses could benefit humans other than in the normal way? or, what was your idea here?

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13 hours ago, pantheory said:

 

The human brain is an elictro-chemical organ as are all animal organs. The sense organs are electro-chemistry in their operations, by which electrical signals are both sent and received on an ongoing basis. Animal brains make decisions based upon these electrical signals. The output from these signals motivate most all animal actions and decisions including humans. . Did you have a different idea of how these senses could benefit humans other than in the normal way? or, what was your idea here?

Thanks.  I have no education/knowledge at all concerning the brain.  My intuitive thoughts are it is not as complex chemically as the rest of the body, but more functions as a switch.  With that said, I can't help think the input....our behaviors, our hearing, i.e. the types of input that do not alter the chemistry in the body so much, may actually alter it just as food or medicine, etc.

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On 3/12/2018 at 9:50 AM, end3 said:

Thanks.  I have no education/knowledge at all concerning the brain.  My intuitive thoughts are it is not as complex chemically as the rest of the body, but more functions as a switch.  With that said, I can't help think the input....our behaviors, our hearing, i.e. the types of input that do not alter the chemistry in the body so much, may actually alter it just as food or medicine, etc.

 

I think you are looking for another way to assist the body to function correctly like the electrical stimulations and chemical responses discussed in your link, and yes, the brain is certainly a means to assist proper body function. But I do not see such a means for cure through the senses excepting through interaction with the brain. Such ideas have found their way into homeopathic treatments such as so-called "aroma therapy,"  music or beautiful pictures to calm unhealthy psychological behaviors, etc. Yes, this is a good line of thought to follow , experiments, etc., for healing purposes.

 

But the brain is much more than a switch. It is the most important, complicated, and sophisticated organ of the body. It is complicated in its number of functioning and possible abilities, in our understandings of its electro-chemical interactions and how it motivates the actions of the body. The brain is the tangible organ that controls all vital human function. Its two primary functions are its voluntary functions and involuntary motivations.  While voluntary responses are mainly under one's conscious control, some voluntary movements, such as walking, require less conscious attention. There are three types of involuntary body responses to the brain such as the control of organ function which is autonomic,  there are reflex responses to exterior stimuli, and lastly there are brain-motivated instinctive behaviors such as a baby's suckling, fear of falling, etc.  

 

All voluntary activities involve the brain which sends out the motivating electrical impulses that control movement. These motor signals are initiated by thought and most also involve a response to sensory stimuli. For example people use sight and sense of position to help them coordinate the action of walking. The brain interacts with all organs and can respond to impulses from any or all sensory organs. When the voluntary functions of the brain cease to work without the possibility or retrieval, the person can be declared brain dead and the body legally disconnected from life support, or allowed to die by non-feeding, neglect, or by chemical or other means.

 

Essentially we have knowledge of a person by their behavior and personality, which are reflections of their thoughts. Even a very healthy young body without the possibility of a consciously functioning brain has been likened metaphorically to a vegetable, worthless except as a possible body-parts donor.

 

 

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