TruthSeeker0

60% of world's wildlife has been wiped out since 1970

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Yes, I read reports like this earlier this year. We are essentially collapsing the biodiversity of the planet. Go Humans!

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A retired professor of biology I know of believes that we passed the tipping point some time ago.

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Subduing the shit out if it apparently. 

Damn. 

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4 hours ago, older said:

A retired professor of biology I know of believes that we passed the tipping point some time ago.

 

Yes, I think there are reports that show we are also consuming resources at a higher rate than can be replaced - and that's for the renewable ones.

 

Here in NZ there was a push to cut a particular fish stock catch quota by 65% due to the severe 4 decade decline its been on.... fisheries lobbied, it was cut to 20 which is unsustainable.

 

What gets me is that ignore GW and all that. Our resource consumption alone is enough to worry about. Fish stocks are being depleted around the world to no return rates. Does anyone realize they won't be able to make a dollar if after the last fish dies? You hear all the old fishermen talking about how just a few decades ago you could go a little way off shore and get your days quota. These days you have to go for miles to get the same.

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I don't buy it.  Where I live, there are so many deer, bear, alligators, racoons, coyotes, and many others, that they have caused serious problems.  Nationwide here in the USA, the increased numbers of deer have caused many car wrecks and it is affecting car insurance premiums to rise in part for collision coverage.  There are more black bears around here that there has been talk of having a hunting season on them as they are losing their fear of humans and causing property damage.  The bigger problem is people who actually think animals are like they are portrayed in cartoons and movies, and don't really understand them. 

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I live in a rural area in Central California. Here's what I have seen in the four decades we've lived here:

- Loss of the Tule fog. This is a ground fog that is created in winter when humidity from rain is high and cold air is trapped under a temperature inversion. Over the years, Tule fog has declined significantly while at the same time rainfall has decreased.

- General increase of winter temperatures. When we first moved here almost 40 years ago it was common for overnight temperatures to drop below freezing. While we still get down there, the number of nights of that has decreased noticeably. This affects the Tule fog mentioned above.

- Decrease of winter rains, and a later start to the rainy season. 

- Earlier bloom of tree crops.

- Increase of days over 100 degrees in summer. Last summer we blew away the previous record (21 consecutive days, set in 2005) and went 30 days straight.

- Significant increase of Brewer's blackbirds. These can be very destructive. Growers across the road from us now sometimes use field cannons in winter to disperse them, something we've never seen at that time of year. This suggests they are not migrating out but are wintering over due to warmer temperatures.

- Possums, now rarely seen.

- Rabbits, now rarely seen.

- White-tailed kites, gone.

- Pheasants, gone.

- Quail, gone.

- Red-winged blackbirds, gone.

- Tree frogs, gone.

- June bugs, gone.

- A little black beetle, the name of which I don't know, has disappeared to be replaced by an increase in earwigs.

- Dead trees in our local forests due to the bark beetle. The trees are stressed due to lack of rainfall and higher temperatures and their natural defenses are less effective. The Forest Service estimates that 129 million trees have died in the Sierra Nevada due to bark beetle infestation. I've seen this first-hand, and it's widespread.

- And a big, big deal here that is under-reported is colony collapse disorder in honey bees. Bees are vital to the citrus, tree nut and stone fruit crops that are a significant part of our economy and an important part of the world's food supply. Recent estimates are that in recent years, hive loss has been twice the normal rate.

 

 

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12 hours ago, older said:

I live in a rural area in Central California. Here's what I have seen in the four decades we've lived here:

- Loss of the Tule fog. This is a ground fog that is created in winter when humidity from rain is high and cold air is trapped under a temperature inversion. Over the years, Tule fog has declined significantly while at the same time rainfall has decreased.

- General increase of winter temperatures. When we first moved here almost 40 years ago it was common for overnight temperatures to drop below freezing. While we still get down there, the number of nights of that has decreased noticeably. This affects the Tule fog mentioned above.

- Decrease of winter rains, and a later start to the rainy season. 

- Earlier bloom of tree crops.

- Increase of days over 100 degrees in summer. Last summer we blew away the previous record (21 consecutive days, set in 2005) and went 30 days straight.

- Significant increase of Brewer's blackbirds. These can be very destructive. Growers across the road from us now sometimes use field cannons in winter to disperse them, something we've never seen at that time of year. This suggests they are not migrating out but are wintering over due to warmer temperatures.

- Possums, now rarely seen.

- Rabbits, now rarely seen.

- White-tailed kites, gone.

- Pheasants, gone.

- Quail, gone.

- Red-winged blackbirds, gone.

- Tree frogs, gone.

- June bugs, gone.

- A little black beetle, the name of which I don't know, has disappeared to be replaced by an increase in earwigs.

- Dead trees in our local forests due to the bark beetle. The trees are stressed due to lack of rainfall and higher temperatures and their natural defenses are less effective. The Forest Service estimates that 129 million trees have died in the Sierra Nevada due to bark beetle infestation. I've seen this first-hand, and it's widespread.

- And a big, big deal here that is under-reported is colony collapse disorder in honey bees. Bees are vital to the citrus, tree nut and stone fruit crops that are a significant part of our economy and an important part of the world's food supply. Recent estimates are that in recent years, hive loss has been twice the normal rate.

 

 

It's happening everywhere. We talk of cold winters now in this area as -15 degree celcius, gone are the extended cold fronts that could leave us at -20 for a couple weeks. 

 

Ticks caring Lyme disease have come to stay because the warmer summer climate now assists them. The number of days with 30+ temps has done nothing but increase the last few years. 

And there's a lot of concern here over the bee population because they are so vital to the crops. 

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Yup, this is a major problem. But it won't be fixed, because too many people take BO's approach. We're driving a mass extinction event. We're driving climate change.  We're driving ocean acidification. We're depleting resources. These are just facts. But those aren't really things anymore,  so we'll just carry on. 

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I still have squirrels and raccoons in my yard so this story is FAKE.

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Alright! Another 30 years, and we can reach 100%! Let's do it!

 

USA! USA! USA!

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^^ Self loathing must be a bitch. 

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You notice that the animals which are complete dicks are the ones who survive anything you throw at them?  Ticks, mossies, cockroaches, parasite worms, flies...  all the cute fuzzy things die off in large numbers, while the bastards who want to suck our blood just keep on multiplying.

Put a cockroach in a microwave and the friggn thing just runs around like nothing is going on.  Now I hear stories about baby moose being so covered in ticks that they lose too much blood and die. 

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Cockroaches can withstand six to fifteen times the radiation of a human.

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If you check it out, IF the reported data is correct, more than 90 percent of all animal species that have ever lived on the earth have gone extinct. What makes the animals around today any more special than dinosaurs, mamoths, ground sloths, and any other extinct species? Humans have a fancifal idea that we are greater than natural forces at work. All it is, is an overblown collective ego not based in reality. 

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On 11/2/2018 at 7:21 AM, Burnedout said:

If you check it out, IF the reported data is correct, more than 90 percent of all animal species that have ever lived on the earth have gone extinct. What makes the animals around today any more special than dinosaurs, mamoths, ground sloths, and any other extinct species? Humans have a fancifal idea that we are greater than natural forces at work. All it is, is an overblown collective ego not based in reality. 

 

When the scientists get this narrowed down to the specific humans that are killing the earth, they will find that it is the white people.

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On 11/2/2018 at 7:21 AM, Burnedout said:

If you check it out, IF the reported data is correct, more than 90 percent of all animal species that have ever lived on the earth have gone extinct. What makes the animals around today any more special than dinosaurs, mamoths, ground sloths, and any other extinct species? Humans have a fancifal idea that we are greater than natural forces at work. All it is, is an overblown collective ego not based in reality. 

 

They're not.

 

However, mass extinction events tend to lead to mass extinction globally. Species that rely on a particular species or something that is done by a particular species tend to die together with said species if it becomes extinct.

 

There are long periods of time where there just wasn't a lot of life on the planet and only a few things survived.

 

In other words, our asses are on the block too. There is a good chance that we won't be one of the lifeforms that survives the next mass extinction.

 

Just like all that stuff you mentioned didn't.

 

When people who aren't religious nuts talk about "the end of the world", they usually mean the end of humanity. The planet itself will probably be just fine without us.

 

We'll probably kill ourselves long before we actually create conditions where life itself is completely destroyed from the planet entirely.

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Sounds like a typical Christian dooms day story sold as fact.  I don't buy it.  It appears to be another fear mongering attempt to try to sell some government manufactured and made up problem, just in time......TA DA ... for an already proposed way to pick your pocket.  

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Fuck 'em. Let them die. If they don't die, let's kill them. Our Brave New World has no room for the animals or the wrong people. Kill 'em.

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There seems to be a basic misunderstanding here with some people about how the food chain works and the consequences of species going extinct.  And yeah as well as a fuck who cares, kill em all philosophy. Why care about anything besides yourself it seems. 

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11 hours ago, Burnedout said:

Sounds like a typical Christian dooms day story sold as fact.  I don't buy it.  It appears to be another fear mongering attempt to try to sell some government manufactured and made up problem, just in time......TA DA ... for an already proposed way to pick your pocket.  

 

It's actually the opposite of that. Cause, you know, in the Christian Doomsday humanity lives on forever. Where as in the case of a mass extinction that impacts humans, we kind of stop existing entirely. No special magic city or anything.

 

I mean it's not like there have been five major extinction events on this planet in the past, and it's not like the dominant species died out in all of them. Pure fiction.

 

It's not like this could be a problem whether climate change is true or not or anything. That's just silly.

 

It's a thing that will never happen to us, because our species is immortal and doesn't depend on anything but ourselves for our survival. We're obviously a closed system outside of the rest of the ecosystem.

 

Clearly mass extinctions don't show a clear domino effect with the extinction of one species leading to the extinction of other species. All that silly evidence is clearly manufactured by academics who buried it all over the world hundreds of years ago so we would find it now and be scared.

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Sarcasm is cute. I don't buy the narrative. 

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3 hours ago, Burnedout said:

Sarcasm is cute. I don't buy the narrative. 

 

It's worth looking further into. Sounds a bit suspect. One reason being that the earth has greened globally by some 30% in other studies, due to increased carbon. How could the earth have greened by some 30% without life corresponding accordingly to the increase in foliage? There's a problem with looking at Haiti where the forests have been stripped down and then neglecting to outline a global wide greening trend in contrast to that. That's one obvious question that comes to mind.

 

Below are several more: 

 

https://qz.com/1443473/wwf-living-planet-report-says-humans-wiped-out-60-of-animals-since-1970/

 

[snippage from linked article]

Quote

The report has been criticized in the past for being too broad and glossing over important details about species loss. One of its critics, conservation scientist Stuart Pimm of Duke University, says there is too much uncertainty and variability across regions to distill the state of the world into one number. The report also “depresses people to no end, and suggests there is no hope,” he told National Geographic in 2016.

 

This year’s report isn’t all doom and gloom. It cited population increases of pandas, dolphins, and gorillas as positive signs of environmental work in action, and credited legal frameworks like the US Endangered Species Act with helping listed species avoid extinction. (The Trump administration has recently proposed rolling back several aspects of the law). The report calls for a “global deal for nature,” akin to Paris Climate Agreement, to set more ambitious conservation goals.

 

Quote

Stuart Pimm, professor of conservation ecology at Duke University in the United States, said that while wildlife was in decline, there were too many gaps in the data to boil population loss down to a single figure.

 

"There are some numbers [in the report] that are sensible, but there are some numbers that are very, very sketchy," he told BBC News.

 "For example, if you look at where the data comes from, not surprisingly, it is massively skewed towards western Europe.

"When you go elsewhere, not only do the data become far fewer, but in practice they become much, much sketchier... there is almost nothing from South America, from tropical Africa, there is not much from the tropics, period. Any time you are trying to mix stuff like that, it is is very very hard to know what the numbers mean.

"They're trying to pull this stuff in a blender and spew out a single number.... It's flawed."
 

 

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Yep, species near extinction because of human activity. I don't buy it either.

 

The rhino's are fine, the kiwi (NZ native bird) is perfectly fine! And those government fuckers are spending millions trying to 'save' it. The Moa - I think that's a 'made up' bird as a scare story about what humans can do. So is the Dodo.

 

Nothing is going extinct to human activity. I don't buy it.

 

Also intensification has no impact on anything. It's only good because we can produce more. Cutting down rainforests helps because we can grow shit crops like corn.

 

1.6 billion on earth at 1900... a five fold increase in 120 years has no impact. And consumption up by even higher increase margin. The plastic pollution - made up. Probably the Chinese.... in fact I think they are going down to our beaches and spreading it cause I see some down there.

 

Not sure at what point I'll buy it all, but its not today. Wake me up when its too late ok, then I might get off my arse and do something. 

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Oh for fucks sake, I think I'll actually find another forum to discuss anything climate or ecosystem related because this is one area where clearly people's political opinions or biases or "everyone is just out to screw us for our money" opinions hold sway. It's really hard to fathom that the basic impact of human activity on the planet is really so hard to grasp.  

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