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ag_NO_stic

Merry Christmas or Happy Holidays?

Question

Am I the only one on here that is not afraid of saying "Merry Christmas" even though I'm not religious anymore? It's not like I get mad if someone says "Happy holidays" to me, like they're just well wishes and good tidings, but I hate dancing around other people with my words all the time..... 

 

Just curious!

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On 11/10/2018 at 2:11 PM, Citsonga said:

Screenshot_2018-04-08-00-38-52-1.png

 

I should've added that Eric Reaves, who's been drawing Hi & Lois for several years now (including the above comic), was my high school art teacher one year.

 

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The thing is, it's literally "holidays." It's the winter solstice, there's a variety of holidays that land around the winter solstice in a multicultural nation like the US. Not knowing what the other person may be celebrating, it's probably best to say happy holidays. Unless you know that they are celebrating Christmas. But even then, they would be celebrating both Christmas and New Years, so happy holidays is still relevant considering that they are celebrating at least two holidays at that time. So it just makes sense. 

 

 

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16 minutes ago, Joshpantera said:

The thing is, it's literally "holidays." It's the winter solstice, there's a variety of holidays that land around the winter solstice in a multicultural nation like the US. Not knowing what the other person may be celebrating, it's probably best to say happy holidays. Unless you know that they are celebrating Christmas. But even then, they would be celebrating both Christmas and New Years, so happy holidays is still relevant considering that they are celebrating at least two holidays at that time. So it just makes sense. 

 

 

Here's the December list

December 2-10: Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday that is celebrated around the world for eight days and nights. Hanukkah celebrates the victory of the Maccabees or Israelites over the Greek-Syrian ruler, Antiochus about 2200 years ago.

December 2 - 24: Advent, a Christian season of celebration leading up to the birth of Christ.

December 8: Bodhi Day, a holiday observed by Buddhists to commemorate Gautama’s enlightenment under the Bodhi tree at Bodhgaya, India.

December 12: Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, a religious holiday in Mexico commemorating the appearance of the Virgin Mary near Mexico City in 1531.

December 12: Eid Milad Un Nabi, an Islamic holiday commemorating the birthday of the prophet Muhammad. During this celebration, homes and mosques are decorated, large parades take place, and those observing the holiday participate in charity events.

December 13: St. Lucia’s Day, a religious festival of light in Scandinavia and Italy commemorating the martyrdom of St Lucia, a young Christian girl who was killed for her faith, in 304 AD. She secretly brought food to persecuted Christians in Rome while wearing a wreath of candles on her head so both her hands would be free.

December 16-24: Las Posadas, a nine-day celebration in Mexico commemorating the trials Mary and Joseph endured during their journey to Bethlehem.

December 21: The Winter Solstice/ Yule, celebrated by Pagans and Wiccans, the shortest day of the year represents a celebration focusing on rebirth, renewal, and new beginnings as the sun makes way back to the earth. A solstice is an astronomical event that happens twice each year when the Sun reaches its highest position in the sky.

December 25: Christmas, the day that many Christians associate with Jesus’s birth.

December 26: Boxing Day, a secular holiday celebrated in the UK, Canada Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, and South Africa. Also the day of the Feast of Saint Stephen, who is the patron saint of horses.

December 26 – January 1: Kwanzaa, an African-American holiday started by Maulana Karenga in 1966 to celebrate universal African-American heritage.

 

However, it just doesn't help when you point this list out to the Christians who will get in your face and say something like "this country was founded with Christian beliefs..." yada yada because they really haven't bothered to learn anything about their own history. Hell, even some secular folks have an issue with saying happy holidays, because they think we've caved in to PC culture or something. Really, it's just showing some respect for diversity, instead of favouring one holiday over another.

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I always preferred the secular saying "ba hum bug", found it really helps the festive mood 😋  I usually follow up by kicking over the nativity scene, sculling the eggnog and spending Xmas in a jail cell re-reading the first half of A grinch who stole Xmas. 

 

Anyone heard of the complaints about using Xmas? One Christian told me it was terrible because it was crossing out Christ 🙄

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7 hours ago, Wertbag said:

Anyone heard of the complaints about using Xmas? One Christian told me it was terrible because it was crossing out Christ 🙄

 

I had to explain that to someone last year. That the X is an abbreviation for Christ: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xmas

 

Xmas is a common abbreviation of the word Christmas. It is sometimes pronounced /ˈɛksməs/, but Xmas, and variants such as Xtemass, originated as handwriting abbreviations for the typical pronunciation /ˈkrɪsməs/. The "X" comes from the Greek letter Chi, which is the first letter of the Greek word Χριστός, which in English is "Christ".[1] The "-mas" part is from the Latin-derived Old English word for Mass.[2]

There is a common misconception that the word Xmas stems from a secular attempt to remove the religious tradition from Christmas[3] by taking the "Christ" out of "Christmas", but its use dates back to the 16th century.

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