Insightful

A beautiful church

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I passed a church today on my way to a business meeting - and something totally caught my attention.

 

The first thing I noticed was the brick building and the words Unitarian Universalist.

 

Next thing I noticed- four or five black homeless people with their belongings hanging out in the front yard of the church.  The church had set up a table and was handing out something to the homeless people I couldn't tell what.

 

I went to my meeting.  On my way back to the freeway I passed the same church. The table with handouts was gone but three of the homeless people were still resting on the benches on the church property.

 

Then I noticed the sign hanging out in front  of the church that I took a picture of and that I now share with you:

 

This congregation believes:

Love Is Love

Black lives matter

Climate change is real

No human being is illegal

Women's rights are human rights

All genders are whole, holy, and good.

 

Then I instantly understood why there were homeless people who felt welcomed there.

 

And my eyes filled up with tears at the beauty of it all.

 

7 years ago I would have looked at that "statement of faith" and scoffed.  Now I look at it and it resonates with me deeply.

 

I can tell you this - my white Fundamentalist Suburban Church with a really long biblical and orthodox statement of faith never had homeless black people taking refuge on its property.

 

In fact, the pastor of that church, a prominent Evangelical, was one of the key signers of the recent statement on social justice and the gospel - the document that warned Evangelical churches that an overemphasis on social justice would confuse and obscure the gospel message...

 

Now I can see that social justice is a thing for the Evangelical Church to fear because the more we take up the cause of the hurting, the outcasts, and the marginalized, the more we realize that the only Justice that will come to this world will be at the result of our hands, our efforts, our toil.

 

 

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The Unitarian Universalists are a hell of lot better than the fundamentalists, fer sure!

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I get the positive message they are going for and respect the attempt at showing love and empathy but my first thought is they are speaking for a whole group of diverse people and in any large group complete agreement on all subjects is unlikely. I would think it should read "our preacher wishes all of our congregation held these values". The bigger the group the less likely there will be agreement on all subjects. The generalisation of the statement just doesn't sound right to me. 

 

Most of the values listed are human rights and empathy issues, but climate change is a unusual subject to include in that list. 

 

I would also have trouble with the "no one is illegal" message. Just purely from a definition point that can't be correct. If there are immigration laws in place that you have broken, then by definition you are an illegal immigrant. You can't choose to opt out of the law. 

You could say "all immigrants are due respect, love, compassion and aid" which fits the tone of the whole message. 

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3 hours ago, Wertbag said:

I get the positive message they are going for and respect the attempt at showing love and empathy but my first thought is they are speaking for a whole group of diverse people and in any large group complete agreement on all subjects is unlikely. I would think it should read "our preacher wishes all of our congregation held these values". The bigger the group the less likely there will be agreement on all subjects. The generalisation of the statement just doesn't sound right to me. 

 

Most of the values listed are human rights and empathy issues, but climate change is a unusual subject to include in that list. 

 

I would also have trouble with the "no one is illegal" message. Just purely from a definition point that can't be correct. If there are immigration laws in place that you have broken, then by definition you are an illegal immigrant. You can't choose to opt out of the law. 

You could say "all immigrants are due respect, love, compassion and aid" which fits the tone of the whole message. 

 

Fair points for sure.  The climate change comment I took as a reminder of the role we all play in caring for our common home - a way of caring for each other.  And I took the "no human is illegal" point less literally and more reminding us of the humanity of even unregistered immigrants - that they are people first...

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