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How Has COVID19 Effected Your Life


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Guest freedwoman
25 minutes ago, older said:

Two headlines just popped up on my Google news feed:

 

New York Post: New Mutation Indicates that Coronavirus Might Be Weakening

Los Angeles Times: Study Reports Mutant Coronavirus. It May Be More Contagious

 

Which validates the article Webmdave posted above: Nobody knows what the hell is going on.

It's all so scary. I wish I could work from home or get laid off. But people need their fuel. The whole world can't shut down. 

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One of my colleagues from work saw me and Ms. Professor at the grocery store this past weekend.  He did not say "Hello", or try to speak to me at all.  His reasoning was, "I figured since you never  w

TruthSeeker0 writes: ____ I've been assuming this isn't going anywhere quickly. It is sobering hearing from people whose parents died, and others who are in hospital fighting for their lives. And

Yup. Spring is the best time of year. Nice photo, Taba. Don't we wish the blossoms on the trees would last for months rather than weeks?   Here's something from the advice column in today's

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Guest freedwoman
Just now, freedwoman said:

It's all so scary. I wish I could work from home or get laid off. But people need their fuel. The whole world can't shut down. 

I really fear for health care workers. They are so brave showing up for work everyday knowing they could get this. Bless their precious hearts. They deserve raises for this! 💗

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You deserve a raise, too, Freedwoman. Hazardous duty pay for sure.  Seriously. And I hope your boss has put in some safety devices.

 

I just checked where one of my grandsons works, at a snow cone stand in a remodeled old style gas station. Folks come to a walk-up window to order. The college-age woman behind the window was unmasked and there was no glass or plex barrier between her and the customers, none of whom were wearing masks while ordering. And they were not three feet away from each other. But  I should not be surprised; this place could have been named Redneckville.

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7 hours ago, freedwoman said:

"Hell Hath No Fury Than A Woman Scorned." Hey if you think about it, this would hurt him worse than a beating. F him! 😈  I guess being a small woman does have its advantages.🤭

 

I'm 5 foot honey. You hold him down and I'll punch his face in. You must never phuck around with a short, cranky woman...especially the ones that looks like sweethearts.....:rolleyes:

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Guest freedwoman
23 minutes ago, Margee said:

 

I'm 5 foot honey. You hold him down and I'll punch his face in. You must never phuck around with a short, cranky woman...especially the ones that looks like sweethearts.....:rolleyes:

Oh how I'd love to do that. Thanks hun. 👊💪😋

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On 5/4/2020 at 2:39 PM, older said:

Yup. Spring is the best time of year. Nice photo, Taba. Don't we wish the blossoms on the trees would last for months rather than weeks?

 

Here's something from the advice column in today's paper that seems quite true:

 

Dear Amy: Responding to the current COVID crisis, I’d like to share the following observation: I think people are becoming “more so…” If they were kind and thoughtful and inclined to be loving before, now they are “more so.” And those of us who were angry and scared and suspicious before, sadly, are now “more so.”

 

 

 

Amy: there are kind and thoughtful people that are scared or even terrified now for people that they love. It's a normal reaction. 

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On 5/1/2020 at 8:33 PM, freshstart said:

I'm an RN. I feel like a leper. I'm an introvert, but I find myself wanting a damn hug. I'm trying not to feel sorry for myself, but. . . .plain and simple. . . . I'm depressed.

The old me would've said bless you. I'll say Thank You, it seems so inadequate now for all you frontliners 🤗🤗💓

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On 5/4/2020 at 10:12 PM, older said:

  

THANK YOU Dave. A very worthwhile article. One of the most interesting paragraphs is this one:

 

So, let go of the fight. Focus on yourself. Focus on your loved ones. And assume the worst. Assume nothing—not the virus, nor the economic downturn—is going to get resolved any time soon. That way, you will be prepared—mentally, emotionally, financially, and physically—for all possible scenarios. And if things turn out okay sooner than you thought, all the better.

 

 

This is exactly what we should be doing. It feels like there's a false sense of optimism in the air. Meanwhile we are sitting in front of a fuckingly huge unknown we simply haven't been exposed to before - how do you predict a future with that? You can't. I'm tired off looking at the TV and these experts - even they cannot tell us what is coming as much of 

it will simply be determined by our behavior. The people who subscribe to the view that this is just the flu or that we'll have a spike and that's it have not read up on the Spanish flu, which lasted two years. 

I've been assuming this isn't going anywhere quickly. It is sobering hearing from people whose parents died, and others who are in hospital fighting for their lives. And of healthcare workers and people in their prime of life who had it, barely made it through, or didn't make it. I'd rather look at my walls and be here at the end of all this. 

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8 hours ago, TruthSeeker0 said:

This is exactly what we should be doing. It feels like there's a false sense of optimism in the air. Meanwhile we are sitting in front of a fuckingly huge unknown we simply haven't been exposed to before - how do you predict a future with that? You can't. I'm tired off looking at the TV and these experts - even they cannot tell us what is coming as much of 

it will simply be determined by our behavior. The people who subscribe to the view that this is just the flu or that we'll have a spike and that's it have not read up on the Spanish flu, which lasted two years. 

I've been assuming this isn't going anywhere quickly. It is sobering hearing from people whose parents died, and others who are in hospital fighting for their lives. And of healthcare workers and people in their prime of life who had it, barely made it through, or didn't make it. I'd rather look at my walls and be here at the end of all this. 

 

The wealthy, the big corporations and Wall Street are pushing hard to get everybody back to work right away. The wealthy always benefit more from everything, and this is no different. But..... the rest of us need to be pragmatic and realize we can't stay at home indefinitely. We need to slowly and judiciously start living again because it could be years before we have vaccines and cures for this. I will start going back to the open wildlife areas to take photos but I'm not planning to go to a crowded restaurant other than perhaps for one with sparse outdoor seating options. Touching contaminated surfaces and then your face is still the best way to contract the virus, and we can train ourselves to be cautious with that. A mask doesn't keep you from getting sick but it puts others at ease for some reason. Hand washing and sanitizing is still the best defense other than hiding in your home for a couple of years. For most people, hibernating is not a long term option.

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3 hours ago, florduh said:

 

The wealthy, the big corporations and Wall Street are pushing hard to get everybody back to work right away. The wealthy always benefit more from everything, and this is no different. But..... the rest of us need to be pragmatic and realize we can't stay at home indefinitely. We need to slowly and judiciously start living again because it could be years before we have vaccines and cures for this. I will start going back to the open wildlife areas to take photos but I'm not planning to go to a crowded restaurant other than perhaps for one with sparse outdoor seating options. Touching contaminated surfaces and then your face is still the best way to contract the virus, and we can train ourselves to be cautious with that. A mask doesn't keep you from getting sick but it puts others at ease for some reason. Hand washing and sanitizing is still the best defense other than hiding in your home for a couple of years. For most people, hibernating is not a long term option.

For disabled people with physical disability, spending a lot of time at home is the norm. Nothing has changed much for my partner besides the fact we cannot go sit out in the common areas or at the park. Eventually we'll drive to out to the country and spend some time there to get outdoors. My norm before this was going to conservation areas with my camera in hand and I'll get back to that. I'll do my best to continue with life as it currently is for now to minimize the risk and socialize only with family. I would rather let other people do the socializing and see how this pans out the next while. I can pay that price easily if it means having him in my life. 

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One of my colleagues from work saw me and Ms. Professor at the grocery store this past weekend.  He did not say "Hello", or try to speak to me at all.  His reasoning was, "I figured since you never  want to talk to people at work, you probably wouldn't want to outside of work either."  Reckon I'm more adept at this social distancing thing than I realized.  

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TruthSeeker0 writes:

____
I've been assuming this isn't going anywhere quickly. It is sobering hearing from people whose parents died, and others who are in hospital fighting for their lives. And of healthcare workers and people in their prime of life who had it, barely made it through, or didn't make it. I'd rather look at my walls and be here at the end of all this. 

____

  

And Florduh writes:

____
But..... the rest of us need to be pragmatic and realize we can't stay at home indefinitely. We need to slowly and judiciously start living again because it could be years before we have vaccines and cures for this. 

 For most people, hibernating is not a long term option.

____

 

Two divergent positions. I’m stuck in the middle.

 

This is the most difficult issue I have ever faced. At what point to accept the risk? I have family on the other side of town. We have not seen them but for a few front porch visits since the end of February. And we are a close, huggy family. It is near impossible to be with them and not hold hands or wrap our arms around each other. The little kids want to have another sleepover. They want to climb in my lap and be read to. When you love someone you don’t really understand the pain of separation until you have to deal with it.

 

On the one hand, my user name will tell you that I’m already in the demographic that would be seriously affected by this. Add to that a serious underlying condition that has compromised my immune system, and the odds of surviving an infection are against me. More on the negative side is that while our community case numbers are low compared to many other areas, the number of new cases per day is increasing. And a significant number of community members are ignoring the safety recommendations; the closures will end soon. One more is that a member of our family is working in a place with high public contact and the owner apparently is not concerned about the virus and has not provided a shield between customers and staff, and apparently does not require staff to wear masks. So even if that family member is careful, he could pick up the virus from a coworker and bring it home. And if we visit we would be exposed.

 

On the other hand, however you crunch the numbers our community is not as bad as many others. Mrs. Older and I are not venturing out beyond the market and a few necessary medical visits. Our contact is limited to our family. But our family is young and they cannot modify their life for us. At some point they may rejoin their wider community. They have to move on and we do not expect otherwise. So do we remove ourselves from their life, and them from ours, for the year or two that it might take before this situation subsides? How long do we wait? A month? Six months? We’d like to be able to see our family today, tomorrow and for as many years forward as we can. I could certainly enjoy another ten. And life is full of risk. A stroke could take me out in a heartbeat. We get in our car and chance getting wiped out by a drunk driver. The list is endless.

 

Yes, we want to see every sunrise we can. And we also get up each morning knowing that our lives are one more day closer to the end than to the beginning — the drunk driver could take us out tomorrow. A couple of the kids are tweens. And in a year a couple more will be there. And too soon they will have moved on from overnights with Nana and Grampa, won’t be entertained by me squirting whipped cream into their mouths, won’t giggle when I tickle them, and won’t be interested in sitting with us on the couch to watch a movie.

 

So do we roll the dice, take an increased risk of death, and enjoy life today, or do we hold back and miss out on important parts of our family’s lives now to increase by an unknown amount the chance that we’ll be able to be in their lives later?

 

Mrs. Older is willing to take the chance. But I’m the one with two strikes on the board, so the decision rests with me.


 

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Tough decisions we all have to make!!! 

 

I'm 78, had type I diabetes for 52 years, and 3 mini strokes.  But on the up side,  overall I have been the healthiest person in the famliy through the years,  never being hospitalized, not remembering when last had a cold, or flu.  BUT, HOW MUCH DO YOU CHANCE IT??   We have family and friends over, and go to their places,  but stay outside and keep distance when eating, etc.  But like older said, not touching, especially little grand kids is difficult.  We get our groceries using all the precautions during "old peoples" hour.  We do some yard work, take drives, and the dog gets more walks than ever before in her life.  Being retired is definitely handy.  I feel sorry for those dependent upon work for their existence. 

 

Wife and I are "having words" now about whether I should do an Enduro ride with some friends.  Traveling separately,  camping separately,  taking most of our own food, only getting food at a drive through (hoping someone in the kitchen didn't sneeze on it) and not touching each other, and keeping our distance when riding, cleaning hands after pumping gas, or using gloves or plastic bags on our hands, etc, etc.  

 

And wife says, "are you going to quarantine yourself for 10 days after getting back home?  What if you have a wreck?"  

 

A LOT OF BIG "WHAT IF'S"!!  HA!  Haven't I heard somewhere that if it don't kill you, it will make you stronger?

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Guest freedwoman
6 hours ago, Weezer said:

Tough decisions we all have to make!!! 

 

I'm 78, had type I diabetes for 52 years, and 3 mini strokes.  But on the up side,  overall I have been the healthiest person in the famliy through the years,  never being hospitalized, not remembering when last had a cold, or flu.  BUT, HOW MUCH DO YOU CHANCE IT??   We have family and friends over, and go to their places,  but stay outside and keep distance when eating, etc.  But like older said, not touching, especially little grand kids is difficult.  We get our groceries using all the precautions during "old peoples" hour.  We do some yard work, take drives, and the dog gets more walks than ever before in her life.  Being retired is definitely handy.  I feel sorry for those dependent upon work for their existence. 

 

Wife and I are "having words" now about whether I should do an Enduro ride with some friends.  Traveling separately,  camping separately,  taking most of our own food, only getting food at a drive through (hoping someone in the kitchen didn't sneeze on it) and not touching each other, and keeping our distance when riding, cleaning hands after pumping gas, or using gloves or plastic bags on our hands, etc, etc.  

 

And wife says, "are you going to quarantine yourself for 10 days after getting back home?  What if you have a wreck?"  

 

A LOT OF BIG "WHAT IF'S"!!  HA!  Haven't I heard somewhere that if it don't kill you, it will make you stronger?

Sorry you have Type 1 Diabetes. That's horrid. I wish there was cures for all this crap. 🤗🤗

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A friend's mother just passed away from COVID-19 yesterday. She was already in a nursing home. I didn't really know her myself, having only seen her once, but it's still sad to see my friend go through this. He lost his dad to a stroke a couple years ago.

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I understand the decisions of the older generation to take calculated risks because they may not have so many years left here and of course there's many other things that are risky when you get older. My own parents are turning 80. They live overseas and I've had to mentally prepare myself somehow, if one can, for the fact that in all likelihood they'll catch this at some point (there's no avoiding it in church crowds) and I'll be saying goodbye to them. 

 

I feel like my life has barely begun. Three years ago I began to "officially" question my faith and two years ago I officially left the church. That was 38 years of being stuck in a fundie church, not being able to socialize with "the world", live the way it did, date, etc. One year ago I met my partner. We've had way too little time together. It feels like in the last two years I've jumped over so many hurdles, with my health, my family, my very stability (religious family threatening to kick me out on the streets) and having a roof over my head, and now there's finally some tranquility and stability in my life and someone to share it with. 

 

And then COVID19 happened. I'm not willing to let it threaten all that I've gained. 

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I thought this would be a good image signifying being quarantined.  

20190510_133041.jpg

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26 minutes ago, webmdave said:

 

Very true.  Compared to what people have gone through in the history of the world, we are extremely lucky, spoiled brats.

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What I come away with is that we are all mortal and so wasting our limited time living in fear of the inevitable is pointless. 

 

"For Camus, when it comes to dying, there is no progress in history, there is no escape from our frailty. Being alive always was and will always remain an emergency; it is truly an inescapable 'underlying condition.' Plague or no plague, there is always, as it were, the plague, if what we mean by that is a susceptibility to sudden death..."

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6 hours ago, webmdave said:

 

Thanks for sharing that column, Dave.  Alain de Botton writes good stuff about all aspects of life, seen through a non-theistic lens.

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