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Appalachian folk magick thread


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Interesting. Mostly seems to try and define Appalachia than talk about the actual traditions. 

 

Magic in the church goes back a very long way. Even Jesus did odd things like spit in the dirt and rub it into a guys eyes. The old testament has peculiar stories about genetics being altered by having sheep breed in front of stripped branches. The story of Elijah has him float an axehead on water by tossing in a stick. The Jews brought back the symbol of the Star of David (nothing to do with David) from Babylon, where the priests learned occult traditions and symbols. The myth of the golum was a demon/servant that a rabbi could conjure to help fight against oppressors. In medieval times, things like bindweed were buried in front of homes as protection against the devil (he would get stuck in the tangled branches). All kinds of Christian charms involving red thread or yarn wrapped around nails were sold to invoke the power of the crucifixion against evil curses or sickness. Catholicism tended to incorporate as many traditions as possible while Christianizing them, to further acceptance of the new faith. 

 

The craft itself of plant cures and such is some of the most basic knowledge of surviving sickness in the woods, far away from doctors. Things that worked got passed down. The mountain witches I know are deeply in tune with nature, plants, and the cycles of life. They add to that the teachings of vibrational energies, and divination via tarot and Lenormand decks. 

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On 7/18/2020 at 11:12 PM, Fuego said:

Interesting. Mostly seems to try and define Appalachia than talk about the actual traditions. 

 

Magic in the church goes back a very long way. Even Jesus did odd things like spit in the dirt and rub it into a guys eyes. The old testament has peculiar stories about genetics being altered by having sheep breed in front of stripped branches. The story of Elijah has him float an axehead on water by tossing in a stick. The Jews brought back the symbol of the Star of David (nothing to do with David) from Babylon, where the priests learned occult traditions and symbols. The myth of the golum was a demon/servant that a rabbi could conjure to help fight against oppressors. In medieval times, things like bindweed were buried in front of homes as protection against the devil (he would get stuck in the tangled branches). All kinds of Christian charms involving red thread or yarn wrapped around nails were sold to invoke the power of the crucifixion against evil curses or sickness. Catholicism tended to incorporate as many traditions as possible while Christianizing them, to further acceptance of the new faith. 

 

The craft itself of plant cures and such is some of the most basic knowledge of surviving sickness in the woods, far away from doctors. Things that worked got passed down. The mountain witches I know are deeply in tune with nature, plants, and the cycles of life. They add to that the teachings of vibrational energies, and divination via tarot and Lenormand decks. 

 

Interesting! I had a great aunt who lived in East Tennessee, in the foothills of the Appalachian mountains, that was basically a witch. She died in the 1980s. Very entertaining woman! I miss talking to her.

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6 hours ago, Tsathoggua9 said:

 

Interesting! I had a great aunt who lived in East Tennessee, in the foothills of the Appalachian mountains, that was basically a witch. She died in the 1980s. Very entertaining woman! I miss talking to her.

I'm from east Tennessee and I'm a witch too. I wish I could have met her and learned magick from her

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On 7/19/2020 at 12:12 AM, Fuego said:

Interesting. Mostly seems to try and define Appalachia than talk about the actual traditions. 

 

Magic in the church goes back a very long way. Even Jesus did odd things like spit in the dirt and rub it into a guys eyes. The old testament has peculiar stories about genetics being altered by having sheep breed in front of stripped branches. The story of Elijah has him float an axehead on water by tossing in a stick. The Jews brought back the symbol of the Star of David (nothing to do with David) from Babylon, where the priests learned occult traditions and symbols. The myth of the golum was a demon/servant that a rabbi could conjure to help fight against oppressors. In medieval times, things like bindweed were buried in front of homes as protection against the devil (he would get stuck in the tangled branches). All kinds of Christian charms involving red thread or yarn wrapped around nails were sold to invoke the power of the crucifixion against evil curses or sickness. Catholicism tended to incorporate as many traditions as possible while Christianizing them, to further acceptance of the new faith. 

 

The craft itself of plant cures and such is some of the most basic knowledge of surviving sickness in the woods, far away from doctors. Things that worked got passed down. The mountain witches I know are deeply in tune with nature, plants, and the cycles of life. They add to that the teachings of vibrational energies, and divination via tarot and Lenormand decks. 

How do you do divination with a lenormand deck? Edit: also I want to be in tune with nature, plants and the cycles of life so yeah that's what I am trying to achieve.

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19 hours ago, LeiaBryant said:

I'm from east Tennessee and I'm a witch too. I wish I could have met her and learned magick from her

She was quite a character! I'm sure that she would have liked you. 

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16 hours ago, LeiaBryant said:

How do you do divination with a lenormand deck?

 

I never studied it myself. My friend's daughter teaches classes in Portland and it said to be very adept at it. It starts by the questioner asking something specific, then she deals a pattern and talks about what she sees. It is similar to tarot in that regard, but the cards and methods are very different.

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3 hours ago, Joshpantera said:

Is there a follow up video about techniques or the practices of Appalachian folk magick? 

She is making a series on it ,I hope the next video covers that.

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