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I'm currently reading (in very small bits) a book called "Why Buddhism is True" by Robert Wright.  I'm posting about this here because I am wondering if anyone would be interested in reading along and having a sort of book-club discussion about it. In case anyone is wondering, the author does not advocate for the more "religious" aspects of Buddhism, but rather discusses the more philosophical aspects as they relate to neuroscience and evolutionary psychology.  (I've only read the first 40 pages).

In the spirit of full disclosure here, I'm seeing a therapist who is trying to get me to do more to get my mind off of work.  (Without saying too much, I am an RN who works in an administrative position in a nursing home as well as per diem in a hospital -  my life feels like all-covid, all the time and its very hard for me to set boundaries, to let go of work). 

A few years ago, I stumbled upon some of Alan Watts' lectures from the 60s on Youtube and I have been fascinated by eastern philosophy ever since.  I am trying (with only fair success) to practice meditation and to do some things to create more balance in my life.  I struggle with sleep as well (work always weighing on my mind).

Anyway, I figured if a few others are bored being confined to home during the pandemic, and would be interested in reading along - I would love to hear other perspective on this book, particularly from ex-christians, with an added (albeit selfish) bonus of forcing me to do more to get my mind off of work. 

If there is no interest, of course that's okay too. 

: - )

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I’d be interested in that!  I’m one of the less spiritual people around here, and very much non-theistic, but I’ve been curious about secular versions of Buddhism and also meditation, so this seems like a good opportunity for me to dig deeper.  I think @Joshpanteramight be interested in this too if he has time, given his long-standing interest in eastern philosophy (I know he’s a fan of Alan Watts). But yeah, count me in.  I already checked out the audio-book from my library.

 

 

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25 minutes ago, TABA said:

I’d be interested in that!  I’m one of the less spiritual people around here, and very much non-theistic, but I’ve been curious about secular versions of Buddhism and also meditation, so this seems like a good opportunity for me to dig deeper. 

Buddhist practice can certainly be as non-theist/agnostic as you would like for it to be.  Mindfulness, Zen, the 4 noble truths, the 8-fold path, the 5 basic precepts: none of them require a deity.  Even meditation and prayer can (and sometimes should) be directed inward.  I practice Buddhism as a simple and practical guide to being a better person; but I obviously don't believe in the religious aspects of it.  Hungry ghosts and such...

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37 minutes ago, TheRedneckProfessor said:

I practice Buddhism as a simple and practical guide to being a better person


Well then I would encourage you to step up your practice ... significantly 😂😂😂

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29 minutes ago, TABA said:


Well then I would encourage you to step up your practice ... significantly 😂😂😂

It's called "practice" for a reason.  😉

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I do like the eastern mysticism, in theory. But I tweak everything about it. I try and look at the concepts through a modern perspective where the pantheism is concerned. Modern minded, and non-theistic pantheistic philosophy. 

 

 

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Years ago when studying the history of religions I read some about Buddahism.   I remember thinking it was more of a philosophy, and remember being impressed.  I also attended a Unitarian Universalist church for a while, and was impressed by some who came there and led some meditation sessions.  Go for it!

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5 minutes ago, Weezer said:

 

And THANK YOU FOR DOING YOUR JOB!  You've got a really stressful job at this time, and not being helped by those not taking the virus seriously. 

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5 hours ago, Weezer said:

And THANK YOU FOR DOING YOUR JOB!  You've got a really stressful job at this time, and not being helped by those not taking the virus seriously. 

I have a feeling you wanted to post this in a different thread.

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Thanks for all of the responses.😁

I will try reading a little at a time, posting thoughts about it here and see where the discussion goes.  I hope others do the same!

 

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I will say that what first attracted my attention to Buddhism was its parallel to the scientific method in the four noble truths.

1. There is suffering (observation)

2. Suffering comes from attachment and desire (testable hypothesis)

3. There is an end of suffering (predicted outcome)

4. The end of suffering is the 8-fold path (experimentation) 

It's not an exact match, of course; but, as the basis of a religion/philosophy, it sure beats "accept jesus or burn in hell" or "fly a plane into this building and spend eternity f☆({ing 72 virgins."

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16 hours ago, TheRedneckProfessor said:

I have a feeling you wanted to post this in a different thread.

No, I did not.  Are you telling me I should have?

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9 hours ago, Weezer said:

No, I did not.  Are you telling me I should have?

Perhaps I'm wrong.  

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18 hours ago, TheRedneckProfessor said:

Perhaps I'm wrong.  

I use a tablet and accidentally touched my own "quote" button, if that is what you were referring to.  Sometimes I hate these touch screens.  I was wanting to encourage freshstart in her nursing career during this very trying time.

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