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Do any of you know if any other religions besides xianity claim their leaders to be resurrected? If you do, can you provide me with a source as well?

 

Thanks.

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Horus of Egypt, Mithra of Persia, Krishna of India are examples of other god-men from mythology who were resurrected after death. Acharya S handles the comparisons well on her site, TruthBeKnown. The resurrection isn't the only common thread in the stories of jesus and the other godmen. Twelve disciples (for the signs of the zodiac) healing the sick, virgin birth...these are other common characteristics of godmen.

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You won't find a cookie-cutter parallel for the story of Jesus' resurrection. Many of the dying / resurrecting godmen are kind of subjective, being based primarily on iconographic symbolism.

 

One of the best examples of a dying/resurrecting god (but christians even will discount this one as too far of a stretch) is Tammuz/Dumuzi/Adonis.

 

HERE is a pretty good article on the subject.

 

 

Appolonius of Tyana was reported to raise the dead daughter of a roman senator, and in Philostratus' work "The Life of Appolonius" - he says this: "Concerning the manner of his death, if he did die, the accounts are various."

 

Some think the Jesus story is loosely based on details of Appolonius of Tyana. There are some striking parallels.

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Another one is Hercules:

 

 

 

Hercules is the Latin name used in Rome for the divinity corresponding to the Greek mythological hero Heracles (or Herakles), the Roman name being a metathesis of the Greek name. He was son of Jupiter and grandson of Theseus, the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Zeus and the mortal Alcmene. He was made to perform twelve great tasks, called The Twelve Labours of Hercules and became a god.

 

In popular culture the Romans adopted the Etruscan Hercle, a hero-figure that had already been influenced by Greek culture, especially in the conventions of his representation, but who had experienced an autonomous development. Etruscan Hercle appears in the elaborate illustrative engraved designs on the backs of Etruscan bronze mirrors made during the 4th century BC, which were favoured grave goods. Their specific literary references have been lost, with the loss of all Etruscan literature.

 

This Hercle/Hercules, the Hercle of the ejaculation "Mehercle!", remained a popular cult figure in the Roman legions. The literary Greek versions of his life and works were appropriated by literate Romans from the 2nd century BC onwards, essentially unchanged, but Latin literature of Hercules added anecdotal detail of its own, some of it linking the hero with the geography of the Western Mediterranean. Details of the Greek cult, which mixed chthonic libations and uneaten holocausts with Olympian services, were adapted to specifically Roman requirements as well, as Hercules became the founding figure of Herculaneum and other places, and his cult became entwined with Imperial cult, as shown in surviving frescoes in the Herculanean collegium that was devoted to Hercules.

 

Roman images of Hercules were modelled upon Hellenistic Greek images and might be contrasted with the images of Heracles that appear in Attic vase-painting (see Heracles). One aspect of Greek Heracles was not adopted by Roman culture: the ambivalent relationship with his patroness/antagonist Hera that was an archaic aspect of "Hera's man", Heracles.

 

 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hercules

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Ask Thurisaz or Varokhar for better detail, but Odin of the Norse pantheon is also considered a resurrected God, having hung upon the windy-tree for nine days to get the knowledge of runes. 9sometimes referred to as Yggdrasil or the World-tree)

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Here is a funny thing. Ask Christians about where does it say in the OT that the Messiah had to be resurrected after 3 days.

 

Luke 24:46.

"Thus it is written and thus it was necessary for the Christ to suffer and to rise from the dead the third day."

 

1 Corinthians 15:3-4:

"For I delivered to you first of all that which I also received: that Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures, and that He was buried, and that He rose again the third day according to the scriptures."

 

There is no 3rd day prophecy in the Old Testament

 

http://www.infidels.org/library/modern/far...l/prophecy.html

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Ask Thurisaz or Varokhar for better detail, but Odin of the Norse pantheon is also considered a resurrected God, having hung upon the windy-tree for nine days to get the knowledge of runes. 9sometimes referred to as Yggdrasil or the World-tree)

 

Kind of, yeah. Although Odin isn't commonly said to have "come back from the dead" in that case, for the sagas don't hint at him having died during the ordeal.

 

He did come back from Hel (realm of the dead) though after trying in vain to convince Hel (big mama of the place, same name as the realm) to release the God Balder who recently got... delivered... to there.

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WOW. Thanks. Does anyone know of a BOOK that talks about all the different religions, their leaders, and how Christianity came from them?

 

And thanks for the copious responses. They are of GREAT help.

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Thanks for clearing it up better Thurisaz. Someday I'll sit down and try to read the Eddas, really... but my Latin is so much better than my Icelantic-- or is it pretty readable in the English?

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A modern group is Self Realization Fellowship, which was started in California by an Indian swami, Paramhansa Yogananda. In his Autobiography of a Yogi, Yogananda tells about various gurus who rose from the dead. In the book itself is an addition made after his "death" in which the county coroner (I forget what county in California it was) states that his body did not rot up to something like a month after his followers say he consciously left his body at a banquet. So two claims of miracles: coming back to life on the part of some yogis he talks about; consciously leaving the body on the part of Yogananda and some of his teachers.

 

I wonder: a) is the California post-banquet report true; B) maybe, did he actually not die but lie in some suspended animation like that which can be produced on a short-term basis by voodoo practitioners?

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Guest santamarana

You won't find a cookie-cutter parallel for the story of Jesus' resurrection. Many of the dying / resurrecting godmen are kind of subjective, being based primarily on iconographic symbolism.

 

One of the best examples of a dying/resurrecting god (but christians even will discount this one as too far of a stretch) is Tammuz/Dumuzi/Adonis.

 

HERE is a pretty good article on the subject.

 

 

Appolonius of Tyana was reported to raise the dead daughter of a roman senator, and in Philostratus' work "The Life of Appolonius" - he says this: "Concerning the manner of his death, if he did die, the accounts are various."

 

Some think the Jesus story is loosely based on details of Appolonius of Tyana. There are some striking parallels.

 

 

Thats a great link.

Thanks

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