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Atheist Exercise For Christians #2


Poonis
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1. Exodus 20:2-17 contains the first set of Ten Commandments (otherwise known as the Ethical Decalogue) on the original stone tablets.

1. I am your God. You shall have no other gods before me.

2. You shall not make for yourself an idol.

3. You shall not make wrongful use of the name of your God.

4. Remember the Sabbath and keep it holy.

5. Honor your parents.

6. You shall not murder.

7. You shall not commit adultery.

8. You shall not steal.

9. You shall not bear false witness.

10. You shall not covet your neighbor's house, wife, manservant, maidservant, ox, ass, or anything that is your neighbor's.

2. Exodus 32:19 - Moses becomes angry and breaks the stone tablets.

 

3. Exodus 34:1 - God tells Moses to make two more stone tablets like the first that Moses broke, and specifically says He (God) "will write the same words as were on the first."

 

4. Exodus 34:14-26 contains the second Ten Commandments (otherwise known as the Ritual Decalogue) on the new stone tablets.

1. Worship no other God than Yahweh: Make no covenant with the inhabitants of other lands to which you go, do not intermarry with them, and destroy their places of worship.

2. Do not cast idols.

3. Observe the Feast of Unleavened Bread for seven days in the month of Abib.

4. Sacrifice firstborn male animals to Yahweh. The firstborn of a donkey may be redeemed; redeem firstborn sons.

5. Do no work or even kindle a fire on the seventh day. Anyone who does so will be put to death.

6. Observe the Feast of First Fruits and the Feast of Ingathering: All males are therefore to appear before Yahweh three times each year.

7. Do not mix sacrificial blood with leavened bread.

8. Do not let the fat of offerings remain until the morning.

9. Bring the choicest first fruits of the harvest to the Temple of Yahweh.

10. Do not cook a goat in its mother's milk.

My question is this:

If God said in Exodus 34:1 that he will write the same words on the new tablets as were on the first that Moses broke, why then are the Ten Commandments of Exodus 34 not the same as in Exodus 20?

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As I remember, there's some verses either right before or right after exodus 20 that say the same thing as exodus 34, just in a much longer winded fashion.

 

Even if that were so, they were not printed on any tablet, to which to compare the second set of tablets to.

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I don't think any of it was actually printed on any tablets. :HaHa:

 

I could be wrong though...

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My question is this:

If God said in Exodus 34:1 that he will write the same words on the new tablets as were on the first that Moses broke, why then are the Ten Commandments of Exodus 34 not the same as in Exodus 20?

 

Well because like most things the Christians have done, A) they got it wrong, and B ) they twisted, changed & simplified everything to fit their faith.

 

In the Jewish belief, there are not just 10 commandments, their are 613 that god gave to men for just about every aspect of their life. There is a simplified list of all 613 that I'll post a link to, it's an interesting read and also will show just how much Christians leave out of their 'faith'. It is eye opening for sure. I hope this helps answer your question.

 

Link: 613 Commandments Aish

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My question is this:

If God said in Exodus 34:1 that he will write the same words on the new tablets as were on the first that Moses broke, why then are the Ten Commandments of Exodus 34 not the same as in Exodus 20?

 

Well because like most things the Christians have done, A) they got it wrong, and B ) they twisted, changed & simplified everything to fit their faith.

 

In the Jewish belief, there are not just 10 commandments, their are 613 that god gave to men for just about every aspect of their life. There is a simplified list of all 613 that I'll post a link to, it's an interesting read and also will show just how much Christians leave out of their 'faith'. It is eye opening for sure. I hope this helps answer your question.

 

Link: 613 Commandments Aish

 

I appreciate your answer but it doesn't answer my question of why the words from the first and second set of tablets do not match, as god said they would be the same.

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And never forget, Xians always go on about taking bible verses out of context.

 

So, to keep the 10 commandments (versions 1 and/or 2) in context you should also obey all the other baloney that IMMEDIATELY follows these verses, about idols and alters, personal injuries, protection of property, sabbath laws, annual festivals, the ark, the temple, priestly garments etc etc.

 

But, no, we'll just cherry pick the 10 commandments, the nice sensible 10, not the crazy other 10 about boiling goats in milk.

 

The bible, some cute fairy stories mingled up with a whole lot of crap, nasty history and bullshit.

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I appreciate your answer but it doesn't answer my question of why the words from the first and second set of tablets do not match, as god said they would be the same.

 

I'm sorry I didn't mean not to answer.

 

One could say as already said, that one was a more detailed description. (?) That being said none of the major religions have the same commandments to begin with. Even tho they use the same book. No one can even agree on those. :shrug:

 

 

 

 

I went and also read up about the shattered tablets from a Jewish point of view, and you might find this interesting, I did. Bold emphasis mine

 

The question I approach is the key to my discussion here. Why did God not instruct Moses to make an exact replica of the tablets he shattered? The Maharal, in the pages cited, writes that the original, God graven tablets, were "unsuitable for this world ... because when Israel received the Torah they were not at the (spiritual) level of mankind, but at that of angels." Therefore, the first tablets had to be broken and Israel had to reach the status of man. Angels, we shall assume, or at least the angels the rabbis had in mind, see everything the same way. There is no individualism, no idiosyncrasy of interpretation among the angels. Those uninterpretable tablets, those tablets for which no hermeneutic was necessary, were shattered. This world's Torah is this world's readings of Torah, and so we needed a Torah which could be read. This is what Moses descended with after he broke the first tablets, and we have been reading it many ways ever since.

 

 

The rabbis seem always to have suspected that we could never have dealt with the first tablets. In the sight of God's writing, the hearing of God's words, all action would have been commanded action. Who would not have responded to such commands, issued without possibility of error? But what on earth would we have had to think about, to talk about, other than the details of obedience? Repeatedly we read that the commandment to study Torah is the equivalent of all other commandments combined. God Himself is pictured by the rabbis as learning Torah. And so, in the Talmud (Menachot 98a-b ), we read, "Resh Lakish said, 'sometimes' (or 'often' or 'he often said') the rejection of Torah is Torah's foundation, as it is written: (Exodus 34) Which you broke. The Holy One said to Moses: 'Congratulations that you broke them."' Resh Lakish's words, in a shorter version, are given also in Baba Batra 14b.

 

The shattered tablets of the Law.(Ten Commandments)

 

 

 

My two cents: A *real* God would have used Rubbermaid for the tablets. :HaHa:

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