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Mathematical Fallacies When Arguing With I.d. Proponents.


TheMathGuy
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I've noticed those who argue for intelligent design tend to make a lot of mathematical fallacies in their reasoning. Perhaps the most glaring error is when they try to argue that the probability of life occuring is astronomically improbable even given billions of billions of universes and billions of billions of years. Of course, most of you probably already know that, but I'm curious as to what kinds of fallacies people have encountered when arguing with I.D. theorists. Are there any arguments that sound more convincing than others? (I suppose my username is likely going to establish me as the local math guru on this forum! I figured I might as well stay consistent, since I'm also known as 'TheMathGuy' a lot of other places on the internet, such as YouTube.)

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TMG,

 

Notice when the anti-rationality folks argue contra *long periods of time* that they demand a uniform consistancy, a smooth transition from one period or era to another, demanding a seamless floor?

 

Then compare their use of the bi-bull and its stories, how things must be patched and pasted to make things work.

 

One hand is full of shit, the other has flower fertilizer..

 

Since we have no clue to how long things have existed, science gives us a decent educated guesstimate, more clues as we explore, technology increases our communal computing power, 'Net meets more and more like minded thinkers, knowledge is helping us shrink the *gaps caused by gods*.

 

Math and allied sciences are doing what the sectarians fear most, making logical sense out of things once taken purely by faith.

 

Pie are square and cake are round, numbers don't lie, but liars usually use numbers.. ;)

 

kFL

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What strikes me is the idea that people who focus so much on emotions for their arguments would even try to use the reason-based concepts of numbers. It is why they fail at it, it is not their natural mental environment.

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Greetings, TheMathGuy, from another math major who just got his BA on his way to grad school.

 

I don't think it's any coincidence that I also happen to reject religious faith. It just didn't seem logical to me as I expect mathematics to be.

 

Any particular fields (haha, pun not intended) of math that you have interest in?

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