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Pwned My Bible Teacher With A Contradiction


Neon Genesis
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I finally pwned my bible class teacher at church with a contradiction he didn't know the answer to. They were discussing the trinity doctrine in class and brought up that bible verse in Matthew where God says that this is my beloved son whom I am well pleased and the dove appears over Jesus and this is somehow supposed to be proof of the trinity. I pointed out that in Mark 1:11, God tells Jesus you are my beloved son. I asked the teacher why was God speaking to Jesus as if he was a separate person in Mark if the bible is so clear on the trinity, because in Mark God says you are my son instead of this is my son, and why did Jesus pray to God if he's God in the flesh himself. The teacher said he didn't know the answer to it and said this was the first time he had heard of this contradiction about Mark. He asked me where I had heard about it and I just mentioned that I had heard it in a podcast. I didn't mention that it was in an episode of the Reasonable Doubts podcast that I heard it in. I just pretended like it was a question I wanted an expert opinion on that I wanted to know in case the other side used that against you when you were trying to save them. I've found that if you pretend to be one of them instead of letting them know you're the enemy, you tend to get more honest responses out of them. The teacher said that sometimes it's ok to tell people you don't know the answer, but then I was thinking about that bible verse that said Christians should always have the answers. I didn't try to push it any though. I did recommend the teacher reading Bart Ehrman's Misquoting Jesus which dealt with how verses about the trinity had been added into the gospels over the years. I just mentioned I was reading it to see what the "other side" had to say about it. It was just random the teacher had all these cliched responses to give when I brought up questions about why does God let suffering exists type questions, but he wasn't prepared for this question that he wasn't familiar with.

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I finally pwned my bible class teacher at church with a contradiction he didn't know the answer to. They were discussing the trinity doctrine in class and brought up that bible verse in Matthew where God says that this is my beloved son whom I am well pleased and the dove appears over Jesus and this is somehow supposed to be proof of the trinity. I pointed out that in Mark 1:11, God tells Jesus you are my beloved son. I asked the teacher why was God speaking to Jesus as if he was a separate person in Mark if the bible is so clear on the trinity, because in Mark God says you are my son instead of this is my son, and why did Jesus pray to God if he's God in the flesh himself. The teacher said he didn't know the answer to it and said this was the first time he had heard of this contradiction about Mark. He asked me where I had heard about it and I just mentioned that I had heard it in a podcast. I didn't mention that it was in an episode of the Reasonable Doubts podcast that I heard it in. I just pretended like it was a question I wanted an expert opinion on that I wanted to know in case the other side used that against you when you were trying to save them. I've found that if you pretend to be one of them instead of letting them know you're the enemy, you tend to get more honest responses out of them. The teacher said that sometimes it's ok to tell people you don't know the answer, but then I was thinking about that bible verse that said Christians should always have the answers. I didn't try to push it any though. I did recommend the teacher reading Bart Ehrman's Misquoting Jesus which dealt with how verses about the trinity had been added into the gospels over the years. I just mentioned I was reading it to see what the "other side" had to say about it. It was just random the teacher had all these cliched responses to give when I brought up questions about why does God let suffering exists type questions, but he wasn't prepared for this question that he wasn't familiar with.

 

Very nice, not in a mean way but sometimes it helps others in that class see how to ask questions. But why are you in bible class in church? Your parents making you go. Oh those were the good ole days :P

Anyways, right now I'm taking a Secular Bible Study. It's very interesting stuff because it's a look at the bible rather than being indoctrinated by the bible. The two sessions ago we were looking critically at Mathew Mark and Luke. Which if you read through them, there are a basic story they follow but once you examine them, it reads like there was a base story (Mark), and that base story was elaborated on by Matthew and Luke who had no idea what the other was saying. It's figured Mark is first because it was the most simple and less creative in writing. Then if I understand this correctly, Matthew and Luke then took another source, now called "Q" or "Quelle" which is German for Source and added that into their story. If your interested:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synoptic_problem

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Q_document

Enjoy :)

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