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I Want You...


nivek
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To get off your asses and keyboards.

 

Please get to First Aid and CPR classes. Update? Get it done. Never bothered? Do it.

 

 

Today, this morning about 0645:

Service Station behind my house, on main road through town, gent walked in, looks like he was in a knife fight, arm cut to ratfuck. Carry a minimal amount of supplies in my guy purse. Ya know, gloves, bandaging supplies, pistol and ammo, guy stuff..

 

Interesting. Diet Coke and deep muscle slices along with the 38 now in pocket, waiting for other actor to show up before po-po and EMS to "finish off job".

 

Got guy off to help, continued shopping... Another interesting day being a shit-magnet..

 

But a prepared one. :)

 

The life that may be saved by a trained bystander may be yours.

 

Get off your asses.

 

k,ShitMagnetForRuralReaches,FL

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I know CPR and first aid. I got the training several times in refresher courses. I had to use CPR in the past and I'm ready and willing in the future.

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No thanks.

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Guest Net Eng
To get off your asses and keyboards.

 

Please get to First Aid and CPR classes. Update? Get it done. Never bothered? Do it.

 

Complied with sir!!!

 

I did CPR training for 8 straight years in the Air Force and along with advanced first aid. Blood and gore not an issue.

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Done it here too. Brush up occasionally. Rarely had to use it for anything serious, but it's good to know.

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I've had first aid and CPR licensing 2 times in my life. Both before I was 15, but nowadays, I'd prefer not to. Too easy to get sued because someone died under your ministrations. Or because they DIDN'T die under your ministrations, but wanted to, in which case it's assault.

 

Doesn't matter in the first case if the person would have died anyway-- Grief stricken people will frequently latch onto anything they can blame in the event of a loved one's death.

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Aye, Cap'n! Ready to do what needs to be done. Unless it happens during lunchtime.

 

(edited to add recruitment poster)

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It's mandatory that I'm certified every other year (used to be every year but we have cutbacks with the economy). Was taught by our instructor that it's mandatory to use CPR while on the job if needed as a city employee (not sure if that's a CA thing only).

 

Last year I thought I might have to use it when a mother came out crying that her baby wasn't breathing. Handed her my phone and told her to call 911. I ran to the baby and seen slight chest movement plus I got a slight response when moving the infant (the eyes barely opened and then closed again), so I assumed the child needed no CPR at that time (It's a little hard to remember all the right things to do when your adrenaline is all pumped up, so I hope I did the right thing). Anyway the ambulance showed up about two minutes later and took over. I was glad to help, but it just didn't feel like it was enough knowing the child might make it this round but was going back to a meth infested household when out of the hospital.

 

I agree, get certified in CPR and first aid, you never know when you may need to use it.

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Acknowledged, Kev. I've had first aid certification a couple of times over the years, but it's currently lapsed. Never had CPR training. I'll keep an ear out for a CPR course at work and get that knowledge void filled first.

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Where I live, there is a 'good samaritan law'. You can't be sued for trying to save someone's life using reasonable first aid--such as cracking ribs in CPR. Trying to do a heart transplant with a butter knife, now that may get you into some hot water. I've performed CPR five times in my life and I've never been sued and I've never cracked any ribs. I've given first aid at three car wrecks and not been sued. I'm not afraid to try to save someone's life. I do hate crowds that show up before I do. Either help or go the fuck home!

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I ran to the baby and seen slight chest movement plus I got a slight response when moving the infant (the eyes barely opened and then closed again), so I assumed the child needed no CPR at that time (It's a little hard to remember all the right things to do when your adrenaline is all pumped up, so I hope I did the right thing). Anyway the ambulance showed up about two minutes later and took over. I was glad to help, but it just didn't feel like it was enough knowing the child might make it this round but was going back to a meth infested household when out of the hospital.

 

I agree, get certified in CPR and first aid, you never know when you may need to use it.

You did the right thing, if uncertain what to do, don't do it. If you are the only one available, then feel for a pulse, if no pulse then do light compressions to an infant to a toddler for 100 a minute. Eye movement does not necessarily mean anything. I've seen dead men's eyes pop open and blink, which is a might bit unsettling, I hate autonomous reactions. Chest moving may not mean there is a heart beat so check for a pulse any way--that is more important. If I don't feel a heartbeat and grandpa's not talking, someone's getting their ribs cracked!

 

Babies are tricky and don't take as much pressure to do a chest decompression, do it with one hand and not all your weight behind it. CPR has gone from giving assisted breathing to doing just compressions now. The reasoning is that blowing someone's lungs with air does not really help to move oxygen to the brain. If the heart is not pumping blood to the brain they die from lack of oxygen. A person has more of a chance of dying if you pause to give assisted breaths of air. If you can do 120 compressions a minute for an adult you are in the ball park--count or have someone count for you. I have strong shoulders and can decompress an adult's chest one handed.

 

Take some training for infants and small children.

 

Once you perform CPR once on someone else, you will not have a problem doing it after that. The first time is the hardest but you learn to have self-confidence the more you use it or the more training you receive.

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