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Help With Memorial


Shyone
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In about a year, my High School class will be having it's 40th anniversary. I have volunteered to do a memorial video dealing with those in my class who have died.

 

Some of the information I have regarding my classmates who have died is sketchy. Before I actually make the video, I at least hope to have the following:

 

1. Pictures (from the class yearbook)

2. Some pictures of the high school

3. Names of the dead

4. Dates of death.

 

Some people posting names of dead are also giving the cause of death.

 

I have written some music for the background video which can be found here;

http://www.mediafire.com/file/bvznznro31t/McHi3g.mp3

 

I have some bits of "poetry" and wisdom, but I don't know how best to organize it, and I am interested in particularly moving passages about Friends passing away if you know of any. FWIW, we were entering "The Age of Aquarius", and we were, in some regards, "flower children." Aids blind-sided our generation, and there were overdoses and suicides. No glorious deaths.

 

Below is what I have so far (after a few minutes of fumbling around):

 

In 1971, we had dreams and We are still Stardust.

40 years later, we can look back and be glad to be here.

Some are no longer with us, and Death has taken them.

With each loss, we lose a part of ourselves; a part of our history.

Each death diminishes us all, because we are tied together by time, friendship, history, love.

The Bell will toll, and we know it tolls for us.

We cannot stop it, but we can remember, and keep them in our hearts.

 

“Death, a necessary end,

Will come when it will come.” (Shakespeare: Julius Caesar)

 

We leave behind a bit of ourselves wherever we have been.

From the starting gate of life, we race for the end,

In our hearts we carry our friends,

But We don’t win the race; it is the race that wins.

 

------------------------------------------------------------

 

If anything in the writing or music is just terribly corny, tacky, please point it out. I promise not to take offense.

 

Also, if someone has some particular images that may be interesting and relate to this, feel free to suggest them. The school, however is located in South Texas and so mountains, pine trees, snow and any river but the Rio Grande wouldn't fit very well.

 

Thanks.

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Sorry, but I couldn't download or listen to your music selection, I got a message about not being logged in or having the right browser.

 

I don't quite know if some of what you have written here is a little melodramatic or not. Sounds pretty good to me.

 

“Death, a necessary end,

Will come when it will come.” (Shakespeare: Julius Caesar)

 

 

This quote might be OK in the greater context of your presentation; however I found it a bit harsh. Maybe. Maybe I was looking for something along the lines of "we never know how much time we have..." kind of thing.

 

Most of this sounds pretty good, already, though Shyone. You would have made a good minister.

 

Oops.

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Sorry, but I couldn't download or listen to your music selection, I got a message about not being logged in or having the right browser.

 

I don't quite know if some of what you have written here is a little melodramatic or not. Sounds pretty good to me.

 

“Death, a necessary end,

Will come when it will come.” (Shakespeare: Julius Caesar)

 

 

This quote might be OK in the greater context of your presentation; however I found it a bit harsh. Maybe. Maybe I was looking for something along the lines of "we never know how much time we have..." kind of thing.

 

Most of this sounds pretty good, already, though Shyone. You would have made a good minister.

 

Oops.

I can understand that I might have made a good minister. I seriously considered it.

 

That or teaching, but medicine won out.

 

For the "middle" I've decided to go with:

 

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.

At the going down of the sun and in the morning

We will remember them.

 

I'm looking for a quote now that joins friendship, activities enjoyed, and parting with friends. Tough to find something like that, but I know it's out there.

 

I'll also need something at the end after all of the names of the dead have been represented.

 

)Oh, and the music has changed a bit anyway. Starts with a slow Washington and Lee Swing with Reverb accented with trumpets with echoes. Then on to my part of the composition which is slow and "sad" but with pride. If that makes sense.)

 

Any ideas about quotes for the situations described above?

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Well, I don't have any great quotes for you, I'm terrible at those things - I'll see some I love, but very few that I actually remember over time.

 

I did want to say that what you have so far sounds great to me - touching, caring, without being all blubbery.

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Well, I don't have any great quotes for you, I'm terrible at those things - I'll see some I love, but very few that I actually remember over time.

 

I did want to say that what you have so far sounds great to me - touching, caring, without being all blubbery.

Thanks. I'm about done with the framework (unless I radically change something...).

 

I'm working on a "poem" for the end. I've exhausted the "lost friend" theme, so now I'm going to write something that says (in rhyme I hope):

 

We entered this building (these doors) [of the high school] as children

and parted as adults.

We walked these halls and learned, and left with more than education. We left with humanity.

Those who have died have only reached the destination that we all have.

Life is short, and there is much living to do.

On the rest of this brief journey, let us take our friends with us in our hearts.

 

That is the essence of the sentiment I'm aiming for. It sure doesn't look much like a poem now.

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Ok, in keeping with the above sentiments, this is the poem (perhaps not finished).

 

We came as children to these halls

and grew together within these walls.

 

A bond has been formed that cannot be broken,

Our lost are still with us whene’re their names are spoken.

 

Our race to the grave starts the day life begins,

But we don’t win the race; it is the race that wins.

 

For these who have died, their work is done

But we too will pass, one by one.

 

Let’s keep a tradition year after year

And toast our friendship with whatever is near.

 

So raise up your glass, until there are none,

And say "We are the class of '71".

 

Suggestions on better wording? Better formatting (e.g. same number of syllables per line...)?

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