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Goodbye Jesus

Hell In The Old Testament


GettingDown

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Hi! This just popped up.

 

Where is it? Why does it only come up in the New Testament? Hearing you guys thoughts would be great!

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Daniel 12:2 is the ONLY place I've ever seen any possiblemention of eternal punishment. The phrasing is vague renough that you can't get much out of it. And of course, there's no mention of Jesus.

 

Hope that helps! I can say more when I'm not posting from my phone.

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From what I've been told, the NT talks of 3 Hells. 1 being Tartaus, a few being Hades and most of it of Gehenna. Tartaus is only mentioned in one of the Peter verses, I think. It means a place of darkness. (2 Peter 2:4) It seems like this Hell is temporary, imo. Hades is mentioned 10 times in the NT. It simply means the grave. (e.g: this Revelation verse: Hell/Hades cast in the lake of fire.) and Gehenna is mentioned 12 times in the NT, which means a place of burning. It isn't Hell, it's a dump in South Jerusalem, or what I've been told. I could be wrong though but very close. Hope this helps. 

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There is no "hell" in the whole bible.  In the old testament, there is only "SHEOL", the grave.  In the New Testament there are greek mythololgy places....Tartartus, Hades and Gehenna.  ALL four of these words are mistranslated as HELL by the King James translator mindfuckers.

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There is no "hell" in the whole bible.  In the old testament, there is only "SHEOL", the grave.  In the New Testament there are greek mythololgy places....Tartartus, Hades and Gehenna.  ALL four of these words are mistranslated as HELL by the King James translator mindfuckers.

 

If I may offer a correction here, Gehenna is the Valley of the Son of Hinnom referened in Jeremiah 7:31, and is thus of at least loosely Hebraic origin.  The New Testament is of course a Western European (i.e. Greek) document and will thus include a large number of references to Greek myths.  But whenever eternal torment is mentioned, it is in reference to Gehenna, which is probably the only word that could rightly be called "hell."  It's mentioned 13 times, twelve from the lips of Jesus.  Something to think about the next time someone claims that Jesus is a "good moral teacher."

 

Of course the idea of eternal conscious torment isn't a Hebraic concept.  It's introduced in Greek mythology, but even there Hades is a place where the dead rest in a state of half-slumber, not torment.  Still, I think this is further evidence that Christianity is fundamentally a Western European religion which can't claim to be a natural extension of Hebraic thought.

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