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Sell All You Have For Jesus


chrisdownunder
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chrisdownunder

 

I did that several times during the years. It isn't that I thought my possessions were sinful. It's that I was trying to be more "dedicated" by "denying myself" and putting the "kingdom of god" first. I WANT MY STUFF BACK!

 

Thanks for posting this topic.

 

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Thats more to the reality of whats going on.
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chrisdownunder

 

I did that several times during the years. It isn't that I thought my possessions were sinful. It's that I was trying to be more "dedicated" by "denying myself" and putting the "kingdom of god" first. I WANT MY STUFF BACK!

 

Thanks for posting this topic.

 

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Selling your stuff for Jesus makes Him very happy, I don't know why....maybe enjoying yourself upsets Him.......as if being the King of the Universe isn't enough for Him

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I was always conflicted by the opposing viewpoints in the Bible.  

 

The widow giving any her last coins is plugged as an ideal (Lk 21:1-4)-- but if you don't take care of your family your worse than an unbeliever (1 Tim 5:8)-- and a good man saves money and leaves an inheritance to his children's children (Prov 13:22)-- and then of course God blesses the faithful with riches (Mal 3:10)...

 

Easy solution-- give it all away, save it, and store it up simultaneously...

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Your stuff is not sinful. The people who want you to sell it and give them the money, or give them money in other ways, for some nebulous reward in heaven as you struggle for financial peace (and the pastor drives a nice car and the church adds that fancy new fellowship wing) -- they are sinful.

 

Of course, once you get out of the religious nonsense, you realize "sin" is a sick, fake concept. So what those people are doing to you is immoral, or whatever you want to call it. They prey on our fears of whether we have given enough (time, talent, money) to deserve God's love (even though they say love and salvation are free gifts of God, wth?) -- all to their advantage. That's what makes the organization look good. All those free musicians giving hours of prep and rehearsal time, not to mention their younger years of paying for and suffering through all those music lessons? Yep, makes the service look good. That pretty church landscaping that members paid for and help to maintain with their free labor? Yep, makes them look good. There's no need for me to go on.

 

Your stuff is not sinful. (Unless you have acquired it in illegal or unethical ways, or are using it for evil purposes, or denying feeding your children because you're obsessed with buying your own personal stuff, etc.) You are a valuable human being and you deserve to enjoy the fruits of your labor.

 

Surround yourself with things that bring you joy and comfort, what you can afford. Be happy. Screw that religious nonsense. Enjoy being a human and the little pleasures this life has to offer. Find your peace.

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Your stuff is not sinful. The people who want you to sell it and give them the money, or give them money in other ways, for some nebulous reward in heaven as you struggle for financial peace (and the pastor drives a nice car and the church adds that fancy new fellowship wing) -- they are sinful.

 

Of course, once you get out of the religious nonsense, you realize "sin" is a sick, fake concept. So what those people are doing to you is immoral, or whatever you want to call it. They prey on our fears of whether we have given enough (time, talent, money) to deserve God's love (even though they say love and salvation are free gifts of God, wth?) -- all to their advantage. That's what makes the organization look good. All those free musicians giving hours of prep and rehearsal time, not to mention their younger years of paying for and suffering through all those music lessons? Yep, makes the service look good. That pretty church landscaping that members paid for and help to maintain with their free labor? Yep, makes them look good. There's no need for me to go on.

 

Your stuff is not sinful. (Unless you have acquired it in illegal or unethical ways, or are using it for evil purposes, or denying feeding your children because you're obsessed with buying your own personal stuff, etc.) You are a valuable human being and you deserve to enjoy the fruits of your labor.

 

Surround yourself with things that bring you joy and comfort, what you can afford. Be happy. Screw that religious nonsense. Enjoy being a human and the little pleasures this life has to offer. Find your peace.

MMM K
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I used to think having wealth was "sinful" too.  I thought being a poor schmuck and giving away everything I owned, made me more "christ-like".

 

Nowadays, I don't want to be like Christ at ALL!  Fuck him and his disturbing puritanism.Wendyloser.gif   I am raking in huge amounts of cash, living a hedonist lifestyle and laughing at all the silly christian morals that mean absolutely nothing.GONZ9729CustomImage1687979.gif

 

Make money, get laid, have fun.  I am a sinful demon-possesed emissary of Satan. zDuivel7.gif

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I've heard lot of sermons on this verse and have decided that Jesus (assuming there was really a person who said these things) was being sarcastic, and actually used much more sarcasm than most people realize.  He was intentionally pushing the rich man's buttons.  But yeah, the message is still contrary to what most American Christians actually practice.

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I've heard lot of sermons on this verse and have decided that Jesus (assuming there was really a person who said these things) was being sarcastic, and actually used much more sarcasm than most people realize.  He was intentionally pushing the rich man's buttons.  But yeah, the message is still contrary to what most American Christians actually practice.

 

I believe it was in Bill Maher's Religious where he gets into a mild argument with a mega church pastor about jesus condemning the rich.  Maher quotes the verse verbatim, and the pastor tried to correct him but couldn't remember the verse...

 

Here it is.  The whole section is great, but what I refer to is at 2:45...

 

 

 

How anyone could deny jesus was against the rich seems beyond the pale to me, but christians only pick the verses they like, so I guess I shouldn't be surprised...

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Sorry I have been away, I have had to attend to my material matters. I've lost so much shit, and it's going to take me the rest of the year to get it all back. From now on if that voice in my head ever tells me again to give all my possessions up for jesus. I'll reply, "let jesus appear before me and he can tell me himself"

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Every time I return to the christian belief system I end up selling most of my belongings. My beliefs keep telling me all my stuff is sinfull and I must get rid of it for jesus.

 

Actually Prophyry takes an intresting view on this

 

He states that Christianity was for gullable people,  Those inside the Christian fold are told to give all their riches to the poor - However as Prophyry notes when they have done so these Christians are now 'Poor' and are indeed beggers.

 

He also noted that Jesus seemed to have a problem with Riches - In that anyone who earnestly worked hard to build a nice future on this God forsaken planet - Jesus then took away heaven from them - It was inconsistent in that a Begger needed food and as such giving away all that one had to 'Beggers' made others 'Richer' and themselves poorer.

 

E.g.

 

10 Beggers and 1 Rich Man

 

1 Rich Man gives his money to these 10 beggers.  This then means that the Beggers are richer than the rich man.

 

The richman then becomes a begger and the cycle starts over.

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I've heard lot of sermons on this verse and have decided that Jesus (assuming there was really a person who said these things) was being sarcastic, and actually used much more sarcasm than most people realize.  He was intentionally pushing the rich man's buttons.  But yeah, the message is still contrary to what most American Christians actually practice.

The Sermon on the Mount, verses like "don't lay up treasures on earth" and such seem to indicate Jesus at least cautioned against pursuing and having wealth or prized possessions, not because they are intrinsically bad but because they tend to interfere with spiritual and moral virtue. Or do you see something else behind Jesus' sarcasm and hyperbole?

 

 

The next line is "where moth and rust destroy and where thieves break in and steal."  So one recurring theme is that money is temporary and can be lost at any time, so it is foolish to place so much trust in it.  You see this also in Luke's parable of the Rich Fool,  or the comically morbid Lazarus and the rich man.  It's likely the authors of the Gospels believed the world would be ending within their lifetimes, so that makes sense.  So maybe Matthew's Jesus was being completely serious.. but I like to think that he knew the rich man was not discipleship material, so he was cutting through his bullshit.  Joking or not, the rich man walks away sadly, and the same point is made either way.

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Fwiw Jesus (as described in gospel accounts) probably had financial support from his followers. Judas was a treasurer so there had to be enough funding to put someone in charge of the books. Joseph of Arimathea (who thoughtfully let Jesus crash in his tomb for a few days), Zaccheus, Matthew (a repentant tax collector) and probably Nicodemus were all wealthy men and most likely sponsored his ministry. People were always inviting him over for dinner. That was probably customary for wandering rabbis, and today as well. Not saying he was getting rich, but a guy's gotta eat.

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Jesus had no problem turning fish and bread into multipkes so why feed him.  also 40Days in the desert also come to mind

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Every time I return to the christian belief system I end up selling most of my belongings. My beliefs keep telling me all my stuff is sinfull and I must get rid of it for jesus.

 

I've been there and done that several times. Your stuff is not sinful. You are being influenced by a very negative belief system. If it helps, when I went through Catholicism, I promised myself that I would not sell or get rid of anything (of course I got rid of my tarot cards, new agey books) so it didn't work. I wish I could say something that would help but just know you are not alone.

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