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Redeeming The Wasted Years


Guest Mog
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Hi,

I'm new here and not quite ready to post my story yet. But I wondered how people have managed to make up for the wasted years in religion.

What I mean is, from 20 to 30 I was involved in eastern religions and from 30 to 40 in christianity. Both of these - to generalise - teach that this world is not 'the real thing' so it can lead to not really caring about achievement in this world. Looking back now I feel this has really hampered my path in life and I now feel so much energy and enthusiasm to get on and do things.

 

Can anyone relate to this and give some positive stories about redeeming the wasted years spent in treading water until the next life?

 

Cheers

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Hi Mog, I understand where you're coming from concerning lost opportunities. I agree with Serenity, that you can't be preoccupied with the past and need to focus on what's ahead. But understand also that you did learn and develop some things during those years that will be useful as you move forward. Focus on those things. Perhaps you have self-discipline habits or people skills that were developed to a greater extent than you might have otherwise. In any case, realize what these strengths and skills are and be ready to capitalize on them in the future, with your new point of view. Also, welcome.

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Mog,

 

I recognize the feeling. But on the other hand I see it as a good thing to go through, because if I hadn't, then I wouldn't know it was all false. If I hadn't seen what it was, and get out of it, I could be in danger of being dragged into it now instead. I only regret that it took so long. I envy those who saw what it was in early age, and left before life started.

 

And welcome Mog.

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I generally deflect thoughts about wasted time with the belief that none of the time in my life has ever truly been wasted. All of it, everything I've done or seen or believed, has helped get me where I am today, and today really isn't too bad. that, plus I realize I had solid reasons why I used to be the way I was - many of those reasons being out of my control. If I didn't look at it that way I'd spend too much time lamenting all the years I had my head up my recharge socket.

 

I won't say those moments don't sometimes happen. But most of the time, when I worry about wasting time, I worry about wasting time in my current life, not in the years past.

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This is something I still struggle with. It's like I'm finding myself for the first time. So much of life while a Christian was wrapped up in "what would Jesus do?" (interpreted by the church, of course), that you have to now develop your own system of evaluation for life. I read as much as I can, and explore different ideas. Eventually, I figure I'll find something that fits. In the mean time, I do the best I can with the knowledge I do have.

 

I also totally agree with gwenmead.

I generally deflect thoughts about wasted time with the belief that none of the time in my life has ever truly been wasted. All of it, everything I've done or seen or believed, has helped get me where I am today, and today really isn't too bad. that, plus I realize I had solid reasons why I used to be the way I was - many of those reasons being out of my control. If I didn't look at it that way I'd spend too much time lamenting all the years I had my head up my recharge socket.

It is hard sometimes to pick out the good in your past and not dwell on the bad. Especially when I think about all that money I wasted in tithes and offerings...grrrrrr. :ugh: I would have gotten a better return on my money if I had went to the casino.

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I recognize the feeling. But on the other hand I see it as a good thing to go through, because if I hadn't, then I wouldn't know it was all false. If I hadn't seen what it was, and get out of it, I could be in danger of being dragged into it now instead.

 

That's true. I've seen people older get into it and they don't question how mentally, emotionally, socially, financally and vocationally {Honey, Jesus didn't die so you can have a career and go to college. Do you care about work or God at night?} damging it is. It ticks me off because their kids are being screwed up and they are 40s.

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