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Do You Still Listen To Christian Music?


PeaceOfMind
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Whether it being worship, contemporary, or just plain Christian rock in general, do you, at some point, still find yourself listening to Christian music? For myself I will rarely listen, albeit for a select few bands.

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Some of it yes. I find Gregorian Chants to be soothing for instance. Some of the old gospel hymms are pretty. To me music is about a human achievement, not just about the subject matter.

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Whether it being worship, contemporary, or just plain Christian rock in general, do you, at some point, still find yourself listening to Christian music? For myself I will rarely listen, albeit for a select few bands.

 

There's no jebus death cult music business over here in Germany... not more than some few artists writing lyrics with death cult messages that is. Few and far between, not a serious danger (and anyway, without the societal pro-death-cult brainwashing everywhere, a bit of music won't be enough to do real damage).

That said, there are a few songs with death cult theme that I still like. Among them are the goo' ol' Chris DeBurgh song "Crusader" (for the sheer mood and the depiction of the "romantic crusader" fighting for The Just Cause™), and one of exactly two songs by German fundie fuckface Xavier Naidoo (the other one is part of a movie soundtrack so he couldn't sneak in his propaganda this time :fdevil: ). That song is called "Seine Strassen" (his streets) and, though the lyrics are the standard end-times-jebus-returns crap, somehow they appear to me to be more of a generic "beware of hubris" message... which I can accept easily. :shrug:

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I am a choral director and technically, still a church musician. I have never really gotten into Christian Rock or Christian Contemporary because most of it lacks aritistic merit. However, most historic choral literature is sacred. I can enjoy it from an artistic standpoint without having to believe the underlying message. For example, I'll be performing the Mozart Requiem and Mozart Coronation mass next month. Just consider it myth.

 

Even though I am no longer a believer, I still enjoy hymnology. Again, this is more academic/artistic than based on guiding beliefs. Some of the gospel hymns, such as "I'll Fly Away" are just fun to sing, if for no more reason than their foolishness.

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I don't listen to any Christian music. Now singing is a different story. I guess the main reason is that I was always in choir, both at school and in the church. "Amazing Grace" really is one of my favorites. Also "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot". Old habits die hard I guess. :shrug:

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Yes, I do. I didn't for a long time b/c as a former music director at my church, it brought back too many painful memories. However, as time has gone on, I find comfort in some of the music, and I still find enjoyment in the music itself, regardless of the message.

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Whether it being worship, contemporary, or just plain Christian rock in general, do you, at some point, still find yourself listening to Christian music?

 

:twitch:

 

Christ, no! I've always hated xtian music, especially those god-awful hymns. I was strictly secular before my conversion, and I made an attempt to force myself to like xtian music, but I just couldn't do it. It is (save for Gregorian chants and some classical pieces) the worst music ever conceived.

 

As Bart Simpson once remarked, "Everyone knows the best bands are affiliated with Satan." :HaHa:

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The UPCI was allllll about the music. I still listen to Chris Rice -- my name is from one of his songs -- but nothing else. The other day I put on one of my old mass choir cds about of boredom, but thankfully it had no emotional effect on me.

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I used to listen to it all the time but since leaving the fold I can't really it. The only album I still listen from time to time would be the instrumental Freedom, from Michael W. Smith. It's really good, except for the last songs.

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All I have left in my music collection is 1 cd from a christian band where the songs do not have much of a christian theme, plus some choral music.

 

Other than that, I got rid of all my christian music after deconverting, so the answer is mostly no.

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I still listen to the Christian artists:

 

Sarah Groves

SG.jpg

 

Fernando Ortega

fernando-ortega-150.jpg

 

They are both very talented musicians, and can write a melody and sing a song as well as any other contemporary musician. Very beautiful stuff -- I would recommend it to any died in the well atheist and expect them to enjoy it.

 

Besides the sheer artistry of the music, I like to hear people explore moral and mystical themes in their lyrics even though I no longer believe in divine vengeance as taught by the Christian thought system. These artists sing about religious emotions, and I find that neat!

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The vast majority of Christian music is hell to my ears. The hymns and the "contemporary" are both severely, as Beowulf so well put it, lacking in "artistic merit".

 

Now I do love me some Gregorian chants. I love Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina - his mastery of counterpoint has yet to be equalled - and I absolutely love Anonymous 4's albums of mideval church chant. I can have very spiritual moments listening to that music, even though I don't understand the words. I guess it's just from the mideval church's stronger practice of mysticism, which was so seriously lacking in the cold, hard religion I was brought up with.

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I hate admitting this and feel guilty for it, but I confess that I do enjoy select few xtian songs (about 3-5 currently), even though I scoff at the stuff the singers say.

I guess its because the singers have gerat voices or I just like the beat of the song. An example; one of my favs. the stuff I think while listening to it:

"The Christmas Shoes" - yeah, okay, so your god makes a kid's mother die froma long drawn illness to remind you of "what xmas is all about"?

But the singer has a great voice.

"Voice of Truth"- If you try you can make jesus sound like "reason". I'm pathetic, I know.

 

I also like Gregorian music, mosly b/c its in latin and I don't have to hear the word "gawd" and whatnot. But that I can explain, my psych teacher says songs of that pitch appeal to some (i forget) part of the brain in some people.

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Oh! I should mention since everyone seems to like the Gregorian Chants, there are purely secular verisions out by a group called the Maters of Chant. Their verision of Lady in Red is fabulous.

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Whether it being worship, contemporary, or just plain Christian rock in general, do you, at some point, still find yourself listening to Christian music? For myself I will rarely listen, albeit for a select few bands.

 

 

For me< I will always enjoy christmas music in general. Its even more enjoyable now that its beautiful in its own sake now knowing that it celebrates a fantasy> No problem.

Any fuckin fundie jeesus saves me fuckin crap makes me ill, however.

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In no particular order.

 

MWS -- largely for nostalga. Some of his narriative songs are pretty cool, too.

 

Underoath -- When a Jesus-rock group puts on a better show than Thrice, that's saying something. It is some seriously nice screamo, IMHO. Also, most of their album is about life in general, anyway.

 

For Christmas music, I still like Manheim Steamroller. I am familiar with their other work, and a lot of the references and musical jokes they put in there I find hilarious. There are also a lot of good memories associated with their music, to me.

 

Hey, I listen to Motion City Soundtrack, Faraquet and Sparta as well (gotta reestablish some indie cred after this post.) *grin*

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The music, in and of itself, sucks. All of the lyrics are just a regurgitation of Bible scriptures and catchphrases. However, some of the singers are hella talented(and should get into secular music)...

 

I grew up in Black baptist church and I still love to hear Gospel choir to this day. It does not get any better!

 

But yeah, overall, Christian music sucks.

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I'm also an ex-fundie and there are some songs that have sentimental value. "Ain't no grave gonna hold my body down" was one of my Mother's favorites and we had them sing it at her funeral. My Mom and Dad use to sing "The Old Gospel Ship" which always worked everyone into a frenzy.When my niece died with cancer we were singing" Beulah Land" when she took her last breath. No I don't believe in the message of these songs anymore but it's hard to hate songs that were so much a part of my life.

I do however hate some songs that say stuff about being unworthy. Feeling unworthy screwed me up for 40 plus years. My son is into very heavy metal and plays in a band and although the screaming and barking gets on my nerves, the lyrics of some of the songs make more sense that gospel.

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I still have a couple Xhristian bands in my rotation (EDL comes to mind) but not too many I found them be be rather hokey I do still own much Christian SKA just because no one will buy it form me I can't even unload it at the local record store. but for the most part I have gotten rid of my christian music.

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I admit to being a sucker for "Ave Maria" and christmas music. Agnes Dei, Gregorian chant, classical and contemperary....I like what I like even though the words no longer hold any meaning for me religiously.

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