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Any Part Of The Bible You Still Find Inspiring?


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Even though we no longer accept it as truth, does anyone else out there still have a little piece of the bible they still like? Myself, I still like the book of Ecclesiastes, which is particularly entertaining becuse most xtians hate it. (I don't think any of them get past the first chapter.) In the end, the proghet concludes that happiness isn't about success, but is just loving your life.

 

I also like the story of the widow's mite, for what it says about the meaning of giving.

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I like Ecclesiastes too..."Vanity, vanity, all is vanity and a striving after wind". I can relate to that, sometimes.

 

But I guess I'll always like Proverbs..."A fool and his money are soon parted". (Wait a minute, was that one of them, or somebody else's??) :scratch:

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I find no part of the Babble to be inspiring. It's as much a part of my life as child pornography.

 

I'll read the Havamal, or perhaps a Buddhist text, if I want inspiring religious literature.

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Matt 6:34 Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about its own things. Sufficient for the day is its own trouble.

 

I like to remember to live for the moment because I don't know if I'll get a chance to see tomorrow.

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Phillipians 4:8 has always inspired me, and will continue to do so..

 

8. Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.

 

It's "Don't worry, be happy" for the Roman age!

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"Neither a borrower nor a lender be"...

 

Hold on... I think that was shakespeare.

 

 

but seriously..

 

I like the nativity story in Matthew. Especially the way Linus delivers it in the Charlie Brown christmas special. Wise men. No room at the inn. Joy to the world. Hope is alive. Jesus is born.

 

If only he hadn't turned into such a judgmental shit later in the story.

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I rather like the story of Susanna in chapter 13 of the book of Daniel. Ingenious piece of cross-examination saves an innocent woman's life.

 

And Matthew 25:31-46 ("I was hungry and you fed me") is the one section of the NT that I actually like and have no quarrel with.

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I always found Proverbs had some weird and inconsistant things to say and it was merely my limitations that prevented me from grasping the true meaning.

 

I now realize that it is merely poorly written. And to think that there were many other books that were rejected in favour of the 66 books it has. Man, some of those must have been bad.

 

I am now heading into a phase where I am realizing that the bible is extremely inconsistant on many levels especially morally.

 

Jack Miles says this, "God is a God of radical unpredictability and terrifying moral ambivalence".

 

I am finding that many of the OT stories are so morally abhorrant to me.

 

For example, (there are many) the story of Abraham taking his little boy up a mountain to sacrifice him. I don't give a rats ass that the story says that god stopped him. The idea that he would have done it, is morally offensive. It is repugnant.

 

On the other hand, the Sermon on the Mount teaches us to be the supreme victim for god. If someone slaps you on one cheek, give them another. If they rape your daughter, give them your son. Ick!! Stand up for yourself and have some self-respect.

 

Mongo

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Ecclesiastes is great. I love it.

 

I do like Proverbs, too. Unlike Mungo, I don't find it to be poorly written. It blatantly contradicts itself in an attempt to try to get the reader to think about how to apply its terse nuggets of wisdom. Of course, a non-believer will find that much of its wisdom simply doesn't apply, but that shouldn't come as a surprise.

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Even though we no longer accept it as truth, does anyone else out there still have a little piece of the bible they still like? Myself, I still like the book of Ecclesiastes, which is particularly entertaining becuse most xtians hate it. (I don't think any of them get past the first chapter.) In the end, the proghet concludes that happiness isn't about success, but is just loving your life.

 

I also like the story of the widow's mite, for what it says about the meaning of giving.

 

 

Is there a part that says "THE END?"

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"The path of the righteous man is beset on all sides by the iniquities of the selfish and the tyranny of evil men. Blessed is he, who in the name of charity and good will, shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children. And I will strike down upon thee with great vengeance and furious anger those who would attempt to poison and destroy my brothers. And you will know my name is the Lord when I lay my vengeance upon thee." -Jules

 

But seriously, James 1:2-4 "Consider it pure joy my brothers, whenever you face trials of many kinds, because you know that the testing of your faith develops perserverance. Perserverance must finish its work so that you may be mature and complete, not lacking anything."

 

Even though I have no faith to strengthen anymore, I like this verse because when I'm going through a hard time I know that it will develop perserverance, which leads to maturity. Kind of like the "what doesn't kill you makes you stronger" thingy.

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I wouldn't go so far as to call it "inspiring," but I've always found Song of Solomon kind of interesting, especially in the context of the fundy church I was in. Odd, but I never heard breasts compared to mounds of fruit even once while sitting in the church. Come to think of it, I don't think I ever heard ANY passage from that book quoted in church! I guess the Hebrews of old could be downright racy at times!

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I think the whole Bible is intriguing as far as peeling back the layers of mythology to find the underlying, very human origins and evolution of it as a collective work of literature. It's ancient literary archeology. Additionally to see how human's psychology responds to belief in it peronsally, and how it has both served and shaped cultures as a vehicle for social ideas and religious and state institutions. Seeing how the Christian ideas along with Greek philosophy have molded our civilization. It's inspiring in that it's fascinating in undestanding just how much a place it has held in shaping Western culture and influencing our world views.

 

On a personal level, I would say the verse "Love your neighbor as yourself" is the most inspiring. However, not to give the Bible itself too much credit on that one, it is a human philosophy that pre-dates the Jesus character saying it.

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Interesting that we've got others who like Ecclesiastes, too. Honest, if you mention it in a room full of xtians, their noses all wrinkle up and they make vowel sounds.

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Especially the way Linus delivers it in the Charlie Brown christmas special. Wise men. No room at the inn. Joy to the world. Hope is alive. Jesus is born.

I always liked this too, it always made me teary-eyed when I watched it as a kid. I guess it doesn't say much for the Bible that as a Christian a cartoon had more influence on me than the Bible itself....

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest Mike1945

I still like this one. I think it's one of the best definitions of love I've ever read.

 

"If I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am become sounding brass, or a clanging cymbal. And if I have the gift of prophecy, and know all mysteries and all knowledge; and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. And if I bestow all my goods to feed the poor, and if I give my body to be burned, but have not love, it profiteth me nothing. Love suffereth long, and is kind; love envieth not; love vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up, doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not its own, is not provoked, taketh not account of evil; rejoiceth not in unrighteousness, but rejoiceth with the truth; beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth all things. Love never faileth: but whether there be prophecies, they shall be done away; whether there be tongues, they shall cease; whether there be knowledge, it shall be done away...But now abideth faith, hope, love, these three; and the greatest of these is love." (I Cor. 13:1-8 &13 - ASV)

 

But if you want truly inspired reading, pick up Kahlil Gibran's THE PROPHET.

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The Golden Rule still inspires me. And "Let he who is without sin cast the first stone". I think everyone should incorporate that one into their daily life. Hm, there are a couple more but I can't think of them now...

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Song of Solomon can make some really nice love poetry.

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I can't get past the mythology to find any inspiration any more. My Christianity was so entwined with that book that to find a part inspiring would be to give it credibility it doesn't deserve. That's how it feels in my mind any way.

 

I do agree that it is intriguing and sometimes entertaining to find inconsistencies and discover the TRUE history and archaeology of the times and places the Bible butchers. Other than that, even the most 'inspirational' passages simply remind me of how many lies I bought for so long.....

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I can't get past the mythology to find any inspiration any more. My Christianity was so entwined with that book that to find a part inspiring would be to give it credibility it doesn't deserve. That's how it feels in my mind any way.

 

I do agree that it is intriguing and sometimes entertaining to find inconsistencies and discover the TRUE history and archaeology of the times and places the Bible butchers. Other than that, even the most 'inspirational' passages simply remind me of how many lies I bought for so long.....

 

I hear ya on that :jerkit:

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I still like Song of Solomon. It fits well with some of the Hymns to Inanna. Sex-EEE!

 

I also love how nervous Xians get when you tell them the book is a bunch of erotic love poetry. :wicked:

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Interesting that we've got others who like Ecclesiastes, too. Honest, if you mention it in a room full of xtians, their noses all wrinkle up and they make vowel sounds.

 

I'm new to this forum, referred by a dear friend. He and I see things a bit differently. He's agnostic. I'm Christian. But we don't allow these differences to interfere with all we have in common! So we respect each other, treat each other with kindness and dignity, and learn a lot from each other.

 

The quote above caused me to decide to post.

 

I love Ecclesiastes. It's been my favorite Hebrew Bible reading for at least a decade. What a great read. So, at least one Christian does not wrinkle up his nose and make vowel sounds when you mention this writing! ( smile )

 

Rabbi Harold Kushner (most famous for When Bad Things Happen to Good People) has written a terrific book based on Ecclesiastes: When All You've Ever Wanted Isn't Enough. I highly recommend any of his ten books.

 

Thanks everyone,

currentchristian in massachusetts

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I like the Bible becuase it's so easy rub Christians nose in shit becuase the bible is filled with piles of shit.

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I like the verse where Jesus tells his followers to wait until he's gone, and then write a book about the whole thing, and then make a religion out of it, and then persecute people who don't worship the book.

 

 

Rob

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I still like this one. I think it's one of the best definitions of love I've ever read.

 

"If I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am become sounding brass, or a clanging cymbal. And if I have the gift of prophecy, and know all mysteries and all knowledge; and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. And if I bestow all my goods to feed the poor, and if I give my body to be burned, but have not love, it profiteth me nothing. Love suffereth long, and is kind; love envieth not; love vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up, doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not its own, is not provoked, taketh not account of evil; rejoiceth not in unrighteousness, but rejoiceth with the truth; beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth all things. Love never faileth: but whether there be prophecies, they shall be done away; whether there be tongues, they shall cease; whether there be knowledge, it shall be done away...But now abideth faith, hope, love, these three; and the greatest of these is love." (I Cor. 13:1-8 &13 - ASV)

 

But if you want truly inspired reading, pick up Kahlil Gibran's THE PROPHET.

 

This one can't be beat, Mike1945, for defining what love is. Often as I wait in check-out lanes and wait and wait and wait, "love is patient" comes to mind. When I want to let my mind wander off into thoughts of revenge, I recall that love "does not take into account a wrong suffered." Hard, hard, hard, good news.

 

Interesting that you mention THE PROPHET. A friend, agnostic at the time but now a Deist-theist, introduced me to that fine book. With my students at the jail once we read THE PROPHET as a class. They loved it. "That's deep," they said more than once.

 

-currentchristian in massachusetts

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