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Dealing With Triggers


Crazycatlady
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As mentioned in another thread, on April 1st, an acquaintance told me that "Jesus loves" me which triggered a negative (anger, hurt, fight-or-flight) response from me. (Since this took place during my premenstrual cycle, my response was much stronger than usual). The next day (yesterday), someone was presenting his church basketball league website in our communications technology class. That also acted as a negative trigger for me, though not nearly as strongly as the other. Since I had an appointment with my therapist today, I brought up these events for discussion. I know that many of us here experience negative triggers, so I decided to post what my therapist recommended as a way to cope with these triggers.

 

The first thing is to know what one's triggers are and be able to recognize them when they occur. It's also important to recognize that these triggers do serve a function (in my case, they are a protective measure against re-entering Christianity). If you can recognize your triggers, you can then form a plan of action.

 

My therapist suggested as a plan of action to pick something else to think about when I encounter a trigger. It has to be something powerful enough to override the thoughts caused by the trigger. To my surprise, she suggested just responding to a xtain trigger by brainstorming positive things about myself for a few minutes. This surprised me because it was such a simple suggestion. It also fits quite well since xtainity has forced me to dwell on the negative things about myself. Anyway, you can pick whatever you want to think about -- just make sure that it's something strong enough to chase out the negative thoughts/feelings and is positive in and of itself.

 

After awhile, the trigger should switch from being a trigger of negativity to being a trigger of positivity. Eventually, its overall strength should decline.

 

I hope that this proves helpful. Please share other methods that you've found.

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thanks for the note! i am also the one who needs to start thinking more positively about himself. Everyone says its healthy but i tend to choose my own negative way =)

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Guest Marty
As mentioned in another thread, on April 1st, an acquaintance told me that "Jesus loves" me which triggered a negative (anger, hurt, fight-or-flight) response from me. (Since this took place during my premenstrual cycle, my response was much stronger than usual). The next day (yesterday), someone was presenting his church basketball league website in our communications technology class. That also acted as a negative trigger for me, though not nearly as strongly as the other. Since I had an appointment with my therapist today, I brought up these events for discussion. I know that many of us here experience negative triggers, so I decided to post what my therapist recommended as a way to cope with these triggers.

 

The first thing is to know what one's triggers are and be able to recognize them when they occur. It's also important to recognize that these triggers do serve a function (in my case, they are a protective measure against re-entering Christianity). If you can recognize your triggers, you can then form a plan of action.

 

My therapist suggested as a plan of action to pick something else to think about when I encounter a trigger. It has to be something powerful enough to override the thoughts caused by the trigger. To my surprise, she suggested just responding to a xtain trigger by brainstorming positive things about myself for a few minutes. This surprised me because it was such a simple suggestion. It also fits quite well since xtainity has forced me to dwell on the negative things about myself. Anyway, you can pick whatever you want to think about -- just make sure that it's something strong enough to chase out the negative thoughts/feelings and is positive in and of itself.

 

After awhile, the trigger should switch from being a trigger of negativity to being a trigger of positivity. Eventually, its overall strength should decline.

 

I hope that this proves helpful. Please share other methods that you've found.

 

See? Why couldn't MY therapist tell me this? Because she is a xtain, that's why! Brilliant post, CrazycatLady, thanks!

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on April 1st, an acquaintance told me that "Jesus loves" me

It was a joke,probably. :)

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on April 1st, an acquaintance told me that "Jesus loves" me

It was a joke,probably. :)

 

I would love to think that, but I know Jeremy and it was no joke. *mumbles annoyedily*

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I like that idea, and plan to use it!

My therapist has observed that I am so "judgemental" of myself. He's always asking me what scale I'm using to judge myself with. Of course, it goes back to my religious training. I am finally learning to be more accepting of myself and others. As for triggers, I seem to have the most with my husband, as my fanatical religious life was wrapped up in my marriage, too. I'll try your idea!

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That's very useful info. Thanks for posting it!

 

Kinda makes me miss the days back in 06 when I used to go to a therapist. But that's excellent advice, though I'm sure it would take time to be able to do in response to a trigger.

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